Search results for 'Subculture' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nikola Bozilovic (2006). Identity and the Meaning of Style in Subculture. Filozofija I Drustvo 30:233-250.score: 15.0
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  2. Ji soo Ha & Judy Park (2010). Significance of Changing Korean Youth Subculture Styles. Asian Culture and History 3 (1):p23.score: 12.0
    Subcultures are cultures formed by a social minority group that does not belong to the mainstream, and youth subcultures are subcultures specifically of youths. Youth subcultures have distinct clothing styles that differentiate them from popular culture and through which they express their values and individuality. Korea has a short history of subcultures, but it has quickly formed numerous unique subcultures influenced both by existing subcultures of Euro-America and Korean society. The purpose of this research was to examine Korean youth (...) styles in terms of how they have evolved in a short period of time and how they have been affected by foreign and domestic elements. It provides insight on the symbolization of Korean youth subculture styles and how the changing styles reflect the state of mind and values of Korean youths today. (shrink)
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  3. BaoChun Zhao & ShanShan Xu (2013). Does Consumer Unethical Behavior Relate to Birthplace? Evidence From China. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):475-488.score: 9.0
    This study explores the relationship between individual birthplace [rural birthplace (RB) and urban birthplace (UB)] and consumer unethical behavior (CUB). As a result, CUB is verified to closely relate to individual birthplace, and those new urban residents with RB are found to behave more ethically than the patrimonial urban residents with UB in CUB4 (“no harm/no foul”). This study also finds that the differentiation of CUB between two categories of consumers is correlated with the personal moral ideology or Machiavellianism (MA) (...)
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  4. Helga Botermann (1980). Polish Miners in the Ruhr Area, 1870–1945. Social Integration of a Minority in German Industrial Society and Development of a National Subculture. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 13 (2):219-221.score: 9.0
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  5. Marco Santoro (2000). Mafia, Cultura E Subculture. Polis 14 (1):91-112.score: 9.0
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  6. Susan Willis (1993). Hardcore: Subculture American Style. Critical Inquiry 19 (2):365.score: 9.0
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  7. Tim Cloudsley (2007). After Subculture. The European Legacy 12 (3):361-364.score: 9.0
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  8. Victoria Pitts (1999). Body Modification, Self-Mutilation and Agency in Media Accounts of a Subculture. Body and Society 5 (2-3):291-303.score: 9.0
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  9. Ziad Swaidan (2012). Culture and Consumer Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):201-213.score: 6.0
    Disparity in consumer ethics reflects cultural variations; these are differences in the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes one culture from another. This study explores the differences in consumer ethics across cultural dimensions using Hofstede's (in Culture's consequences: international differences in work-related values, Sage, Beverly Hills, 1980) model (collectivism, masculinity, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance) and Muncy and Vitell (in J Bus Res 24(4): 297-311, 1992) consumer ethics model (i.e., illegal, active, passive, and no harm). This is the first (...)
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  10. T. J. Berard (forthcoming). The Study of Deviant Subcultures as a Longstanding and Evolving Site of Intersecting Membership Categorizations. Human Studies:1-18.score: 6.0
    Intersectional scholarship has become increasingly important, largely because it is more nuanced than scholarship emphasizing only class, race, or gender. Much intersectional scholarship is limiting, however, in curtailing our conceptualizations of how many intersecting identities might be relevant for explaining crime. The older literature on deviant subcultures, including gang studies, actually addressed issues of intersectionality, and in a less restrictive manner, also acknowledging the importance of youth and neighborhood ecology. Drawing on early and more recent subcultural scholarship, the theoretical importance (...)
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  11. Paul Cooke & Helen Vassallo (eds.) (2009). Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts. Peter Lang.score: 6.0
    The essays in this collection, which derive from the conference 'Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts', held at the University of Exeter in September 2007, explore various aspects of this ...
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  12. Richard Olson (2011). A Dynamic Model for “Science and Religion”: Interacting Subcultures. Zygon 46 (1):65-83.score: 4.0
    Abstract: I argue that for psychological and social reasons, the traditional “Conflict Model” of science and religion interactions has such a strong hold on the nonexpert imagination that counterexamples and claims that interactions are simply more complex than the model allows are inadequate to undermine its power. Taxonomies, such as those of Ian Barbour and John Haught, which characterize conflict as only one among several possible relationships, help. But these taxonomies, by themselves, fail to offer an account of why different (...)
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  13. James Steele (1998). Honour Subcultures and the Reciprocal Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):385-386.score: 4.0
    Tests of models of reciprocal interactions of testosterone and behaviour patterns in honour subcultures, if based on adult samples measured at a single point in time, would be aided by measures of behaviour in such samples that indirectly index basal testosterone levels at earlier developmental ages, for example, hand preference and other measures of cerebral dominance. Such models raise questions about the social preconditions of honour subcultures, and their indirect effects on health.
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  14. Safiek Mokhlis (2012). An Empirical Analysis of Consumer Product Evaluation From an Ethnic Subcultural Perspective. Asian Culture and History 4 (2):p69.score: 4.0
    One of the most significant cultural manifestations in buyer behavior may be the way in which a product is evaluated as a function of its various attributes. People from different cultures have different experiences and value structures which may cause them to view products differently. This purpose of this study was to examine variation in product evaluation across three consumer ethnic subcultures in Malaysia: Malay, Chinese, and Indian. Mobile phone was chosen as the target product in this study. Exploratory factor (...)
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  15. Bob Plant (2007). Playing Games/Playing Us: Foucault on Sadomasochism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (5):531-561.score: 3.0
    The impact of Foucault's work can still be felt across a range of academic disciplines. It is nevertheless important to remember that, for him, theoretical activity was intimately related to the concrete practices of self-transformation; as he acknowledged: `I write in order to change myself.' 1 This avowal is especially pertinent when considering Foucault's work on the relationship between sex and power. For Foucault not only theorized about this topic; he was also actively involved in the S&M subculture of (...)
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  16. John Manzo (2010). Coffee, Connoisseurship, and an Ethnomethodologically-Informed Sociology of Taste. Human Studies 33 (2):141-155.score: 3.0
    Coffee is an important commodity and an important comestible, one that is momentous not only for nations’ economies but also, at the micro-social level, as a resource for interpersonal sociability. Among a subculture of certain coffee connoisseurs, the coffee itself is a topic that is an organizing focus of, and for, that sociability. This paper is an empirical investigation of online narratives produced by hobbyist participants in what coffee aficionados refer to as the third wave coffee phenomenon and engages (...)
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  17. Jack Coulehan (2011). "A Gentle and Humane Temper" Humility in Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):206-216.score: 3.0
    In his story entitled "Toenails," the surgeon Richard Selzer (1982) warns readers that total immersion in medicine is wrongheaded. Rather, to ensure their own health, doctors should discover other passions that permit them periodically to disconnect from medical practice. Selzer's surgeon character devotes his Wednesday afternoons to the public library, where he joins "a subculture of elderly men and women who gather … to read or sleep beneath the world's newspapers" (p. 69). Among these often eccentric personages is Neckerchief, (...)
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  18. Thomas Hofweber (2010). Inferential Role and the Ideal of Deductive Logic. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 5 (1).score: 3.0
    There is a substantial question in the philosophy of language whether understanding a language involves knowledge of some metalinguistic facts about words. Does understanding a language in part consist in knowing what the words in that language mean? Most of the debate about this topic is carried out in the philosophy of language proper, where it seems to belong.1 But recently a subculture of philosophers has emerged who have argued that one of the lessons we must draw from issues (...)
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  19. John Hagan (2004). Twin Towers, Iron Cages and the Culture of Control. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (2):42-48.score: 3.0
    David Garland?s The Culture of Control tells us more about the political culture of a post?11 September world than even he must have anticipated. The core of Garland?s cultural argument is his elaboration of a Durkheimian concept of moral individualism, to which he attributes a trend?setting influence lasting into the new millennium. He argues that, among youth, this new cultural influence has an egoistic, hedonistic quality, linked to a non?stop consumption ethos of the new capitalism. He emphasises that it is (...)
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  20. John Marmysz (2013). The Lure of the Mob: Contemporary Cinematic Depictions of Skinhead Authenticity. Journal of Popular Culture 46 (3):626-646.score: 3.0
    In this paper I examine the history and style of the real-life skinhead subculture in order to clarify its nature and to highlight its preoccupation with the ideal of "authenticity." I then use the insights thus gained in order to understand why it is that the skinhead characters in such fictional films as Romper Stomper, American History X and The Believer are, despite their neo-Nazism, granted a sympathetic depiction.
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  21. John C. Rethorst (1991). Myth and Morality. Journal of Moral Education 20 (3):329-337.score: 3.0
    Abstract This paper discusses possibilities of ethical perception, and draws a strong contrast between traditional rationally?based views, and more recent theories involving both narrative and feminist ethical points of view. I argue that these two latter categories share more conceptually than is usually acknowledged, add to this the possibility that some theories of aesthetic perception bear similarity to points of the non?rational moral theories, and discuss whether this similarity is organic or incidental. The finding of structural similarity lends support to (...)
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  22. Alan Sokal, Postmodernism and the Left.score: 3.0
    ALAN SOKAL'S HOAX, "Transgressing the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity," which was published in the "Science Wars" issue of Social Text ,1 and the debate that has followed it, raise important issues for the left. Sokal's article is a parody of postmodernism, or, more precisely, the amalgam of postmodernism, poststructuralist theory, deconstruction, and political moralism which has come to hold sway in large areas of academia, especially those associated with Cultural Studies. These intellectual strands are not always (...)
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  23. Lee C. Rice (2000). Homosexualization and Collectivism. Philosophy and Theology 12 (2):275-292.score: 3.0
    I examine the new analysis of gay community and liberation offered by Dennis Altman in The Homosexualization of America. Three distinctive theoretical constructs are analyzed and criticized: (1) a new view of psychosocial development; (2) a new concept of gay identity; and (3) A set of causal hypotheses designed to explain the new direction of the gay subculture.
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  24. G. Banaszak (1996). Musical Culture as a Configuration of Subcultures. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 47:517-530.score: 3.0
     
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  25. Martin Calkins (2002). Silicon Valley's Next Generation of Entrepreneurs. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2002:209-218.score: 3.0
    This article focuses on the next generation of entrepreneurs likely to emerge in Silicon Valley. It profiles two tech-savvy college students and describes the Valley’s demographics and subculture to show how previous models of the entrepreneur (the pre-Internet and geek subculture varieties) are blending to form a new sort of entrepreneur for a computer industry in transition.
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  26. Joseph D. Calabrese (2001). The Supreme Court Versus Peyote: Consciousness Alteration, Cultural Psychiatry and the Dilemma of Contemporary Subcultures. Anthropology of Consciousness 12 (2):4-18.score: 3.0
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  27. Diana Cotrau (2010). Linguistic Encoding of Youth Ideology by the Romanian Teen Magazines for Girls. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (6):29-48.score: 3.0
    This paper aims to establish and identify the linguistic devices through which the niche printed media specifically targeting a young female local audience identify, shape and construct their ad- dressee by acknowledging their subcultural ideology. Our intention is to trace the measure of congruency between the two types of discourse: of the encoder and of the decoder. Such instantiations as were found at the level of text functions, discourse patterns and strategies, rhetorical and linguistic items testify to our conclusion that (...)
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  28. R. Lakes (1999). Mosh Pit Politics: The Subcultural Style of Punk Rage. Journal of Thought 34:21-32.score: 3.0
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  29. Tyson Lewis & Richard Kahn (2009). Exopedagogies and the Utopian Imagination: A Case Study in Faery Subcultures. Theory and Event 12 (2).score: 3.0
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  30. Steve Mizrach (1997). Iterative Discourse and the Formation of New Subcultures. Anthropology of Consciousness 8 (4):133-143.score: 3.0
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  31. D. Newlyn (1934). A Subcultural Family. The Eugenics Review 25 (4):237.score: 3.0
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  32. Paul Oldham (2012). Lobby Loyde: The G.O.D. Father of Australian Rock. Thesis Eleven 109 (1):44-63.score: 3.0
    This article contends that the influence of Australian rock musician Lobby Loyde has been overlooked by Australia’s popular music scholarship. The research examines Loyde’s significance and influence through the neglected sphere of his work (1966–1980) with The Coloured Balls, The Purple Hearts, The Wild Cherries, The Aztecs, Southern Electric, Sudden Electric and Rose Tattoo, and his role as producer in the late-1970s until his death. First, it explores how he has been discussed by his musical peers and respected Australian rock (...)
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  33. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 3.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  34. Doreen Piano (forthcoming). Analyzing a Zine: Studying Subcultural Production on the World Wide Web. Kairos: A Journal for Teachers of Writing and Webbed Environments.score: 3.0
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  35. Birgit Richard & Jan Grünwald (2011). Pimp My Black! Black Death Jewellery in Youth Subcultures. In Wilhelm Lindemann & Joan Clough (eds.), Thinkingjewellery: On the Way Towards a Theory of Jewellery = Schmuckdenken: Unterwegs Zu Einer Theorie des Schmucks. Acc Distribution [Distributor].score: 3.0
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  36. Alan Sinfield (1994). Sexuality and Subcultures in the Wake of Welfare Capitalism. Radical Philosophy 66:40-43.score: 3.0
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  37. R. S. Slack (1998). Subcultural Mosaics and Intersubjective Realities (R. Prus). Educational Philosophy and Theory 30:321-324.score: 3.0
     
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  38. John Zerzan (2007). Second-Best Life: Real Virtuality. Telos 2007 (141):187-190.score: 3.0
    Reams of empirical studies and a century or two of social theory have noticed that modernity produces increasingly shallow and instrumental relationships. Where bonds of mutuality, based on face-to-face connection, once survived, we now tend to exist in a depthless, dematerialized technoculture. This is the trajectory of industrial mass society: not transcending itself through technology, but instead becoming ever more fully realized. In this context, it is striking to note that the original usage of “virtual” was as the adjectival form (...)
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  39. Ziad Swaidan, Scott J. Vitell & Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas (2003). Consumer Ethics: Determinants of Ethical Beliefs of African Americans. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (2):175 - 186.score: 2.0
    This study explores the ethical ideol-ogies and ethical beliefs of African American consumers using the Forsyth ethical position questionnaire (EPQ) and the Muncy-Vitell consumer ethics questionnaire (MVQ). The two dimensions of the EPQ (i.e., idealism and relativism) were the independent constructs and the four dimensions of the MVQ (i.e., illegal, active, passive and no harm) were the dependent variables. In addition, this paper explores the consumer ethics of African Americans across four demographic factors (i.e., age, education, gender, and marital status). (...)
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  40. Angela Cooke-Jackson & Elizabeth K. Hansen (2008). Appalachian Culture and Reality TV: The Ethical Dilemma of Stereotyping Others. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (3):183 – 200.score: 1.0
    Stereotypical images of Appalachians abound in entertainment media. When CBS proposed transplanting a poor Appalachian family to California for a reality television show titled The Real Beverly Hillbillies, Appalachians and advocacy groups were outraged. This article explores ethical issues raised by stereotypical portrayals of Appalachians and potential harm from those stereotypes as well as the reality from which they emerged. Using the theories of Levinas, Kant, and Aristotle, we then examine the ethics of stereotyping Appalachians and other subcultures in entertainment (...)
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  41. Amanda Sinclair (1993). Approaches to Organisational Culture and Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (1):63 - 73.score: 1.0
    This paper assesses the potential of organisational culture as a means for improving ethics in organisations. Organisational culture is recognised as one determinant of how people behave, more or less ethically, in organisations. It is also incresingly understood as an attribute that management can and should influence to improve organisational performance. When things go wrong in organisations, managers look to the culture as both the source of problems and the basis for solutions. Two models of organisational culture and ethical behaviour (...)
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  42. Noretta Koertge (2000). Science, Values, and the Value of Science. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):57.score: 1.0
    Protagonists in the so-called Science Wars differ most markedly in their views about the role of values in science and what makes science valuable. Scientists and philosophers of science have traditionally considered the principal aims of science to be explanation and application. Only cognitive values should influence what is taken to be explanatory. Social and political values affect the priority assigned to various scientific problems and the ways in which scientific results are applied. Ethical considerations may be brought to bear (...)
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  43. Bradford Verter (2003). Spiritual Capital: Theorizing Religion with Bourdieu Against Bourdieu. Sociological Theory 21 (2):150-174.score: 1.0
    Bourdieu's theory of culture offers a rich conceptual resource for the social-scientific study of religion. In particular, his analysis of cultural capital as a medium of social relations suggests an economic model of religion alternative to that championed by rational choice theorists. After evaluating Bourdieu's limited writings on religion, this paper draws upon his wider work to craft a new model of "spiritual capital." Distinct from Iannaccone's and Stark and Finke's visions of "religious capital," this Bourdieuian model treats religious knowledge, (...)
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  44. Martin Lewison (1999). Conflicts of Interest? The Ethics of Usury. Journal of Business Ethics 22 (4):327 - 339.score: 1.0
    Social attitudes toward usury (here defined using the archaic meaning as the taking of interest on loans) have changed dramatically over the centuries. From antiquity until the Protestant Reformation, usury was regarded as an inherently evil activity. Today, with few exceptions, usury is met with moral indifference. Modern objections to usury are limited to protest against "excessive" interest rates rather than interest per se. With this change in focus, the very meaning of the term "usury" has also changed. Many early (...)
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  45. Bryan Rill (2010). Identity Discourses on the Dancefloor. Anthropology of Consciousness 21 (2):139-162.score: 1.0
    Electronic Dance Music Culture (EDMC) is one of the largest subcultural musical movements in history. The dance floor is a creative context that engenders a freedom among participants to reshape their social identity within the Temporary Autonomous Zones (TAZ) that raves, the central spaces for EDMC, provide. On the dance floor, participants enter into powerful trances that have the capacity to reshape notions of self and personhood. This paper examines such identity discourses and suggests that trance consciousness re-constitutes the bodily (...)
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  46. Tom Clark, Culture and Objectivity.score: 1.0
    The ongoing debate over multiculturalism involves, among other issues, what might be called the quest for cultural validation: the desire of racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual minorities to be seen as legitimate in their own right. Black, feminist, and gay subcultures, among others, wish to assert their particular differences from prevailing social norms and want to be accepted by the larger culture they are challenging. Legitimacy will be achieved when society incorporates the subcultural differences as normal social variation and when (...)
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  47. San-Jin Han (2001). Modernization and the Rise of Civil Society: The Role of the “Middling Grassroots” for Democratization in Korea. [REVIEW] Human Studies 24 (1-2):113-132.score: 1.0
    This paper attempts to explain why and how the middle class in Korea decisively joined the democratic movement in 1987 by drawing special attention to the role played by the middling grassroots (MG). MG was formed out of the common experience of student activism and contesting subcultures, which were widely dispersed over Korean university campuses during the 1980s. In addition, this paper examines the contrasting views on the Korean democratic transition by Bruce Cumings and Adam Przeworski. This substantive analysis attempts (...)
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  48. Joseph Heath (1998). Culture: Choice or Circumstance? Constellations 5 (2):183-200.score: 1.0
    In this paper, I would like to discuss two recent attempts to incorporate groupdifferentiated rights and entitlements into a broadly liberal conception of distributive justice. The first is John Roemer’s “pragmatic theory of responsibility,” and the second is Will Kymlicka’s defense of minority rights in “multinational” states.1 Both arguments try to show that egalitarianism, far from requiring a “color-blind” system of institutions and laws that is insensitive to ethnic, linguistic or subcultural differences, may in fact mandate special types of rights, (...)
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  49. Paul Thagard, Being Interdisciplinary: Trading Zones in Cognitive Science.score: 1.0
    By the early part of the twentieth century, academia in the English-speaking world had stabilized (or ossified!) into a set of scientific and humanistic disciplines that still survives at the century’s end. The natural sciences have such disciplines as physics, chemistry, and biology, and the social sciences include economics, psychology, and sociology. These disciplines provide a convenient organizing principle for university departments and professional organizations, but they often bear little relation to cuttingedge research, which can concern topics that cut across (...)
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  50. Peg Tittle (1996). Sexual Activity, Consent, Mistaken Belief, and Mens Rea. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 3 (1):19-22.score: 1.0
    The gendered subcultures of our society may have different value systems. Consequently, sexual activity that involves members of these subcultures may be problematic, especially concerning the encoding and decoding of consent. This has serious consequences for labelling the activity as sex or sexual assault. Conceiving consent not as a mental act but as a behavioural act (that is, using a performative standard) would eliminate these problems. However, if we remove the mental element from one aspect, then to be consistent we (...)
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