Search results for 'Subalternation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Dale Jacquette (2016). Subalternation and Existence Presuppositions in an Unconventionally Formalized Canonical Square of Opposition. Logica Universalis 10 (2-3):191-213.
    An unconventional formalization of the canonical square of opposition in the notation of classical symbolic logic secures all but one of the canonical square’s grid of logical interrelations between four A-E-I-O categorical sentence types. The canonical square is first formalized in the functional calculus in Frege’s Begriffsschrift, from which it can be directly transcribed into the syntax of contemporary symbolic logic. Difficulties in received formalizations of the canonical square motivate translating I categoricals, ‘Some S is P’, into symbolic logical notation, (...)
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  2.  3
    Bernard Mullahy (1946). Subalternation and Mathematical Physics. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 2 (2):89.
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  3.  4
    William A. Wallace (1996). Antonius de Carlenis OP, Four Questions on the Subalternation of the Sciences, Ed. And Trans. Steven J. Livesey.(Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 84/4.) Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1994. Paper. Pp. Xliv, 74 (Page Nos. 4–52 Repeated). [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):386-386.
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  4.  2
    S. Livesey (1994). Robert Graystanes OSB on the Subalternation of Sciences. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 61:136-172.
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  5.  12
    Henry Bradford Smith (1924). A Further Note on Subalternation and the Disputed Syllogistic Moods. Journal of Philosophy 21 (23):631-633.
  6.  2
    William Wallace (1996). Four Questions on the Subalternation of the Sciences. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):386-386.
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  7.  7
    Henry Bradford Smith (1919). Note on the Relation of Subalternation. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (19):522-523.
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  8.  1
    John Boler (1991). John of Reading, Theology and Science in the Fourteenth Century: Three Questions on the Unity and Subalternation of the Sciences From John of Reading's Commentary on the Sentences, Ed. Steven J. Livesey.(Studien Und Texte Zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters, 25.) Leiden: EJ Brill, 1989. Paper. Pp. Viii, 229; 5 Black-and-White Figures. Hfl 120. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (2):427-428.
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  9. John Boler (1991). Theology and Science in the Fourteenth Century: Three Questions on the Unity and Subalternation of the Sciences From John of Reading's Commentary on the Sentences. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (2):427-428.
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  10. W. R. Laird (1995). Antonius de Carlensis, O.P.: Four Questions on the Subalternation of the SciencesAntonius de Carlensis Steven J. Livesey. [REVIEW] Isis 86 (3):479-480.
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  11. Helen Lang (1993). Theology and Science in the Fourteenth Century: Three Questions on the Unity and Subalternation of the Sciences From John of Reading's Commentary on the Sentences by Steven J. Livesey. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 84:370-371.
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  12. William A. Wallace (1996). Four Questions on the Subalternation of the Sciences.Antonius de Carlenis Steven J. Livesey. Speculum 71 (2):386-386.
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  13.  58
    Zvi Biener (forthcoming). Hobbes on the Order of Sciences: A Partial Defense of the Mathematization Thesis. Southern Journal of Philosophy.
    Accounts of Hobbes’s ‘system’ of sciences oscillate between two extremes. On one extreme, the system is portrayed as wholly axiomtic-deductive, with statecraft being deduced in an unbroken chain from the principles of logic and first philosophy. On the other, it is portrayed as rife with conceptual cracks and fissures, with Hobbes’s statements about its deductive structure amounting to mere window-dressing. This paper argues that a middle way is found by conceiving of Hobbes’s _Elements of Philosophy_ on the model of a (...)
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  14.  24
    Monte Ransome Johnson (2009). The Aristotelian Explanation of the Halo. Apeiron 42 (4):325-357.
    For an Aristotelian observer, the halo is a puzzling phenomenon since it is apparently sublunary, and yet perfectly circular. This paper studies Aristotle's explanation of the halo in Meteorology III 2-3 as an optical illusion, as opposed to a substantial thing (like a cloud), as was thought by his predecessors and even many successors. Aristotle's explanation follows the method of explanation of the Posterior Analytics for "subordinate" or "mixed" mathematical-physical sciences. The accompanying diagram described by Aristotle is one of the (...)
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  15.  24
    Author unknown, Square of Opposition. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  16.  37
    J. L. A. West (2007). The Functioning of Philosophy in Aquinas. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):383-394.
    : I argue that for Aquinas philosophy is a necessary tool of theology and that philosophy is not changed by its theological context. Rather, the subalternation of disciplines results in a reciprocal relation between philosophy and theology. This is understood in terms of the distinction between what is better known in itself and what is better known to us. This view is defended by (1) reinterpreting Aquinas' use of the metaphor of the water of philosophy being transformed into the (...)
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  17.  22
    Andrew Schumann (2013). On Two Squares of Opposition: The Leśniewski's Style Formalization of Synthetic Propositions. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 28 (1):71-93.
    In the paper we build up the ontology of Leśniewski’s type for formalizing synthetic propositions. We claim that for these propositions an unconventional square of opposition holds, where a, i are contrary, a, o (resp. e, i) are contradictory, e, o are subcontrary, a, e (resp. i, o) are said to stand in the subalternation. Further, we construct a non-Archimedean extension of Boolean algebra and show that in this algebra just two squares of opposition are formalized: conventional and the (...)
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  18.  19
    Steven J. Livesey (1990). Science and Theology in the Fourteenth Century: The Subalternate Sciences in Oxford Commentaries on the Sentences. Synthese 83 (2):273 - 292.
    Both Pierre Duhem and his successors emphasized that medieval scholastics created a science of mechanics by bringing both observation and mathematical techniques to bear on natural effects. Recent research into medieval and early modern science has suggested that Aristotle's subalternate sciences also were used in this program, although the degree to which the theory of subalternation had been modified is still not entirely clear. This paper focuses on the English tradition of subalternation between 1310 and 1350, and concludes (...)
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  19.  10
    Carla Bromberg (2014). Os Objetos da Música E da Matemática E a Subalternação Das Ciências Em Alguns Tratados de Música Do Século XVI. Trans/Form/Ação 37 (1):9-30.
    Sabe-se que, durante alguns períodos da história, a Música e a Matemática foram ciências que compartilharam seus conceitos e discussões. Um dos períodos no qual essa comunhão se deu de maneira significativa foi o Renascimento. A Música era então classificada como ciência e, pertencendo ao grupo das matemáticas, dividia seu espaço com a Aritmética, a quem era subordinada, com a Geometria e a Astronomia. Essa divisão foi transmitida através das obras do filósofo Sevério N. Boécio e prevaleceu durante o século (...)
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  20.  8
    Pasquale Porro (2012). Dalla pagina alla scientia. L’identificazione tra libri e sapere scientifico nel Medioevo scolastico e il caso anomalo della teologia. Quaestio 11 (1):225-253.
    The official documents of the Parisian Faculty of Arts show a close identification between the philosophical sciences and the corresponding textbooks: to learn a particular science means essentially to read certain, prescribed books. The case of theology seems to be different, however. In spite of the fact that the Bible served as a paradigm for the ‘textualization’ of all kinds of knowledge, and even of the whole world, it did not fit perfectly the epistemological criteria which Aristotle’s Posterior analytics established (...)
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  21.  2
    James Wilkinson Miller (1938). The Structure of Aristotelian Logic. London, K. Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co., Ltd..
    Originally published in 1938. This compact treatise is a complete treatment of Aristotle’s logic as containing negative terms. It begins with defining Aristotelian logic as a subject-predicate logic confining itself to the four forms of categorical proposition known as the A, E, I and O forms. It assigns conventional meanings to these categorical forms such that subalternation holds. It continues to discuss the development of the logic since the time of its founder and address traditional logic as it existed (...)
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  22.  11
    M. V. Dougherty (2003). On the Alleged Subalternate Character of Sacra Doctrina in Aquinas. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:101-110.
    Largely uncontested among interpreters of Aquinas is the claim that the Angelic Doctor presents sacra doctrina as a subalternated science. To be sure, in fourtexts of the Thomistic corpus Aquinas broaches the subject of subalternation in discussions of whether sacra doctrina can be a science. I contend that the appeal to subalternation in these discussions is not to defend sacra doctrina as a subalternated science, but is rather to defend the possibility of arriving at scientific conclusions when an (...)
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  23.  10
    Roger Ariew (1990). Christopher Clavius and the Classification of Sciences. Synthese 83 (2):293 - 300.
    I discuss two questions: (1) would Duhem have accepted the thesis of the continuity of scientific methodology? and (2) to what extent is the Oxford tradition of classification/subalternation of sciences continuous with early modern science? I argue that Duhem would have been surprised by the claim that scientific methodology is continuous; he expected at best only a continuity of physical theories, which he was trying to isolate from the perpetual fluctuations of methods and metaphysics. I also argue that the (...)
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  24.  10
    Yorick Wilks (1990). Christopher Clavius and the Classification of Sciences. Synthese 83 (2):293-300.
    I discuss two questions: (1) would Duhem have accepted the thesis of the continuity of scientific methodology? and (2) to what extent is the Oxford tradition of classification/subalternation of sciences continuous with early modern science? I argue that Duhem would have been surprised by the claim that scientific methodology is continuous; he expected at best only a continuity of physical theories, which he was trying to isolate from the perpetual fluctuations of methods and metaphysics. I also argue that the (...)
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  25. James Wilkinson Miller (2015). The Structure of Aristotelian Logic. Routledge.
    Originally published in 1938. This compact treatise is a complete treatment of Aristotle’s logic as containing negative terms. It begins with defining Aristotelian logic as a subject-predicate logic confining itself to the four forms of categorical proposition known as the _A, E, I _and_ O_ forms. It assigns conventional meanings to these categorical forms such that subalternation holds. It continues to discuss the development of the logic since the time of its founder and address traditional logic as it existed (...)
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