Search results for 'Subculture' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Nikola Bozilovic (2006). Identity and the Meaning of Style in Subculture. Filozofija I Društvo 30:233-250.
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  2.  2
    Ji soo Ha & Judy Park (2010). Significance of Changing Korean Youth Subculture Styles. Asian Culture and History 3 (1):p23.
    Subcultures are cultures formed by a social minority group that does not belong to the mainstream, and youth subcultures are subcultures specifically of youths. Youth subcultures have distinct clothing styles that differentiate them from popular culture and through which they express their values and individuality. Korea has a short history of subcultures, but it has quickly formed numerous unique subcultures influenced both by existing subcultures of Euro-America and Korean society. The purpose of this research was to examine Korean youth (...) styles in terms of how they have evolved in a short period of time and how they have been affected by foreign and domestic elements. It provides insight on the symbolization of Korean youth subculture styles and how the changing styles reflect the state of mind and values of Korean youths today. (shrink)
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  3.  7
    Victoria Pitts (1999). Body Modification, Self-Mutilation and Agency in Media Accounts of a Subculture. Body and Society 5 (2-3):291-303.
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  4.  3
    Tim Cloudsley (2007). After Subculture. The European Legacy 12 (3):361-364.
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  5.  6
    Susan Willis (1993). Hardcore: Subculture American Style. Critical Inquiry 19 (2):365-383.
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  6.  7
    Helga Botermann (1980). Polish Miners in the Ruhr Area, 1870–1945. Social Integration of a Minority in German Industrial Society and Development of a National Subculture. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 13 (2):219-221.
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  7.  3
    Marco Santoro (2000). Mafia, Cultura E Subculture. Polis 14 (1):91-112.
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  8. Victoria Bush, Alan J. Bush, Jared Oakley & John E. Cicala (forthcoming). The Sales Profession as a Subculture: Implications for Ethical Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  9. Dick Hebdige (2005). Subculture. Routledge.
    First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  10.  12
    BaoChun Zhao & ShanShan Xu (2013). Does Consumer Unethical Behavior Relate to Birthplace? Evidence From China. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):475-488.
    This study explores the relationship between individual birthplace [rural birthplace (RB) and urban birthplace (UB)] and consumer unethical behavior (CUB). As a result, CUB is verified to closely relate to individual birthplace, and those new urban residents with RB are found to behave more ethically than the patrimonial urban residents with UB in CUB4 (“no harm/no foul”). This study also finds that the differentiation of CUB between two categories of consumers is correlated with the personal moral ideology or Machiavellianism (MA) (...)
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  11.  10
    Ziad Swaidan (2012). Culture and Consumer Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):201-213.
    Disparity in consumer ethics reflects cultural variations; these are differences in the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes one culture from another. This study explores the differences in consumer ethics across cultural dimensions using Hofstede's (in Culture's consequences: international differences in work-related values, Sage, Beverly Hills, 1980) model (collectivism, masculinity, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance) and Muncy and Vitell (in J Bus Res 24(4): 297-311, 1992) consumer ethics model (i.e., illegal, active, passive, and no harm). This is the first (...)
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  12.  6
    Paul Cooke & Helen Vassallo (eds.) (2009). Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts. Peter Lang.
    The essays in this collection, which derive from the conference 'Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts', held at the University of Exeter in September 2007, explore various aspects of this ...
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  13.  34
    Jack Coulehan (2011). "A Gentle and Humane Temper" Humility in Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):206-216.
    In his story entitled "Toenails," the surgeon Richard Selzer (1982) warns readers that total immersion in medicine is wrongheaded. Rather, to ensure their own health, doctors should discover other passions that permit them periodically to disconnect from medical practice. Selzer's surgeon character devotes his Wednesday afternoons to the public library, where he joins "a subculture of elderly men and women who gather … to read or sleep beneath the world's newspapers" (p. 69). Among these often eccentric personages is Neckerchief, (...)
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  14. Bob Plant (2007). Playing Games/Playing Us: Foucault on Sadomasochism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (5):531-561.
    The impact of Foucault's work can still be felt across a range of academic disciplines. It is nevertheless important to remember that, for him, theoretical activity was intimately related to the concrete practices of self-transformation; as he acknowledged: `I write in order to change myself.' 1 This avowal is especially pertinent when considering Foucault's work on the relationship between sex and power. For Foucault not only theorized about this topic; he was also actively involved in the S&M subculture of (...)
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  15.  17
    Ian Hunter, Heideggerian Mathematics: Badiou's Being and Event.
    The combination of Heideggerian metaphysics and advanced mathematics in Alain Badiou’s Being and Event presents a unique challenge to modern commentary. Badiou’s metaphysical axe-grinding makes his work uninteresting to mathematical logicians, while the humanities scholars who wield his axes often have little grasp of the mathematics on which they are supposed to have been honed. This lacuna helps to explain why Being and Event has been dismissed by some as ‘fashionable nonsense’ and praised by others as “one of the most (...)
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  16.  33
    Thomas Hofweber (2010). Inferential Role and the Ideal of Deductive Logic. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 5 (1).
    There is a substantial question in the philosophy of language whether understanding a language involves knowledge of some metalinguistic facts about words. Does understanding a language in part consist in knowing what the words in that language mean? Most of the debate about this topic is carried out in the philosophy of language proper, where it seems to belong.1 But recently a subculture of philosophers has emerged who have argued that one of the lessons we must draw from issues (...)
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  17.  12
    Paul Oldham (2012). Lobby Loyde: The G.O.D. Father of Australian Rock. Thesis Eleven 109 (1):44-63.
    This article contends that the influence of Australian rock musician Lobby Loyde has been overlooked by Australia’s popular music scholarship. The research examines Loyde’s significance and influence through the neglected sphere of his work (1966–1980) with The Coloured Balls, The Purple Hearts, The Wild Cherries, The Aztecs, Southern Electric, Sudden Electric and Rose Tattoo, and his role as producer in the late-1970s until his death. First, it explores how he has been discussed by his musical peers and respected Australian rock (...)
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  18.  9
    Alvin Cheng-Hin Lim (2014). Hybridity as Heterochrony. World Futures 70 (8):486-495.
    In his essay “Of Other Spaces” Michel Foucault explained that heterotopias, or spaces of otherness, “function at full capacity when men arrive at a sort of absolute break with their traditional time.” This temporal otherness he described as “heterochrony.” In this article I will draw on the Sartrean ontology of the human being as temporal ecstasis to explain the transcultural phenomenon of hybridity as heterochrony, and in particular, how hybrid temporality is out of sync with local temporality. Heeding Virinder Kalra, (...)
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  19.  15
    Martin Calkins (2002). Silicon Valley's Next Generation of Entrepreneurs. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2002:209-218.
    This article focuses on the next generation of entrepreneurs likely to emerge in Silicon Valley. It profiles two tech-savvy college students and describes the Valley’s demographics and subculture to show how previous models of the entrepreneur (the pre-Internet and geek subculture varieties) are blending to form a new sort of entrepreneur for a computer industry in transition.
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  20.  24
    Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  21.  2
    Esther Newton (1979). Mother Camp: Female Impersonators in America. University of Chicago Press.
    Interviews with female impersonators reveal the social, cultural, and economic aspects of their occupation and the subculture of the homosexual transvestite.
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  22.  15
    Erik Sengers (2006). “Because We Are Catholic, We Are Modern” the Adaptation of Dutch Catholicism to Modern Dutch Society 1920–1960. Bijdragen 67 (1):23-41.
    The general picture of the history of Dutch Catholicism is that of a unified, hierarchic, ultra-montane subculture between 1870-1960 that was replaced for a liberal, open-minded, world-oriented identity after Vatican II. But in daily life, contrary to the official declarations, the Church and its members gradually adapted to modern society already after 1920. With the help of rational choice theory on religion, this shift from ‘sect’ to ‘church’ in this period will be highlighted. Catholics became ordinary citizens, changed their (...)
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  23.  17
    Kathleen C. Gerbasi, Laura L. Scaletta, C. Nuka Plante & Penny L. Bernstein (2011). Why so FURious? Rebuttal of Dr. Fiona Probyn-Rapsey's Response to Gerbasi Et Al.'S Furries From A to Z (Anthropomorphism to Zoomorphism)”. Society and Animals 19 (3):302-304.
    This is a rebuttal to Fiona Probyn-Rapsey’s criticisms of the original furry research conducted in 2006 and published in 2008. Her focus on gender identity disorder misses the main point of the study, which was that it was the first empirical study to collect data scientifically and report findings on the furry fandom, an often misrepresented subculture.
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  24. Carolus Linnaeus (2002). Nemesis Divina. Upa.
    Eric Miller's affordable, elegant translation of Nemesis divina by Carolus Linnaeus reveals a little-known side of the great natural historian. A classic of Swedish literature that influenced luminaries such as August Strindberg, Nemesis divina was composed over years, apparently for the edification of Linnaeus's wayward son Carl. A surprising field-guide to theodicy, the book explores the occult operation of a Theologia experimentalis, an "empirical theology," in the lives of men and women. Many of these people were known to Linnaeus himself. (...)
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  25.  36
    John Manzo (2010). Coffee, Connoisseurship, and an Ethnomethodologically-Informed Sociology of Taste. Human Studies 33 (2):141-155.
    Coffee is an important commodity and an important comestible, one that is momentous not only for nations’ economies but also, at the micro-social level, as a resource for interpersonal sociability. Among a subculture of certain coffee connoisseurs, the coffee itself is a topic that is an organizing focus of, and for, that sociability. This paper is an empirical investigation of online narratives produced by hobbyist participants in what coffee aficionados refer to as the third wave coffee phenomenon and engages (...)
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  26.  6
    Richard Mullen & Grant Gillett (2014). Delusions: A Different Kind of Belief? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (1):27-37.
    Delusions, a key feature of psychosis, are usually thought of as a type of belief, as in the definition of the American Psychiatric Association: A false belief based on incorrect inference about external reality that is firmly sustained despite what almost everyone else believes and despite what constitutes incontrovertible and obvious proof or evidence to the contrary. The belief is not one ordinarily accepted by other members of the person’s culture or subculture (e.g. it is not an article of (...)
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  27.  6
    Kathleen C. Gerbasi, Penny L. Bernstein, Laura L. Scaletta & C. Nuka Plante (2011). Why so FURious? Rebuttal of Dr. Fiona Probyn-Rapsey’s Response to Gerbasi Et Al.'s Furries From A to Z ”. Society and Animals 19 (3):302-304.
    This is a rebuttal to Fiona Probyn-Rapsey’s criticisms of the original furry research conducted in 2006 and published in 2008. Her focus on gender identity disorder misses the main point of the study, which was that it was the first empirical study to collect data scientifically and report findings on the furry fandom, an often misrepresented subculture.
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  28.  14
    Lee C. Rice (2000). Homosexualization and Collectivism. Philosophy and Theology 12 (2):275-292.
    I examine the new analysis of gay community and liberation offered by Dennis Altman in The Homosexualization of America. Three distinctive theoretical constructs are analyzed and criticized: (1) a new view of psychosocial development; (2) a new concept of gay identity; and (3) A set of causal hypotheses designed to explain the new direction of the gay subculture.
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  29.  5
    Geoffrey Skoll (2013). The Art of Living Together. Cultura 10 (2):49-70.
    A neighborhood in a US city seems to present a possibly unique exception to empirical generalizations and explanations of urban decline and occasional rehabilitation. Resisting decline, gentrification, and outside interests and actors, the neighborhood generated a subculture created by working class artists. As a valuable occasion for revising urban social theory, this essay draws on the work of Howard S. Becker, Pierre Bourdieu, Henri Lefebvre, Jacques Rancière, and Georg Simmel, among others. It relies on ethnographic method for its empirical (...)
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  30.  6
    John Marmysz (2013). The Lure of the Mob: Contemporary Cinematic Depictions of Skinhead Authenticity. Journal of Popular Culture 46 (3):626-646.
    In this paper I examine the history and style of the real-life skinhead subculture in order to clarify its nature and to highlight its preoccupation with the ideal of "authenticity." I then use the insights thus gained in order to understand why it is that the skinhead characters in such fictional films as Romper Stomper, American History X and The Believer are, despite their neo-Nazism, granted a sympathetic depiction.
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  31.  5
    John Hagan (2004). Twin Towers, Iron Cages and the Culture of Control. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (2):42-48.
    David Garland?s The Culture of Control tells us more about the political culture of a post?11 September world than even he must have anticipated. The core of Garland?s cultural argument is his elaboration of a Durkheimian concept of moral individualism, to which he attributes a trend?setting influence lasting into the new millennium. He argues that, among youth, this new cultural influence has an egoistic, hedonistic quality, linked to a non?stop consumption ethos of the new capitalism. He emphasises that it is (...)
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  32.  3
    John C. Rethorst (1991). Myth and Morality. Journal of Moral Education 20 (3):329-337.
    Abstract This paper discusses possibilities of ethical perception, and draws a strong contrast between traditional rationally?based views, and more recent theories involving both narrative and feminist ethical points of view. I argue that these two latter categories share more conceptually than is usually acknowledged, add to this the possibility that some theories of aesthetic perception bear similarity to points of the non?rational moral theories, and discuss whether this similarity is organic or incidental. The finding of structural similarity lends support to (...)
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  33.  1
    John Zerzan (2007). Second-Best Life: Real Virtuality. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2007 (141):187-190.
    Reams of empirical studies and a century or two of social theory have noticed that modernity produces increasingly shallow and instrumental relationships. Where bonds of mutuality, based on face-to-face connection, once survived, we now tend to exist in a depthless, dematerialized technoculture. This is the trajectory of industrial mass society: not transcending itself through technology, but instead becoming ever more fully realized. In this context, it is striking to note that the original usage of “virtual” was as the adjectival form (...)
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  34. Alan Sokal, Postmodernism and the Left.
    ALAN SOKAL'S HOAX, "Transgressing the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity," which was published in the "Science Wars" issue of Social Text ,1 and the debate that has followed it, raise important issues for the left. Sokal's article is a parody of postmodernism, or, more precisely, the amalgam of postmodernism, poststructuralist theory, deconstruction, and political moralism which has come to hold sway in large areas of academia, especially those associated with Cultural Studies. These intellectual strands are not always (...)
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  35.  1
    Bart Pattyn (2002). Introduction. Ethical Perspectives 9 (1):1-2.
    While ethicists reflect on specific political and biomedical problems such as euthanasia, the international political context is becoming grim. A number of the articles in this issue, such as the one by Vasti Roodt, make implicit reference to this. It is quite naïve to think that ethicists can exert any influence on the prevailing interpretations of political conflicts, but at the same time it would be inappropriate to take that fact as a reason for no longer being concerned. No one (...)
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  36. Richard Barbrook (2002). Napster partout ! Multitudes 1 (1):200-210.
    In reviewing John Aldermann’s recent The Sonic Boom, Richard Barbrook, traces a passage in the history of the Net where a young subculture, supported by Napster, has proved itself far more powerful than all the supposedly well established ’business models’ of the music industry. These quietly transgressive practices ended up damaging well defended copyrights in the musical domain. As a result of what Barbrook calls mutual, egalitarian, and open computing, principally the principal of P2P exchange, this new generation has (...)
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  37. Herman Brutsaert * (2004). Gender Organization of Schooling and Television Viewing Among Early Adolescents: A Test of Two Alternative Hypotheses. Educational Studies 30 (4):471-483.
    In this analysis, single‐sex and mixed schools are compared in terms of pupils' television viewing habits, the latter factor being considered as an indicator of a pupil's sense of educational responsibilities. It was hypothesized that the presumably lower levels of television watching among girls attending single‐sex schools could be explained by school climate factors pertaining to adolescent subculture values and/or to the pedagogic approaches of a predominantly female staff. Use was made of data from 68 academic‐type secondary schools in (...)
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  38. Eric Miller (ed.) (2002). Nemesis Divina. Upa.
    Eric Miller's affordable, elegant translation of Nemesis divina by Carolus Linnaeus reveals a little-known side of the great natural historian. A classic of Swedish literature that influenced luminaries such as August Strindberg, Nemesis divina was composed over years, apparently for the edification of Linnaeus's wayward son Carl. A surprising field-guide to theodicy, the book explores the occult operation of a Theologia experimentalis, an "empirical theology," in the lives of men and women. Many of these people were known to Linnaeus himself. (...)
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  39. David Simpson (1988). Literary Criticism and the Return to "History". Critical Inquiry 14 (4):721-747.
    If any emergent historical criticism will tend by its own choice toward inclusiveness and eclecticism, it is also likely to be constrained by more subtle forms of complicity with the theoretical subculture within which it seeks its audience. It is not in principle impossible that we might choose to set going an initiative that is very different indeed from the methods and approaches already in place. But is nonetheless clear that we must be aware, in some propaedeutic way, of (...)
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  40. Kevin Wehr (2009). Hermes on Two Wheels: The Sociology of Bicycle Messengers. Upa.
    Hermes on Two Wheels shows the dynamic world of the bicycle messenger through a sociological lens, based on a five-year participant observation study. Beginning with the experiences of messengers themselves and moving to describe the structural settings of those experiences, the research shows how messengers work within a political-economic system that devalues semi-skilled labor and strips people of emotional fulfillment. The voluntary risk-taking of messengers becomes a means of achieving such emotional fulfillment as well as making a living, while their (...)
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