1. James Ladyman, Stuart Presnell & Anthony J. Short (2008). The Use of the Information-Theoretic Entropy in Thermodynamics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (2):315-324.
    When considering controversial thermodynamic scenarios such as Maxwell's demon, it is often necessary to consider probabilistic mixtures of states. This raises the question of how, if at all, to assign entropy to them. The information-theoretic entropy is often used in such cases; however, no general proof of the soundness of doing so has been given, and indeed some arguments against doing so have been presented. We offer a general proof of the applicability of the information-theoretic entropy to probabilistic mixtures of (...)
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  2. James Ladyman, Stuart Presnell, Anthony J. Short & Berry Groisman (2007). The Connection Between Logical and Thermodynamic Irreversibility. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (1):58-79.
    There has recently been a good deal of controversy about Landauer's Principle, which is often stated as follows: The erasure of one bit of information in a computational device is necessarily accompanied by a generation of kTln2 heat. This is often generalised to the claim that any logically irreversible operation cannot be implemented in a thermodynamically reversible way. John Norton (2005) and Owen Maroney (2005) both argue that Landauer's Principle has not been shown to hold in general, and Maroney offers (...)
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  3. Tony Short, James Ladyman, Berry Groisman & Stuart Presnell, The Connection Between Logical and Thermodynamical Irreversibility.
    There has recently been a good deal of controversy about Landauer's Principle, which is often stated as follows: The erasure of one bit of information in a computational device is necessarily accompanied by a generation of kT ln 2 heat. This is often generalised to the claim that any logically irreversible operation cannot be implemented in a thermodynamically reversible way. John Norton (2005) and Owen Maroney (2005) both argue that Landauer's Principle has not been shown to hold in general, and (...)
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