Search results for 'Stuart S. Nagel' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles E. Trinkaus, Ernest Nagel, Arthur O. Lovejoy & V. J. McGill (1937). Four Letters on Ernest Nagel's Review of Lovejoy's "The Great Chain of Being". Science and Society 1 (3):410 - 416.score: 390.0
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  2. Stuart S. Nagel (1992). What's New and Useful in Law Analysis Technology? Ratio Juris 5 (2):172-190.score: 380.0
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  3. S. R. Peterson, Ernest Nagel & James R. Newman (1961). Godel's Proof. Philosophical Quarterly 11 (45):379.score: 330.0
    In 1931 the mathematical logician Kurt Godel published a revolutionary paper that challenged certain basic assumptions underpinning mathematics and logic. A colleague of Albert Einstein, his theorem proved that mathematics was partly based on propositions not provable within the mathematical system and had radical implications that have echoed throughout many fields. A gripping combination of science and accessibility, Godel’s Proof by Nagel and Newman is for both mathematicians and the idly curious, offering those with a taste for logic and (...)
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  4. Stuart S. Nagel (1993). Legal Scholarship, Microcomputers, and Super-Optimizing Decision-Making. Quorum Books.score: 290.0
     
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  5. Ernest Nagel (1958). Gödel's Proof. [New York]New York University Press.score: 180.0
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  6. Thomas Nagel (1986). The View From Nowhere. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    Human beings have the unique ability to view the world in a detached way: We can think about the world in terms that transcend our own experience or interest, and consider the world from a vantage point that is, in Nagel's words, "nowhere in particular". At the same time, each of us is a particular person in a particular place, each with his own "personal" view of the world, a view that we can recognize as just one aspect of (...)
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  7. Thomas Nagel (1989). Fredom and the View From Nowhere. In , The View From Nowhere. Oup.score: 150.0
    _The opening paragraphs of Nagel's book_ _The View from Nowhere_ _(the first five_ _paragraphs below) indicate the general distinction he proposes between an_ _individual's subjective view of things or subjective standpoint as against an objective_ _or external view of things that is nobody's in particular._.
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  8. Thomas Nagel (1995). Other Minds: Critical Essays, 1969-1994. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    Over the past twenty-five years, Thomas Nagel has played a major role in the philosophico-biological debate on subjectivity and consciousness. This extensive collection of published essays and reviews offers Nagel's opinionated views on the philosophy of mind, epistemology, and political philosophy, as well as on fellow philosophers like Freud, Wittgenstein, Rawls, Dennet, Chomsky, Searle, Nozick, Dworkin, and MacIntyre.
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  9. Ernest Nagel (1981). The Dimensions of Cohen's Legal Philosophy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 17 (2):98 - 106.score: 150.0
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  10. Thomas Nagel (1959). Hobbes's Concept of Obligation. Philosophical Review 68 (1):68-83.score: 120.0
  11. Jennifer Nagel (2013). Motivating Williamson's Model Gettier Cases. Inquiry 56 (1):54-62.score: 120.0
    Williamson has a strikingly economical way of showing how justified true belief can fail to constitute knowledge: he models a class of Gettier cases by means of two simple constraints. His constraints can be shown to rely on some unstated assumptions about the relationship between reality and appearance. These assumptions are epistemologically non-trivial but can be defended as plausible idealizations of our actual predicament, in part because they align well with empirical work on the metacognitive dimension of experience.
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  12. Ernest Nagel & James R. Newman (1961). Putnam's Review of Gödel's Proof. Philosophy of Science 28 (2):209-211.score: 120.0
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  13. Gordon Nagel (1979). Review: Brittan, Kant's Theory of Science. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 46 (4):654-.score: 120.0
  14. Peg Brand, Myles Brand, G. E. M. Anscombe, Donald Davidson, John M. Dolan, Peter T. Geach, Thomas Nagel, Barry R. Gross, Nebojsa Kujundzic, Jon K. Mills, Stephen Lester Thompson, Richard J. McGowan, Jennifer Uleman, John D. Musselman, James S. Stramel, Parker English & Torin Alter (1995). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (2):119 - 131.score: 120.0
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  15. Ernest Nagel (1940). Charles S. Peirce, Pioneer of Modern Empiricism. Philosophy of Science 7 (1):69-80.score: 120.0
  16. Bruno Nagel (1997). Review: A New Approach to Comparative Philosophy Through Ulrich Libbrecht's Comparative Model. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 47 (1):75 - 78.score: 120.0
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  17. Mechthild Nagel (2007). Scholar's Symposium: The Work of Angela Y. Davis. [REVIEW] Human Studies 30 (4):281-290.score: 120.0
  18. Evander Bradley McGilvary, G. Watts Cunningham, C. I. Lewis & Ernest Nagel (1939). A Symposium of Reviews of John Dewey's Logic: The Theory of Inquiry. Journal of Philosophy 36 (21):561-581.score: 120.0
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  19. Ernest Nagel (1933). Charles Peirce's Guesses at the Riddle. Journal of Philosophy 30 (14):365-386.score: 120.0
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  20. Christopher Nagel (2000). Hegel's Ethics of Recognition. The Owl of Minerva 31 (2):211-218.score: 120.0
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  21. Gordon Nagel (1985). Kant's Theory of Mind. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (4):681-693.score: 120.0
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  22. Ernest Nagel (1945). Professor Ducasse's Criterion of Truth. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 5 (3):333-337.score: 120.0
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  23. Ernest Nagel (1944). Rejoinder to Mr. Kaufmann's Reply. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 5 (1):75-79.score: 120.0
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  24. D. W. Brock, D. Callahan, D. S. Diekema, R. Dworkin, T. Nagel, R. Nozick, J. Rawls, T. Scanlon, J. J. Thomson & J. J. Fins (2005). A Favorites Reading List From the Cambridge Consortium for Bioethics Education. Ethics 14 (2):141-6.score: 120.0
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  25. Leopold Lowenheim, S. C. Kleene, Paul Bernays, Saunders MacLane, Ernest Nagel, Albert Wohlstetter, J. C. C. McKinsey, Charles A. Baylis, Carl G. Hempel & C. H. Langford (2013). The Journal of Symbolic Logic Publishes Original Scholarly Work in Symbolic Logic. Founded in 1936, It has Become the Leading Research Journal in the Field. The Journal Aims to Represent Logic Broadly, Including its Connections with Mathematics and Philosophy as Well as Newer Aspects Related to Computer Science and Linguistics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 43 (44).score: 120.0
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  26. D. Z. Nagel, E. V. Savigny, C. Taylor, B. Tilghman & S. Toulmin (1995). Announcement and Call for Papers: The Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society is to Hold the 18th International Wittgenstein Symposium From 13 to 20 August 1995 at Kirchberg Am Wechsel (Austria). The Title of the Symposium Will Be. [REVIEW] Human Studies 17 (480):479-482.score: 120.0
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  27. Thomas Nagel & Brenda Almond (forthcoming). Editor's Booknotes. Cogito.score: 120.0
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  28. Ernest Nagel (1938). Review: B. A. Bernstein, Remark on Nicod's Reduction of Principia Mathematica. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 3 (1):50-50.score: 120.0
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  29. Kai Nagel (1996). Comment On: B. S. Kerner and H. Rehborn, Experimental Properties of Complexity in Traffic Flow, Physical Review E 53(5) R4275 (1996). [REVIEW] Complexity 2 (2):8-8.score: 120.0
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  30. Ernest Nagel (1940). Dewey's Reconstruction of Logical Theory. In John Dewey (ed.), The Philosopher of the Common Man. New York, Greenwood Press.score: 120.0
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  31. Ernest Nagel (1950). Dewey's Theory of Natural Science. In Sidney Hook (ed.), John Dewey: Philosopher of Science and Freedom: A Symposium. Dial Press. 231--48.score: 120.0
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  32. Christopher P. Nagel (1997). Heglianism in Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of History. Philosophy Today 41 (2):288-298.score: 120.0
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  33. Ernest Nagel (1943). Review: Arthur W. Burks, Peirce's Conception of Logic as a Normative Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 8 (1):49-49.score: 120.0
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  34. Ernest Nagel (1940). Review: J. C. C. McKinsey, A Note on Reichenbach's Axioms for Probability Implication. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 5 (1):42-42.score: 120.0
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  35. Ernest Nagel (1944). Review: James Feibleman, A Reply to Bertrand Russell's Introduction to the Second Edition of The Principles of Mathematics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 9 (3):77-78.score: 120.0
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  36. Ernest Nagel (1944). Review: Max Black, Russell's Philosophy of Language. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 9 (3):78-79.score: 120.0
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  37. Gordon Nagel (1983). The Structure of Experience: Kant's System of Principles. University of Chicago Press.score: 120.0
  38. Andreas Sprenger, Monique Friedrich, Matthias Nagel, Christiane S. Ma Schmidt, Steffen Moritz & Rebekka Lencer (2013). Advanced Analysis of Free Visual Exploration Patterns in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 120.0
    Background: Visual scanpath analyses provide important information about attention allocation and attention shifting during visual exploration of social situations. This study investigated whether patients with schizophrenia simply show restricted free visual exploration behaviour reflected by reduced saccade frequency and increased fixation duration or whether patients use qualitatively different exploration strategies than healthy controls. Methods: Scanpaths of 32 patients with schizophrenia and age-matched 33 healthy controls were assessed while participants freely explored six photos of daily life situations (20 seconds/photo) evaluated for (...)
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  39. Thomas Nagel (1974). What is It Like to Be a Bat? Philosophical Review 83 (October):435-50.score: 90.0
  40. Michael Gorman (2005). Nagasawa Vs. Nagel: Omnipotence, Pseudo-Tasks, and a Recent Discussion of Nagel's Doubts About Physicalism. Inquiry 48 (5):436 – 447.score: 72.0
    In his recent "Thomas vs. Thomas: A New Approach to Nagel's Bat Argument", Yujin Nagasawa interprets Thomas Nagel as making a certain argument against physicalism and objects that this argument transgresses a principle, laid down by Thomas Aquinas, according to which inability to perform a pseudo-task does not count against an omnipotence claim. Taking Nagasawa's interpretation of Nagel for granted, I distinguish different kinds of omnipotence claims and different kinds of pseudo-tasks, and on that basis show that (...)
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  41. Jennifer Nagel (2007). Epistemic Intuitions. Philosophy Compass 2 (6):792–819.score: 60.0
    We naturally evaluate the beliefs of others, sometimes by deliberate calculation, and sometimes in a more immediate fashion. Epistemic intuitions are immediate assessments arising when someone’s condition appears to fall on one side or the other of some significant divide in epistemology. After giving a rough sketch of several major features of epistemic intuitions, this article reviews the history of the current philosophical debate about them and describes the major positions in that debate. Linguists and psychologists also study epistemic assessments; (...)
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  42. Jennifer Nagel (2013). Defending the Evidential Value of Epistemic Intuitions: A Reply to Stich. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):179-199.score: 60.0
    Do epistemic intuitions tell us anything about knowledge? Stich has argued that we respond to cases according to our contingent cultural programming, and not in a manner that tends to reveal anything significant about knowledge itself. I’ve argued that a cross-culturally universal capacity for mindreading produces the intuitive sense that the subject of a case has or lacks knowledge. This paper responds to Stich’s charge that mindreading is cross-culturally varied in a way that will strip epistemic intuitions of their evidential (...)
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  43. Jennifer Nagel (forthcoming). Knowledge and Reliability. In Hilary Kornblith & Brian McLaughlin (eds.), Alvin Goldman and his Critics. Blackwell.score: 60.0
    Internalists have criticised reliabilism for overlooking the importance of the subject's point of view in the generation of knowledge. This paper argues that there is a troubling ambiguity in the intuitive examples that internalists have used to make their case, and on either way of resolving this ambiguity, reliabilism is untouched. However, the argument used to defend reliabilism against the internalist cases could also be used to defend a more radical form of externalism in epistemology.
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  44. Jennifer Nagel (2011). The Psychological Basis of the Harman-Vogel Paradox. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (5):1-28.score: 60.0
    Harman’s lottery paradox, generalized by Vogel to a number of other cases, involves a curious pattern of intuitive knowledge ascriptions: certain propositions seem easier to know than various higher-probability propositions that are recognized to follow from them. For example, it seems easier to judge that someone knows his car is now on Avenue A, where he parked it an hour ago, than to judge that he knows that it is not the case that his car has been stolen and driven (...)
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  45. Jennifer Nagel (forthcoming). Sensitive Knowledge: Locke on Sensation and Skepticism. In Matthew Stuart (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Locke. Blackwell.score: 60.0
    In the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke insists that all knowledge consists in perception of the agreement or disagreement of ideas. However, he also insists that knowledge extends to outer reality, claiming that perception yields ‘sensitive knowledge’ of the existence of outer objects. Some scholars have argued that Locke did not really mean to restrict knowledge to perceptions of relations within the realm of ideas; others have argued that sensitive knowledge is not strictly speaking a form of knowledge for Locke. (...)
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  46. Jennifer Nagel (2012). Gendler on Alief. [REVIEW] Analysis 72 (4):774-788.score: 60.0
    Contribution to a book symposium on Tamar Gendler's Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology.
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  47. Jennifer Nagel (2008). Knowledge Ascriptions and the Psychological Consequences of Changing Stakes. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (2):279-294.score: 60.0
    Why do our intuitive knowledge ascriptions shift when a subject's practical interests are mentioned? Many efforts to answer this question have focused on empirical linguistic evidence for context sensitivity in knowledge claims, but the empirical psychology of belief formation and attribution also merits attention. The present paper examines a major psychological factor (called ?need-for-closure?) relevant to ascriptions involving practical interests. Need-for-closure plays an important role in determining whether one has a settled belief; it also influences the accuracy of one's cognition. (...)
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  48. Thomas Nagel (1972). War and Massacre. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (2):123-144.score: 60.0
    From the apathetic reaction to atrocities committed in Vietnam by the United States and its allies, one may conclude that moral restrictions on the conduct of war command almost as little sympathy among the general public as they do among those charged with the formation of U.S. military policy. Even when restrictions on the conduct of warfare are defended, it is usually on legal grounds alone: their moral basis is often poorly understood. I wish to argue that certain restrictions are (...)
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  49. Jennifer Nagel (2012). The Attitude of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (3):678-685.score: 60.0
    Contribution to a symposium on Keith DeRose's The Case for Contextualism, Volume 1.
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  50. Jennifer Nagel (forthcoming). The Social Value of Reasoning. Episteme.score: 60.0
    When and why does it matter whether we can give an explicit justification for what we believe? This paper examines these questions in the light of recent empirical work on the social functions served by our capacity to reason, in particular, Mercier and Sperber’s argumentative theory of reasoning.
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