Search results for 'Stpehen R. L. Clark' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen R. L. Clark (2013). Dougherty (Ed.) Evidentialism and its Discontents_ (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Pp. Xii + 335. £45.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 956350 0.

    Clark & VanArragon (Eds) _Evidence and Religious Belief
    (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Pp. X + 214. £35.00 (Hbk), £24.94 (Kindle). ISBN 9780 19 960371 8.
     [REVIEW]
    Religious Studies 49 (1):134-139.
    score: 2182.5
    Book Reviews STEPHEN R. L. CLARK, Religious Studies , FirstView Article(s).
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  2. Anne L. Clark (2005). Rebecca L. R. Garber, Feminine Figurae: Representations of Gender in Religious Texts by Medieval German Women Writers, 1100–1375. (Studies in Medieval History and Culture, 10.) New York and London: Routledge, 2002. Pp. Xvii, 295; 2 Black-and-White Illustrations. $85. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (1):226-228.score: 2160.0
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  3. Stpehen R. L. Clark (2007). How Alien Are Animals? In Pierfrancesco Basile & Leemon B. McHenry (eds.), Consciousness, Reality and Value: Essays in Honour of T.L.S. Sprigge. Ontos.score: 2130.0
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  4. Albert C. Clark (1906). Sabbadini's Finds of Latin and Greek MSS R. Sabbadini. Le Scoperte Dei Codici Latini Et Greci Ne' Secoli XIV Et XV. Firenze: G. C. Sansoni, 1905. Pp. 233. L. 5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (04):224-229.score: 1890.0
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  5. Albert C. Clark (1900). Tyrrell and Purser's Correspondence of Cicero The Correspondence of Cicero, Edited by R. Y. Tyrrell and L. C. Purser. Vol. VI. Dublin University Press Series. Dublin and London, 1899. Pp. Cxvii, 347. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 14 (03):174-180.score: 1890.0
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  6. Stephen R. L. Clark (2006). G.K.Chesterton: Thinking Backward, Looking Forward. Templeton Foundation Press.score: 1732.5
    Offering a detailed study of early 20th-century essayist, poet, novelist, political campaigner, and theologian G.K. Chesterton, author Stephen R.L. Clark ...
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  7. Stephen R. L. Clark (1997). Animals and Their Moral Standing. Routledge.score: 1732.5
    Twenty years ago, people thought only cranks or sentimentalists could be seriously concerned about the treatment of non-human animals. However, since then philosophers, scientists and welfarists have raised public awareness of the issue; and they have begun to lay the foundations for an enormous change in human practice. This book is a record of the development of 'animal rights' through the eyes of one highly-respected and well-known thinker. This book brings together for the first time Stephen R.L. Clark's major (...)
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  8. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). God's World and the Great Awakening. Oxford University Press.score: 1732.5
    In this book, Stephen R.L. Clark defends the primary faith of humankind, that there is a real world which is more than a shadow of our desires and fancies, and which can be discovered through right reason. Focusing on the way in which we can "turn aside" to the Truth from the normal delusions of self-concern, Clark offers a properly worked, Platonic metaphysics as the key to identifying that reality. This book is the final volume of Limits and (...)
     
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  9. Stephen R. L. Clark (2012). T.L.S. Sprigge, The Importance of Subjectivity: Selected Essays in Metaphysics and Ethics, Ed. B. McHenry Leemon. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2010, Xi + 356 Pp., £47. ISBN: 978-0-19-959154-1. [REVIEW] Philosophy 87 (02):310-315.score: 1305.0
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  10. S. R. L. Clark (1991). Book Review : Ethics After Babel, by Jeffrey Stout. Cambridge, James Clarke, 1990. Xiv + 338 Pp. 9.95. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (2):92-93.score: 1005.0
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  11. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). The Political Animal: Biology, Ethics, and Politics. Routledge.score: 945.0
    In The Political Animal Stephen Clark investigates the political nature of the human animal. Based on biological science and traditional ethics, he probes into areas of inquiry that are usually ignored by traditional political theory. He suggests that properly informed political philosophy must take the role of women and children more seriously, and must be prepared to face up to the ethnocentric and domineering tendencies of the human animal.
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  12. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 945.0
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and hopes (...)
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  13. Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). Biology and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 945.0
    This stimulating and wide-ranging book mounts a profound enquiry into some of the most pressing questions of our age, by examining the relationship between biological science and Christianity. The history of biological discovery is explored from the point of view of a leading philosopher and ethicist. What effect should modern biological theory and practice have on Christian understanding of ethics? How much of that theory and practice should Christians endorse? Can Christians, for example, agree that biological changes are not governed (...)
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  14. Stephen R. L. Clark (1989). Civil Peace and Sacred Order. Oxford University Press.score: 945.0
    This book is an ambitious and challenging restatement of traditional political philosophy. The first of a three-volume series, Limits and Renewals, the book is concerned with the nature of political society, particularly with the errors and faulty arguments that have been used to support a "liberal modernist" view of the state and our political system. Clark argues that political modernism, which is determinedly secular and untraditional, has been a destructive influence on religion and our understanding of community living. In (...)
     
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  15. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). A Parliament of Souls. Oxford University Press.score: 945.0
    This second volume in the Limits and Renewals trilogy is an attempt to restate a traditional philosophy of mind, drawing on philosophical and poetical resources that are often neglected in modern and postmodern thought, and emphasizing the moral and political implications of differing philosophies of mind and value. Clark argues that without the traditional concept of the soul, we have little reason to believe that rational thought and individual autonomy are either possible or desirable. The particular topics covered include (...)
     
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  16. S. R. L. Clark (2005). Review: Can a Darwinian Be a Christian? The Relationship Between Science and Religion. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (455):773-777.score: 855.0
  17. Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Philosophers and Popular Cosmology. Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (1):115-122.score: 855.0
  18. Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). The Evolution of Language: Truth and Lies. Philosophy 75 (3):401-421.score: 855.0
    There is both theoretical and experimental reason to suppose that no-one could ever have learned to speak without an environment of language-users. How then did the first language-users learn? Animal communication systems provide no help, since human languages aren't constituted as a natural system of signs, and are essentially recursive and syntactic. Such languages aren't demanded by evolution, since most creatures, even intelligent creatures, manage very well without them. I propose that representations, and even public representations like sculptures, precede full (...)
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  19. Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). How to Believe in Fairies. Inquiry 30 (4):337 – 355.score: 855.0
    To believe in fairies is not to believe in rare Lepidoptera or the like, within a basically materialistic context. It is to take folk?stories seriously as accounts of the ?dreamworld?, the realm of conscious experience of which our ?waking world? is only a province, to acknowledge and make real to ourselves the presence of spirits that enter our consciousness as moods of love or alienation, wild joy or anger. In W. B. Yeats's philosophy fairies are the moods and characters of (...)
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  20. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Non-Personal Minds. In Minds and Persons: Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement: 53. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 185-209.score: 855.0
    Persons are creatures with a range of personal capacities. Most known to us are also people, though nothing in observation or biological theory demands that all and only people are persons, nor even that persons, any more than people, constitute a natural kind. My aim is to consider what non-personal minds are like. Darwin's Earthworms are sensitive, passionate and, in their degree, intelligent. They may even construct maps, embedded in the world they perceive around them, so as to be able (...)
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  21. Stephen R. L. Clark (2004). Progress and the Argument From Evil. Religious Studies 40 (2):181-192.score: 855.0
    The argument from evil, though it is the most effective rhetorical argument against orthodox theism, fails to demonstrate its conclusion, since we are unavoidably ignorant whether there is more evil than could possibly be justified. That same ignorance infects any claims to discern a divine purpose in nature, as well as recent attempts at a broadly Irenaean theodicy. Evolution is not, on neo-Darwinian theory, intellectually, morally, or spiritually progressive in the way that some religious thinkers have supposed. To suppose so, (...)
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  22. Stephen R. L. Clark (1982). God's Law and Morality. Philosophical Quarterly 32 (129):339-347.score: 855.0
  23. Stephen R. L. Clark (2008). Deconstructing the Laws of Logic. Philosophy 83 (1):25-53.score: 855.0
    I consider reasons for questioning 'the laws of logic' (identity, non-contradiction, excluded middle, and negation), and suggest that these laws do not accord with everyday reality. Either they are rhetorical tools rather than absolute truths, or else Plato and his successors were right to think that they identify a reality distinct from the ordinary world of experience, and also from the ultimate source of reality.
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  24. Stephen R. L. Clark (1996). Minds, Memes, and Multiples. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (1):21-28.score: 855.0
  25. Stephen R. L. Clark (1979). The Rights of Wild Things. Inquiry 22 (1-4):171 – 188.score: 855.0
    It has been argued that if non-human animals had rights we should be obliged to defend them against predators. I contend that this either does not follow, follows in the abstract but not in practice, or is not absurd. We should defend non-humans against large or unusual dangers, when we can, but should not claim so much authority as to regulate all the relationships of wild things. Some non-human animals are members of our society, and the rhetoric of 'the land (...)
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  26. Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). Animal Rights. The Classical Review 37 (02):224-.score: 855.0
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  27. Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Waking-Up: A Neglected Model for the Afterlife. Inquiry 26 (2):209 – 230.score: 855.0
    An inquiry into the possibility that life?after?death be understood as waking from a shared dream into the real world. Attempts to outlaw the possibility that ?really? we are, e.g., vat?brains are shown to lead to unwelcome, anti?realist conclusions about either the world or consciousness. The unsatisfactory nature of empirically observable (Humean) causal connections suggests that real causes may be found beyond the world of our present experience. Though such a story cannot now be proved to be true, we are entitled (...)
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  28. Stephen R. L. Clark (2010). How to Become Unconscious. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (67):21-44.score: 855.0
    Consistent materialists are almost bound to suggest that , if it exists at all, is no more than epiphenomenal. A correct understanding of the real requires that everything we do and say is no more than a product of whatever processes are best described by physics, without any privileged place, person, time or scale of action. Consciousness is a myth, or at least a figment. Plotinus was no materialist: for him, it is Soul and Intellect that are more real than (...)
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  29. Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Minds, Memes, and Rhetoric. Inquiry 36 (1-2):3-16.score: 855.0
    Dennett's Consciousness Explained presents, but does not demonstrate, a fully naturalized account of consciousness that manages to leave out the very consciousness he purports to explain. If he were correct, realism and methodological individualism would collapse, as would the very enterprise of giving reasons. The metaphors he deploys actually testify to the power of metaphoric imagination that can no more be identified with the metaphors it creates than minds can be identified with memes. That latter equation, of minds with meme?complexes, (...)
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  30. Stephen R. L. Clark (1972). The Use of `Man's Function' in Aristotle. Ethics 82 (4):269-283.score: 855.0
  31. Stephen R. L. Clark (2011). Plato's Philosophers: The Coherence of the Dialogues. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):811 - 815.score: 855.0
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 811-815, July 2011.
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  32. Stephen R. L. Clark (2009). Plotinian Dualisms and the "Greek" Ideas of Self. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (4):554-567.score: 855.0
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  33. Stephen R. L. Clark (2010). Review of Michael Ruse, Science and Spirituality: Making Room for Faith in the Age of Science. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).score: 855.0
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  34. Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Sexual Ontology and Group Marriage. Philosophy 58 (224):215 - 227.score: 855.0
  35. Stephen R. L. Clark (2002). Feyerabend's Conquest of Abundance. Inquiry 45 (2):249 – 267.score: 855.0
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  36. Stephen R. L. Clark (1994). The Possible Truth of Metaphor. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (1):19 – 30.score: 855.0
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  37. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Tolstoy on Aesthetics: What is Art? By H. O. Mounce (Ashgate: Aldershot, 2001), Pp Viii + 115, £Xxxx, ISBN 0 7546 0488 8. [REVIEW] Philosophy 78 (2):289-307.score: 855.0
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  38. Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). Have Biologists Wrapped Up Philosophy? Inquiry 43 (2):143 – 165.score: 855.0
    An examination of the currently fashionable thesis that scientists, and especially biologists in the wake of the Darwinian Revolution, can now solve the problems that traditional philosophers have only talked about. Past philosophers, for example during the Enlightenment, have themselves made use of contemporary, scientific techniques and theories. The present claim may only be another such move, to be welcomed by philosophers who would distinguish themselves from rhetoricians. Others may prefer to stake out the merely human or subjective world as (...)
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  39. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). Living High and Letting Die: Our Illusion of Innocence by Peter Unger. Oxford University Press: New York & Oxford, 1996, 199pp; ISBN 0195075897 £35.00; 0195108590 £13.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 74 (1):122-139.score: 855.0
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  40. Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). God's Law and Chandler. Philosophical Quarterly 37 (147):203-208.score: 855.0
  41. Stephen R. L. Clark (2009). The Verge of Philosophy . By John Sallis. University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 2007. 144 Pp. [REVIEW] Philosophy 84 (1):156-158.score: 855.0
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  42. Stephen R. L. Clark (1977/1984). The Moral Status of Animals. Oxford University Press.score: 855.0
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  43. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). Taylor's Waking Dream: No One's Reply. Inquiry 34 (2):195 – 215.score: 855.0
    Taylor recognizes the problems posed by the ideals of disengaged reason and the affirmation of ?ordinary life? for unproblematic commitment to other ideals of universal justice and the like. His picture of ?the modern identity? neglects too much of present importance and he is too disdainful of Platonic realism to offer a convincing solution. The romantic expressivism that he seeks to re?establish as an important moral resource can only avoid destructive effects if it is taken in its original and Platonic (...)
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  44. Stephen R. L. Clark (2002). Review: Religious Commitment and Secular Reason. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (443):639-643.score: 855.0
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  45. Stephen R. L. Clark (1984). God, Good, and Evil. In J. Houston (ed.), Is It Reasonable to Believe in God? Handsel Press. 247 - 264.score: 855.0
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  46. Stephen R. L. Clark (1985). Hume, Animals and the Objectivity of Morals. Philosophical Quarterly 35 (139):117-133.score: 855.0
  47. S. R. L. Clark (1992). Human Dignity and Animal Well-Being. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (3):165-166.score: 855.0
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  48. Stephen R. L. Clark (1997). What Ryle Meant by 'Absurd'. Cogito 11 (2):79-88.score: 855.0
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  49. Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Animal Rights and Human Morality. Environmental Ethics 5 (2):185-188.score: 855.0
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