Search results for 'Stpehen R. L. Clark' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Sexual Ontology and Group Marriage: Stephen R. L. Clark. Philosophy 58 (224):215-227.
    Philosophers of earlier ages have usually spent time in considering thenature of marital, and in general familial, duty. Paley devotes an entire book to those ‘relative duties which result from the constitution of the sexes’,1 a book notable on the one hand for its humanity and on the other for Paley‘s strange refusal to acknowledge that the evils for which he condemns any breach of pure monogamy are in large part the result of the fact that such breaches are generally (...)
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  2.  6
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Where Have All the Angels Gone?1: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK. Religious Studies 28 (2):221-234.
    Anyone who wishes to talk about angels has to respond to the mocking question, how many of them can dance on the point of a pin. The answer is: ‘just as many as they please’. Angels being immaterial intellects do not occupy space to the exclusion of any other such intellectual substance, and their being ‘on’ the point of a pin can only mean that they attend to it. The question, however, is not one that concerned our mediaeval predecessors, although (...)
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    Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Orwell and the Anti-Realists: Stephen R. L. Clark. Philosophy 67 (260):141-154.
    The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible.
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  4. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). How Many Selves Make Me?1: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:213-233.
    Cartesian accounts of the mental make it axiomatic that consciousness is transparent: what I feel, I know I feel, however many errors I may make about its cause. ‘I’ names a simple, unextended, irreducible substance, created ex nihilo or eternally existent, and only associated with the complete, extended, dissoluble substance or pretend-substance that is ‘my’ body by divine fiat. Good moderns take it for granted that ‘we’ now realize how shifting, foggy and deconstructible are the boundaries of the self; ‘we’ (...)
     
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  5.  2
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). World Religions and World Orders: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK. Religious Studies 26 (1):43-57.
    There are good reasons for being suspicious of the very concept of ‘a religion’, let alone a ‘world religion’. It may be useful for a hospital administrator to know a patient's ‘religion’ – as Protestant or Church of England or Catholic or Buddhist – but such labels clearly do little more than identify the most suitable chaplain, and connote groupings in the vast and confusing region of ‘religious thought and practice’ that are of very different ranks. By any rational, genealogical (...)
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  6. Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). The Better Part: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 35:29-49.
    According to Aristotle, the goal of anyone who is not simply stupid or slavish is to live a worthwhile life. There are, no doubt, people who have no goal at all beyond the moment's pleasure or release from pain. There may be people incapable of reaching any reasoned decision about what to do, and acting on it. But anyone who asks how she should live implicitly agrees that her goal is to live well, to live a life that she can (...)
     
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  7. Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). Abstract Morality, Concrete Cases: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:35-53.
    Practitioners of disciplines whose problems are debated by moral philosophers regularly complain that the philosophers are engaged in abstract speculation, divorced from ‘real-life’ consequences and responsibilities, that it is the practitioners who must take the decisions, and that they cannot act in accordance with strict abstract logic.
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  8. Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Descartes' Debt to Augustine: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:73-88.
    Jonathan Edwards identified the central act of faith as ‘the cordial consent of beings to Being in general’, which is to say to God . That equation, of Being, Truth and God, is rarely taken seriously in analytical circles. My argument will be that this is to neglect the real context of a great deal of past philosophy, particularly the very Cartesian arguments from which so many undergraduate courses begin. All too many students issue from such courses immunized against enthusiasm, (...)
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  9. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). The Limits of Explanation: Limited Explanations: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:195-210.
    When I was first approached to read a paper at the conference from which this volume takes its beginning I expected that Flint Schier, with whom I had taught a course on the Philosophy of Biology in my years at Glasgow, would be with us to comment and to criticize. I cannot let this occasion pass without expressing once again my own sense of loss. I am sure that we would all have gained by his presence, and hope that he (...)
     
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  10. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). Tools, Machines and Marvels: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 38:159-176.
    Technology, according to Derry and Williams's Short History , ‘comprises all that bewilderingly varied body of knowledge and devices by which man progressively masters his natural environment’. Their casual, and unconscious, sexism is not unrelated to my present topic. Women enter the story as spinners, burden bearers and, at long last, typists. ‘The tying of a bundle on the back or the dragging of it along upon the outspread twigs of a convenient branch are contributions [and by implication the only (...)
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  11.  15
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2013). Dougherty Evidentialism and its Discontents_ . Pp. Xii + 335. £45.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 956350 0. Clark & VanArragon _Evidence and Religious Belief . Pp. X + 214. £35.00 , £24.94 . ISBN 9780 19 960371 8. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):134-139.
    Book Reviews STEPHEN R. L. CLARK, Religious Studies, FirstView Article.
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  12.  3
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2013). Dougherty Evidentialism and its Discontents_ . Pp. Xii + 335. £45.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 956350 0. Clark & VanArragon _Evidence and Religious Belief . Pp. X + 214. £35.00 , £24.94 . ISBN 9780 19 960371 8. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):134-139.
    Book Reviews STEPHEN R. L. CLARK, Religious Studies, FirstView Article.
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  13.  5
    Anne L. Clark (2005). Rebecca L. R. Garber, Feminine Figurae: Representations of Gender in Religious Texts by Medieval German Women Writers, 1100–1375. New York and London: Routledge, 2002. Pp. Xvii, 295; 2 Black-and-White Illustrations. $85. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (1):226-228.
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  14. Anne L. Clark (2005). Feminine Figurae: Representations of Gender in Religious Texts by Medieval German Women Writers, 1100-1375Rebecca L. R. Garber. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (1):226-228.
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  15. Stpehen R. L. Clark (2007). How Alien Are Animals? In Pierfrancesco Basile & Leemon B. McHenry (eds.), Consciousness, Reality and Value: Essays in Honour of T.L.S. Sprigge. Ontos
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  16.  9
    Albert C. Clark (1906). Sabbadini's Finds of Latin and Greek MSS R. Sabbadini. Le Scoperte Dei Codici Latini Et Greci Ne' Secoli XIV Et XV. Firenze: G. C. Sansoni, 1905. Pp. 233. L. 5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (04):224-229.
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  17.  11
    Albert C. Clark (1900). Tyrrell and Purser's Correspondence of Cicero The Correspondence of Cicero, Edited by R. Y. Tyrrell and L. C. Purser. Vol. VI. Dublin University Press Series. Dublin and London, 1899. Pp. Cxvii, 347. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 14 (03):174-180.
  18. M. Clark (1976). GODDARD, L. And ROUTLEY, R. "The Logic of Significance and Context, Volume I". [REVIEW] Mind 85:457.
     
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  19. Stephen R. L. Clark & Stephen Clark (2008). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality is a subject which has long been explored and imagined by science fiction writers. In his intriguing new study, Stephen R.L.Clark argues that the genre of science fiction writing allows investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He reveals how fantasy accounts of issues such as resurrection, disembodied survival, reincarnation and devices or drugs for preserving life can be used as an important resource for philosophical inquiry and examines how a society of immortals (...)
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  20.  5
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1997). Animals and Their Moral Standing. Routledge.
    Twenty years ago, people thought only cranks or sentimentalists could be seriously concerned about the treatment of non-human animals. However, since then philosophers, scientists and welfarists have raised public awareness of the issue; and they have begun to lay the foundations for an enormous change in human practice. This book is a record of the development of 'animal rights' through the eyes of one highly-respected and well-known thinker. This book brings together for the first time Stephen R.L. Clark's major (...)
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  21. Stephen R. L. Clark (2006). Animals and Their Moral Standing. Routledge.
    Twenty years ago, people thought only cranks or sentimentalists could be seriously concerned about the treatment of non-human animals. However, since then philosophers, scientists and welfarists have raised public awareness of the issue; and they have begun to lay the foundations for an enormous change in human practice. This book is a record of the development of 'animal rights' through the eyes of one highly-respected and well-known thinker. This book brings together for the first time Stephen R.L. Clark's major (...)
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  22. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). God's World and the Great Awakening. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Stephen R.L. Clark defends the primary faith of humankind, that there is a real world which is more than a shadow of our desires and fancies, and which can be discovered through right reason. Focusing on the way in which we can "turn aside" to the Truth from the normal delusions of self-concern, Clark offers a properly worked, Platonic metaphysics as the key to identifying that reality. This book is the final volume of Limits and (...)
     
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  23.  18
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2006). G.K.Chesterton: Thinking Backward, Looking Forward. Templeton Foundation Press.
    Offering a detailed study of early 20th-century essayist, poet, novelist, political campaigner, and theologian G.K. Chesterton, author Stephen R.L. Clark ...
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  24. Stephen R. L. Clark (2015). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality is a subject which has long been explored and imagined by science fiction writers. In his intriguing new study, Stephen R.L.Clark argues that the genre of science fiction writing allows investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He reveals how fantasy accounts of issues such as resurrection, disembodied survival, reincarnation and devices or drugs for preserving life can be used as an important resource for philosophical inquiry and examines how a society of immortals (...)
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  25.  17
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2012). T.L.S. Sprigge, The Importance of Subjectivity: Selected Essays in Metaphysics and Ethics, Ed. B. McHenry Leemon. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2010, Xi + 356 Pp., £47. ISBN: 978-0-19-959154-1. [REVIEW] Philosophy 87 (02):310-315.
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  26.  5
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2015). PLOTINUS ON SELF. R. Mortley Plotinus, Self and the World. Pp. Viii + 153. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Cased, £50, US$85. ISBN: 978-1-107-04024-3. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (1):87-89.
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  27. S. R. L. Clark (1982). FREY, R. G. "Interests and Rights: The Case Against Animals". [REVIEW] Mind 91:459.
     
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  28.  52
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and hopes (...)
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  29. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). A Parliament of Souls. Oxford University Press.
    This second volume in the Limits and Renewals trilogy is an attempt to restate a traditional philosophy of mind, drawing on philosophical and poetical resources that are often neglected in modern and postmodern thought, and emphasizing the moral and political implications of differing philosophies of mind and value. Clark argues that without the traditional concept of the soul, we have little reason to believe that rational thought and individual autonomy are either possible or desirable. The particular topics covered include (...)
     
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  30.  17
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). Biology and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating and wide-ranging book mounts a profound enquiry into some of the most pressing questions of our age, by examining the relationship between biological science and Christianity. The history of biological discovery is explored from the point of view of a leading philosopher and ethicist. What effect should modern biological theory and practice have on Christian understanding of ethics? How much of that theory and practice should Christians endorse? Can Christians, for example, agree that biological changes are not governed (...)
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  31. Stephen R. L. Clark (1989). Civil Peace and Sacred Order. Oxford University Press.
    This book is an ambitious and challenging restatement of traditional political philosophy. The first of a three-volume series, Limits and Renewals, the book is concerned with the nature of political society, particularly with the errors and faulty arguments that have been used to support a "liberal modernist" view of the state and our political system. Clark argues that political modernism, which is determinedly secular and untraditional, has been a destructive influence on religion and our understanding of community living. In (...)
     
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  32. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). God's World and the Great Awakening: Limits and Renewals 3. Clarendon Press.
    In God's World and the Great Awakening, Professor Clark's main concern is with the way we can `turn aside' to the Truth from the normal delusions of self-concern. He restates a traditional, Neoplatonic metaphysics as the proper context for scientific and religious practice, and defends a serious Platonic realism against both scientism and anti-realism. Neither scientism, which identifies Truth with what can be revealed to the objectifying gaze, nor fashionable anti-realism, which equates Truth simply with what `we' choose to (...)
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  33. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). A Parliament of Souls: Limits and Renewals 2. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Limits and Renewals is a trilogy based on the Stanton Lectures in the Philosophy of Religion delivered at the University of Cambridge in 1986-8. In this, the second volume, Professor Clark attempts to restate a traditional philosophy of mind, drawing upon philosophical and poetic resources that are often neglected in modern and post-modern thought, and emphasizing the moral and political implications of differing `philosophies of mind and value'. He presents a study of the soul as it has traditionally been (...)
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  34. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). The Political Animal: Biology, Ethics and Politics. Routledge.
    People, as Aristotle said, are political animals. Mainstream political philosophy, however, has largely neglected humankind's animal nature as beings who are naturally equipped, and inclined, to reason and work together, create social bonds and care for their young. Stephen Clark, grounded in biological analysis and traditional ethics, probes into areas ignored in mainstream political theory and argues for the significance of social bonds which bypass or transcend state authority. Understanding the ties that bind us reveals how enormously capable we (...)
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  35. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). The Political Animal: Biology, Ethics and Politics. Routledge.
    People, as Aristotle said, are political animals. Mainstream political philosophy, however, has largely neglected humankind's animal nature as beings who are naturally equipped, and inclined, to reason and work together, create social bonds and care for their young. Stephen Clark, grounded in biological analysis and traditional ethics, probes into areas ignored in mainstream political theory and argues for the significance of social bonds which bypass or transcend state authority. Understanding the ties that bind us reveals how enormously capable we (...)
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  36.  71
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). The Political Animal: Biology, Ethics, and Politics. Routledge.
    In The Political Animal Stephen Clark investigates the political nature of the human animal. Based on biological science and traditional ethics, he probes into areas of inquiry that are usually ignored by traditional political theory. He suggests that properly informed political philosophy must take the role of women and children more seriously, and must be prepared to face up to the ethnocentric and domineering tendencies of the human animal.
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  37.  62
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1977). The Moral Status of Animals. Oxford University Press.
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  38. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Constructing Persons: The Psychopathology of Identity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):157-159.
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  39. Stephen R. L. Clark (1982). The Nature of the Beast: Are Animals Moral? Oxford University Press.
  40. S. R. L. Clark (2005). Review: Can a Darwinian Be a Christian? The Relationship Between Science and Religion. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (455):773-777.
  41.  98
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Philosophers and Popular Cosmology. Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (1):115-122.
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  42. S. R. L. Clark (1991). Book Review : Ethics After Babel, by Jeffrey Stout. Cambridge, James Clarke, 1990. Xiv + 338 Pp. 9.95. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (2):92-93.
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  43. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). Book Reviews : Environmental Ethics and Process Thinking, by Clare Palmer. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998. 243 Pp. Hb. 35. ISBN 0-19-826952-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 12 (2):89-91.
  44.  15
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1975). Aristotle's Man: Speculations Upon Aristotelian Anthropology. Clarendon Press.
    Words have determinable sense only within a complex of unstated assumptions, and all interpretation must therefore go beyond the given material. This book addresses what is man's place in the Aristotelian world. It also describes man's abilities and prospects in managing his life, and considers how far Aristotle's treatment of time and history licenses the sort of dynamic interpretation of his doctrines that have been given. The ontological model that explains much of Aristotle's conclusions and methods is one of life-worlds, (...)
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  45.  22
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2002). Feyerabend's Conquest of Abundance. Inquiry 45 (2):249 – 267.
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  46.  70
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1978). Animal Wrongs. Analysis 38 (3):147 - 149.
  47.  68
    S. R. L. Clark (2005). Book Review: Lying: An Augustinian Theology of Duplicity. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (3):151-153.
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  48.  38
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2008). Deconstructing the Laws of Logic. Philosophy 83 (1):25-53.
    I consider reasons for questioning 'the laws of logic' (identity, non-contradiction, excluded middle, and negation), and suggest that these laws do not accord with everyday reality. Either they are rhetorical tools rather than absolute truths, or else Plato and his successors were right to think that they identify a reality distinct from the ordinary world of experience, and also from the ultimate source of reality.
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  49.  63
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Book Review : Anarchy and Christianity by Jacques Ellul, Translated by G. W. Bromiley. Grand Rapids, Michigan, Eerdmans, 1988. Vi + 110pp. No Price. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 6 (1):52-55.
  50.  54
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). How to Believe in Fairies. Inquiry 30 (4):337 – 355.
    To believe in fairies is not to believe in rare Lepidoptera or the like, within a basically materialistic context. It is to take folk?stories seriously as accounts of the ?dreamworld?, the realm of conscious experience of which our ?waking world? is only a province, to acknowledge and make real to ourselves the presence of spirits that enter our consciousness as moods of love or alienation, wild joy or anger. In W. B. Yeats's philosophy fairies are the moods and characters of (...)
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