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  1. Stuart G. Shanker (forthcoming). Wittgenstein's Solution of the 'Hermeneutic Problem'. Conceptus.
    There is a striking parallel between w v o quine's 'indeterminacy of translation' thesis and k o apel's 'indeterminacy of textual interpretation thesis. both arguments are based on what is essentially the same 'sceptical dilemma'. the key to resolving these 'hermeneutic problems' is to recognize that such a 'sceptical problem' is unintelligible. this is precisely the point of wittgenstein's discussions of rule-following. many have misunderstood this, however, for they have misconstrued what was intended to be read as a "reductio ad (...)
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  2. Stuart G. Shanker & Stanley I. Greenspan (2005). The Role of Affect in Language Development. Theoria 20 (3):329-343.
    This paper presents the Functional/Emotional approach to language development, which explains the process leading up to the core capacities necessary for language (e.g., pattern-recognition, joint attention); shows how this process leads to the formation of internal symbols; and how it shapes and is shaped by the child’s development of language. The heart of this approach is that, through a series of affective transformations, a child develops these core capacities and the capacity to form meaningful symbols. Far from being a sudden (...)
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  3. Stuart G. Shanker (2004). Autism and the Dynamic Developmental Model of Emotions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (3):219-233.
  4. Stuart G. Shanker (2004). A Picture Held Me Captive. In Erich Ammereller & Eugen Fisher (eds.), Wittgenstein at Work: Method in the Philosophical Investigations. Routledge.
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  5. Stuart G. Shanker & Talbot J. Taylor (2004). The Significance of Ape Language Research. In Christina E. Erneling (ed.), The Mind as a Scientific Object: Between Brain and Culture. Oxford University Press. 367.
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  6. Stuart G. Shanker (ed.) (2003). Philosophy of Science, Logic and Mathematics in the 20th Century: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume 9. Routledge.
    The twentieth century witnessed the birth of analytic philosophy. This volume covers some of its key movements and philosophers, including Frege and Wittgenstein's Tractatus.
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  7. Stuart G. Shanker & Barbara J. King (2002). The Emergence of a New Paradigm in Ape Language Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):605-620.
    In recent years we have seen a dramatic shift, in several different areas of communication studies, from an information-theoretic to a dynamic systems paradigm. In an information processing system, communication, whether between cells, mammals, apes, or humans, is said to occur when one organism encodes information into a signal that is transmitted to another organism that decodes the signal. In a dynamic system, all of the elements are continuously interacting with and changing in respect to one another, and an aggregate (...)
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  8. David Bakhurst & Stuart G. Shanker (2001). Introduction: Bruner's Way. In David Bakhurst & Stuart Shanker (eds.), Jerome Bruner: Language, Culture, Self. Sage. 1--18.
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  9. Stuart G. Shanker & Talbot J. Taylor (2001). The House That Bruner Built. In David Bakhurst & Stuart Shanker (eds.), Jerome Bruner: Language, Culture, Self. Sage. 50--70.
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  10. Stuart G. Shanker (1995). The Nature of Insight. Minds and Machines 5 (4):561-581.
    The Greeks had a ready answer for what happens when the mind suddenly finds the answer to a question for which it had been searching: insight was regarded as a gift of the Muses, its origins were divine. It served to highlight the Greeks'' belief that there are some things which are not meant to be scientifically explained. The essence of insight is that it comes from some supernatural source: unpredicted and unfettered. In other words, the origins of insight are (...)
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  11. Stuart G. Shanker (1988). The Dawning of Intelligence. Philosophica 42.
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  12. Stuart G. Shanker (1984). Sceptical Confusions About Rule-Following. Mind 93 (July):423-29.