Search results for 'Subject' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Neil W. Williams (2012). Against Atomic Individualism in Plural Subject Theory. Phenomenology and Mind 3:65-81.
    Within much contemporary social ontology there is a particular methodology at work. This methodology takes as a starting point two or more asocial or atomic individuals. These individuals are taken to be perfectly functional agents, though outside of all social relations. Following this, combinations of these individuals are considered, to deduce what constitutes a social group. Here I will argue that theories which rely on this methodology are always circular, so long as they purport to describe the formation of all (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  74
    Brian Kim (forthcoming). In Defense of Subject-Sensitive Invariantism. Episteme:1-19.
    Keith DeRose has argued that the two main problems facing subject-sensitive invariantism (SSI) come from the appropriateness of certain third-person denials of knowledge and the inappropriateness of now you know it, now you don't claims. I argue that proponents of SSI can adequately address both problems. First, I argue that the debate between contextualism and SSI has failed to account for an important pragmatic feature of third-person denials of knowledge. Appealing to these pragmatic features, I show that straightforward third-person (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  67
    Gary Hatfield (2011). Transparency of Mind: The Contributions of Descartes, Leibniz, and Berkeley to the Genesis of the Modern Subject. In Hubertus Busche (ed.), Departure for Modern Europe: A Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy (1400-1700). Felix Meiner Verlag 361–375.
    The chapter focuses on attributions of the transparency of thought to early modern figures, most notably Descartes. Many recent philosophers assume that Descartes believed the mind to be “transparent”: since all mental states are conscious, we are therefore aware of them all, and indeed incorrigibly know them all. Descartes, and Berkeley too, do make statements that seem to endorse both aspects of the transparency theses (awareness of all mental states; incorrigibility). However, they also make systematic theoretical statements that directly countenance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  1
    Emile Bojesen (2016). Inventing the Educational Subject in the ‘Information Age’. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (3):267-278.
    This paper asks the question of how we can situate the educational subject in what Luciano Floridi has defined as an ‘informational ontology’. It will suggest that Jacques Derrida and Bernard Stiegler offer paths toward rethinking the educational subject that lend themselves to an informational future, as well as speculating on how, with this knowledge, we can educate to best equip ourselves and others for our increasingly digital world. Jacques Derrida thought the concept of the subject was (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. A. W. McHoul (1993/1998). A Foucault Primer: Discourse, Power, and the Subject. University of Otago Press.
    "A consistently clear, comprehensive and accessible introduction which carefully sifts Foucault's work for both its strengths and weaknesses. McHoul and Grace show an intimate familiarity with Foucault's writings and a lively, but critical engagement with the relevance of his work. A model primer." -Tony Bennett, author of Outside Literature In such seminal works as Madness and Civilization, Discipline and Punish , and The History of Sexuality , the late philosopher Michel Foucault explored what our politics, our sexuality, our societal conventions, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  6.  21
    Käthe Schneider (2012). The Subject-Object Transformations and 'Bildung'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (3):302-311.
    Bildung, a German pedagogical term with the sense of ‘educating oneself’, refers to some of the most complex human activities. It is constitutive for human existence, because it is related to the characteristic of meaning. Because of the great relevance of Bildung for people, education is essential for furthering it. The two purposes of this contribution are: i. to examine the structure of one main process component of Bildung, namely the process of designing an image (Bild) of the changes to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  7.  5
    Peter Baumann (forthcoming). Knowledge Across Contexts. A Problem for Subject-Sensitive Invariantism. Dialogue.
    The possibility of knowledge attributions across contexts (where attributor and subject find themselves in different epistemic contexts) can create serious problems for certain views of knowledge. Amongst such views is subject—sensitive invariantism—the view that knowledge is determined not only by epistemic factors (belief, truth, evidence, etc.) but also by non—epistemic factors (practical interests, etc.). I argue that subject—sensitive invariantism either runs into a contradiction or has to make very implausible assumptions. The problem has been very much neglected (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Galen Strawson (2003). What is the Relation Between an Experience, the Subject of the Experience, and the Content of the Experience? Philosophical Issues 13 (1):279-315.
    This version of this paper has been superseded by a substantially revised version in G. Strawson, Real Materialism and Other Essays (OUP 2008) I take 'content' in a natural internalist way to refer to occurrent mental content. I introduce a 'thin' or ‘live’ notion of the subject according to which a subject of experience cannot exist unless there is an experience for it to be the subject of. I then argue, first, that in the case of a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  9. Eduardo Cadava, Peter Connor & Jean-Luc Nancy (eds.) (1991). Who Comes After the Subject? Routledge.
  10.  21
    Steve Pile & N. J. Thrift (eds.) (1995). Mapping the Subject: Geographies of Cultural Transformation. Routledge.
    With no precise boundaries, always on the move and too complex to be defined by space and time, is it possible to map the human subject? This book attempts to do just this, exploring the places of the subject in contemporary culture. The editors approach this subject from four main aspects--its construction, sexuality, limits and politics--using a wide ranging review of literature on subjectivity across the social and human sciences. The first part of the book establishes the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  11.  35
    Jukka Törrönen (2014). Situational, Cultural and Societal Identities: Analysing Subject Positions as Classifications, Participant Roles, Viewpoints and Interactive Positions. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):80-98.
    In this article I develop tools for analyzing the identities that emerge in qualitative material. I approach identities as historically, socially and culturally produced subject positions, as processes that are in a constant state of becoming and that receive their temporary stability and meaning in concrete contexts and circumstances. I suggest that the identities and subject positions that materialize in qualitative material can be analyzed from four different perspectives. They can be approached by focusing on (1) classifications that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  22
    Sara Heinämaa (2015). Anonymity and Personhood: Merleau-Ponty’s Account of the Subject of Perception. Continental Philosophy Review 48 (2):123-142.
    Several commentators have argued that with his concept of anonymity Merleau-Ponty breaks away from classical Husserlian phenomenology that is methodologically tied to the first person perspective. Many contemporary commentators see Merleau-Ponty’s discourse on anonymity as a break away from Husserl’s framework that is seen as hopelessly subjectivistic and solipsistic. Some judge and reproach it as a disastrous misunderstanding that leads to a confusion of philosophical and empirical concerns. Both parties agree that Merleau-Ponty’s concepts of anonymity mark a divergence from classical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  4
    Konrad Werner (forthcoming). What is It Like to Be the Metaphysical Subject? An Essay on Early Wittgenstein, Our Epistemic Position, and Beyond. Philosophia:1-26.
    I argue that Ludwig Wittgenstein’s idea of the metaphysical subject sheds new light on subjective qualities of experience. In this article I draw first of all on the interpretations provided by Michael Kremer and James Conant. Subsequently, I conclude that “what is it like” means primarily “what is it like to see myself as the metaphysical subject”.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  14
    Jojo Joseph Varakukalayil (2015). Body as Subjectivity to Ethical Signification of the Body: Revisiting Levinas’s Early Conception of the Subject. Sophia 54 (3):281-295.
    In Levinas’s early works, the ‘body as subjectivity’ is the focus of research bearing significant implications for his later philosophy of the body. How this is achieved becomes the thrust of this article. We analyze how the existent, through hypostasis, emerges hic et nunc, and explores further its effort to exist is effected in its relation to existence. In delineating this, we argue that the existent does not emerge from the il y a as an idealistic subject, but rather (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Marc Champagne (2008-09). What Anchors Semiosis: How Descartes Changed the Subject. RS/SI (Recherches Sémiotiques / Semiotic Inquiry) 28 (3-1):183–197.
    The goal of this article is twofold. First, it revises the historiographic partition proposed by John Deely in Four Ages of Understanding (2001) by arguing that the moment marking the beginning of philosophical Modernity has been vividly recorded in Descartes’ Meditations on First Philosophy with the experiment with the wax. Second, an upshot of this historical study is that it helps make sense of Deely’s somewhat iconoclastic use of the words “subject” and “subjectivity” to designate mind-independent worldly things. The (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Daniel Kolak (2008). Room for a View: On the Metaphysical Subject of Personal Identity. Synthese 162 (3):341 - 372.
    Sydney Shoemaker leads today’s “neo-Lockean” liberation of persons from the conservative animalist charge of “neo-Aristotelians” such as Eric Olson, according to whom persons are biological entities and who challenge all neo-Lockean views on grounds that abstracting from strictly physical, or bodily, criteria plays fast and loose with our identities. There is a fundamental mistake on both sides: a false dichotomy between bodily continuity versus psychological continuity theories of personal identity. Neo-Lockeans, like everyone else today who relies on Locke’s analysis of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  4
    Brayton Polka (2015). Modern Philosophy, the Subject, and the God of the Bible. Sophia 54 (4):563-576.
    In my paper, I undertake to show that the God of the Bible is the subject of modern philosophy, i.e., that philosophy is biblical and that the Bible is philosophical. Central to the argument of my paper is an analysis of the fundamental difference between the philosophy of Aristotle, as based on the law of contradiction and thus on the contradictory opposition between necessity and existence, and the philosophy of, in particular, Spinoza and Kant, as based on the transcendental (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  7
    Jonathan Wyn Schofer (2005). Self, Subject, and Chosen Subjection Rabbinic Ethics and Comparative Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):255-291.
    This paper formulates the categories of "ethics," "self," and "subject" for an analysis of classical rabbinic ethics centered on the text, "The Fathers According to Rabbi Nathan." Early rabbis were concerned with the realms of life that today's scholars describe as ethics and self-cultivation, yet they had no overarching concepts for either the self/person or for ethics. This analysis, then, cannot rely only upon native rabbinic terminology, but also requires a careful use of contemporary categories. This paper first sets (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  82
    E. J. Bond (2005). Does the Subject of Experience Exist in the World? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (1):124-133.
    In this paper I attempt to show, by considering a number of sources, including Wittgenstein, Sartre, Thomas Nagel and Spinoza, but also adding something crucial of my own, that it is impossible to construe the subject of experience as an object among other objects in the world. My own added argument is the following. The subject of experience cannot move in time along with material events and processes or it could not be aware of the passage of time, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  5
    José Miguel Gambra (2015). To Be in a Subject and Accident. Vivarium 53 (2-4):170-193.
    _ Source: _Volume 53, Issue 2-4, pp 170 - 193 Boethius identifies beings that _are in_ a subject with what the Scholastics called predicamental accident, and predication by accident with the predication of what _is in_ a subject. The first of these questionable assimilations went on to become terminology commonly accepted by Scholastics of all eras. On the other hand, the second, which seems quite consistent with the thinking of Aristotle, was only admitted with many reservations, probably because (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  32
    Masashi Kasaki (2014). Subject-Sensitive Invariantism and Isolated Secondhand Knowledge. Acta Analytica 29 (1):83-98.
    Jennifer Lackey challenges the sufficiency version of the knowledge-action principle, viz., that knowledge that p is sufficient to rationally act on p, by proposing a set of alleged counterexamples. Her aim is not only to attack the knowledge-action principle, but also to undermine an argument for subject-sensitive invariantism. Lackey holds that her examples are counterexamples to the sufficiency version of the knowledge-action principle because (a) S knows the proposition in question, but (b) it is not rational for S to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  91
    Boudewijn de Bruin (2009). We and the Plural Subject. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (2):235-259.
    Margaret Gilbert's plural subject theory defines social collectives in terms of common knowledge of expressed willingness to participate in some joint action. The author critically examines Gilbert's application of this theory to linguistic phenomena involving "we," arguing that recent work in linguistics provides the tools to develop a superior account. The author indicates that, apart from its own relevance, one should care about this critique because Gilbert's claims about the first person plural pronoun play a role in the argument (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  14
    Nikolaj Plotnikov (2009). Sergej N. Trubetskoj and the Concept of "Subject" in the History of Russian Thought. Studies in East European Thought 61 (2/3):197 - 208.
    The basic tendencies in the conceptual history of the 'subject' within Russian intellectual history are presented. This backgrounds a closer analysis of S. Trubetskoj's concept of 'conciliar consciousness', including the problems and aporiae connected with it. It will be shown that and how this conception depends on assumptions from prekantian metaphysics and therefore ignores the Kantian account of subjectivity.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  72
    Mait Edey (2002). Subject and Object. In Journal of Consciousness Studies. Thorverton Uk: Imprint Academic 5-6.
    Many definitions and theories of self assume that ‘self’ refers to some thing or process that exists as part of the universe. Similarly, ‘consciousness’ is assumed to refer to a property of such a part. These basic assumptions are mistaken, and generate some of the deepest confusions in the philosophy of mind. Such distinctions as seer/seen, hearer/heard, and thinker/thought generalize to subject/object. The distinction between subject and object is prior to any theories about the nature of the self: (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  21
    Predrag Krstic (2006). The Enlightenment Odyssey and Oedipus: Subject, Reason and Emancipation in Horkheimer’s and Adorno’s Dialectic of the Enlightenment. Filozofija I Društvo 30:31-58.
    Led by Adorno and Horkheimer’s understanding of the three conceptual orienteers - subject, reason and emancipation - this work attempts to sketch a status that they have attributed to the Enlightenment. Ulysses and Oedipus are here used not only in the way those two authors have done, not only to illustrate dialectical contradictions that this "project" falls into and is marked by, but also in a way that signalize possibilities of different interpretations that have relied upon them. Adorno and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  1
    Jonathan Wyn Schofer (2005). Self, Subject, and Chosen Subjection Rabbinic Ethics and Comparative Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):255-291.
    This paper formulates the categories of "ethics," "self," and "subject" for an analysis of classical rabbinic ethics centered on the text, "The Fathers According to Rabbi Nathan." Early rabbis were concerned with the realms of life that today's scholars describe as ethics and self-cultivation, yet they had no overarching concepts for either the self/person or for ethics. This analysis, then, cannot rely only upon native rabbinic terminology, but also requires a careful use of contemporary categories. This paper first sets (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Lisa Bortolotti (2010). Can the Subject-of-a-Life Criterion Help Grant Rights to Non-Persons? In Matti Häyry (ed.), Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics. Rodopi
    In this paper I compare different criteria for moral status, and assess Regan's notion of a "subject of a life".
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  43
    Elena Pribytkova (2009). Personality, Person, Subject in Russian Legal Philosophy at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Studies in East European Thought 61 (2/3):209 - 220.
    The problem of the legal person is a central issue in legal philosophy and the theory of law. In this article I examine the semantic meaning of the concept of the person in Russian philosophy at the turn of the twentieth century, considered to be the "Golden Age" of Russian legal thought. This provides an overview of the conception of the personality in the context of different legal approaches (theory of natural law, legal positivism, the psychological legal doctrine, and the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  37
    Ingmar Persson (1999). Awareness of One's Body as Subject and Object. Philosophical Explorations 2 (1):70-76.
    This paper rejects Hume's famous claim that we never perceive our selves, by arguing that, under conditions specified, our perception of our bodies is perception of our selves. It takes as its point of departure Quassim Cassam's defence of a position to a similar effect but puts a different interpretation on the distinction between perceiving the body as an object, having spatial attributes, and perceiving it as a self or subject of experiences.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  24
    Sigrid Schmitz (2012). The Neurotechnological Cerebral Subject: Persistence of Implicit and Explicit Gender Norms in a Network of Change. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (3):261-274.
    Abstract Under the realm of neurocultures the concept of the cerebral subject emerges as the central category to define the self, socio-cultural interaction and behaviour. The brain is the reference for explaining cognitive processes and behaviour but at the same time the plastic brain is situated in current paradigms of (self)optimization on the market of meritocracy by means of neurotechnologies. This paper explores whether neurotechnological apparatuses may—due to their hybridity and malleability—bear potentials for a change in gender based attributions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  9
    Daniel Hourigan (2013). Ghost in the Shell 2 , Technicity and the Subject. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):51-67.
    This discussion examines how Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence questions what remains of being human and the assemblage of humanity when the human and the machine collide and elide their limit of differentiation. It will be shown how the film's predilection for technology in its narrative content and technological rationalism in its wider conceptual embedding reconstructs humanity but rejects the metaphysical valuation of humanity through notions of dignity, taboo, respect, affect, and so forth. By connecting this twin problematic of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  8
    Cleto Caliman (2012). Igreja, Povo de Deus, sujeito da comunhão eclesial (Church, the People of God, subject of ecclesial communion) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n24p1047. [REVIEW] Horizonte 9 (24):1047-1071.
    Aos 50 anos do início do Concílio Vaticano II, o artigo pretende articular a chave eclesiológica de sua compreensão da Igreja como povo de Deus (cap II da Lumen Gentium), com o processo de sua recepção no pós-concílio. O Sínodo Extraordinário de 1985 - aos 20 anos do término do Concílio - privilegiou a categoria “comunhão” como chave da eclesiologia conciliar. O Sínodo de 1987 sobre a Vocação e Missão do Leigo na Igreja e no Mundo expressou o desejo de (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  19
    Ilias Papagiannopoulos (2006). Re-Appraising the Subject and the Social in Western Philosophy and in Contemporary Orthodox Thought. Studies in East European Thought 58 (4):299 - 330.
    The notion of a constitutive lack, which formed the ambivalent initial framework of Western metaphysics, marks the contemporary attempt to think anew the social and the subject. While metaphysics had difficulties to justify ontologically the event of sociality and was tempted to construct a closed subjectivity, post-metaphysical thought by contrast justifies often the sociality of a non-identity. The presuppositions of Orthodox-Christian theology allow us to think of subjectivity and sociality in terms of a different ontology, elaborating a new synthesis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  7
    Manuel Callahan (2013). In defense of conviviality and the collective subject. Polis 33.
    This essay takes up the question of a “new” social paradigm by first examining the recent emergence of the U.S. Occupied Movement (OM) as a provocative and inspiring moment of political re-composition, but one that also narrates a more complex unraveling of what W.E.B Du Bois called “democratic despotism.” The most recent political tensions and economic “crisis” of the global north point to the disruption of a white “middle class” hegemony alongside inspiring moments of reconstructed conviviality. I suggest that the (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  8
    F. Sauri (1998). Bradley's Supposed Rejection of Subject-Predicate Judgements. Bradley Studies 4 (1):102-112.
    Textual evidence normally quoted to justify the claim that F. H. Bradley rejects subject - predicate judgements has other functions: namely to reject concrete interpretations of subject - predicate judgements. Bradley has his own view of subject - predicate judgement: in a judgement subject and predicate forma an adjetive which is predicated of the whole reality.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  18
    Elena Pulcini (2010). The Responsible Subject in the Global Age. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (3):447-461.
    The first thesis of this article is that the concept of responsibility takes on an unprecedented meaning in the twentieth century resulting from the emergence of a new dimension of the other: to be responsible comes to mean not just to account for oneself in relation to the other, but also to take the other into account, to take care of the other—what I call responsibility towards (the other). The main reason for this change consists in the emergence of global (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  2
    Ana Rita Silva, Maria Salomé Pinho, Céline Souchay & Christopher J. A. Moulin (2015). Evaluating the Subject-Performed Task Effect in Healthy Older Adults: Relationship with Neuropsychological Tests. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 5.
    Background : An enhancement in recall of simple instructions is found when actions are performed in comparison to when they are verbally presented – the subject-performed task effect. This enhancement has also been found with older adults. However, the reason why older adults, known to present a deficit in episodic memory, have a better performance for this type of information remains unclear. In this article, we explored this effect by comparing the performance on the SPT task with the performance (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  11
    Benedetto Lepori, Lukas Baschung & Carole Probst (2010). Patterns of Subject Mix in Higher Education Institutions: A First Empirical Analysis Using the AQUAMETH Database. Minerva 48 (1):73-99.
    Teaching and research are organised differently between subject domains: attempts to construct typologies of higher education institutions, however, often do not include quantitative indicators concerning subject mix which would allow systematic comparisons of large numbers of higher education institutions among different countries, as the availability of data for such indicators is limited. In this paper, we present an exploratory approach for the construction of such indicators. The database constructed in the AQUAMETH project, which includes also data disaggregated at (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Eric LaRock (2013). From Biological Naturalism to Emergent Subject Dualism. Philosophia Christi 15 (1):97-118.
    I argue (1) that Searle's reductive stance about mental causation is unwarranted on evolutionary, logical, and neuroscientific grounds; and (2) that his theory of weak emergence, called biological naturalism, fails to provide a satisfactory account of objectual unity and subject unity. Finally I propose a stronger variety of emergence called emergent subject dualism (ESD) to fill the gaps in Searle's account, and support ESD on grounds of recent evidence in neuroscience. Hence I show how it is possible, if (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  8
    R. Scott Webster (2007). Centring the Subject in Order to Educate. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):519–530.
    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject—or self—should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially through post‐structuralist literature. It is contended here however, that this tendency to decentre the subject has been taken to an extreme at times, especially by some designers (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Oded Balaban (1990). Subject and Consciousness: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Self-Consciousness. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Title on spine: Subject & consciousness.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Philip Barker (1993). Michel Foucault: Subversions of the Subject. St. Martin's Press.
    This unique and original study analyzes Foucault's interaction with the history of ideas, undertaking a genealogy of the subject that subverts conventional philosophical history to develop a distinctly Foucauldian intellectual history. Through a detailed account of Foucault's work and its relation to the history of ideas, Philip Barker shows how that history can be usefully reconceptualised using Foucault's concepts of genealogy and archaeology. Locating the emergence of self-reflexive consciousness in twelfth century philosophy, and elaborating upon autobiography as a philosophical (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. James M. Dow, Shoegenstein on Self-Ascription, Immunity to Error and I-as-Subject.
    Contemporary accounts of the self-ascription of experiences are wedded to two basic dogmas. The first is that self-ascription is immune to error through misidentification relative to the first person (IEM). The second dogma is that there is distinction between awareness of oneself qua subject and awareness of oneself qua object (the SCS/SCO distinction). In this paper, I urge that these dogmas are groundless. First, I illustrate that claims about immunity to error through misidentification are usually based upon claims about (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  4
    James D. Faubion (ed.) (1995). Rethinking the Subject: An Anthology of Contemporary European Social Thought. Westview Press.
    Since the early 1970s, European thinkers have departed notably from their predecessors in order to pursue analytical programs more thoroughly their own. Rethinking the Subject brings together in one volume some of the most influential writings of Foucault, Habermas, Bourdieu, Pizzorno, Macfarlane, and other authors whose ideas have had a worldwide influence in recent social history.The anthology is testament to the central importance of three contemporary themes, each familiar to earlier thinkers but never definitively formulated or resolved. The first (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  28
    Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). Emptiness as Subject-Object Unity: Sengzhao on the Way Things Truly Are. Routledge.
    Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a leading Chinese Mādhyamika philosopher, holds that the myriad things are empty, and that they are, at bottom, the same as emptiness qua the way things truly are. In this paper, I distinguish the level of the myriad things from that of the way things truly are and call them, respectively, the ontic and the ontological levels. For Sengzhao, the myriad things at the ontic level are indeterminate and empty, and he equates the way things truly are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Raṇabīra Samāddāra (2010). Emergence of the Political Subject. Sage.
    Section one : Situations. Death and dialogue -- The impossibility of settled rule -- The singular subject -- Terror, politics, and the subject -- What is resistance? -- A rebel's vision -- Section two : positions. The labour of memory -- Towards a theory of the constituent power -- Possibilities of our trans-national citizenship -- Empire, globalisation, and the subject.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  28
    Caroline Williams (2001/2005). Contemporary French Philosophy: Modernity and the Persistence of the Subject. Continuum.
    "Caroline Williams marks what is distinctive about 20th Century French philosophy's interrogation of the subject and demonstrates its historical continuity in a ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  41
    P. F. Strawson (2004). Subject and Predicate in Logic and Grammar. Ashgate.
    P.F. Strawson's essay traces some formal characteristics of logic and grammar to their roots in general features of thought and experience.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
  49.  29
    Slavoj Žižek (1999). The Ticklish Subject: The Absent Centre of Political Ontology. Verso.
    With his characteristic wit, Zizek addresses the burning question of how to reformulate a leftist project in an era of global capitalism and liberal-democratic ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
  50.  42
    Logan Paul Gage (2016). Phenomenal Conservatism and the Subject’s Perspective Objection. Acta Analytica 31 (1):43-58.
    For some years now, Michael Bergmann has urged a dilemma against internalist theories of epistemic justification. For reasons I explain below, some epistemologists have thought that Michael Huemer’s principle of Phenomenal Conservatism can split the horns of Bergmann’s dilemma. Bergmann has recently argued, however, that PC must inevitably, like all other internalist views, fall prey to his dilemma. In this paper, I explain the nature of Bergmann’s dilemma and his reasons for thinking that PC cannot escape it before arguing that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000