Search results for 'Subjectivity Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christopher Hamilton (1998). Kierkegaard on Truth as Subjectivity: Christianity, Ethics and Asceticism. Religious Studies 34 (1):61-79.score: 152.0
    This paper is an exploration and interpretation of Kierkegaard's account of Christian belief. I argue that Kierkegaard believed that the Christian metaphysical tradition was exhausted and hence that there could be no defence of belief in God in purely rational terms. I defend this interpretation against objections, going on to argue that Kierkegaard thought it possible to defend a post-metaphysical conception of religious belief. I argue that Kierkegaard thought that such a defence was available if we understand correctly what it (...)
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  2. Two Perspectives On Subjectivity (forthcoming). Lost and Found in Language: Two Perspectives on Subjectivity Hagi Kenaan. In Claudia Welz & Karl Verstrynge (eds.), Despite Oneself: Subjectivity and its Secret in Kierkegaard and Levinas. Turnshare. 31.score: 140.0
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  3. Reasonableness Of Christianity (2010). The Reasonableness of Christianity and its Vindications. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum.score: 120.0
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  4. Redistribution Subjectivity (2007). Chapter Five Subjectivity, Redistribution and Recognition Andy Blunden. In Julie Connolly, Michael Leach & Lucas Walsh (eds.), Recognition in Politics: Theory, Policy and Practice. Cambridge Scholars. 84.score: 120.0
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  5. Daniele Lorenzini (2012). Foucault, Christianity, and the Genealogy of the Regimes of Truth. Iride 25 (2):391-402.score: 90.0
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  6. Michel Henry (2003). I Am the Truth: Toward a Philosophy of Christianity. Stanford University Press.score: 66.0
    A part of the “return to religion” now evident in European philosophy, this book represents the culmination of the career of a leading phenomenological thinker whose earlier works trace a trajectory from Marx through a genealogy of psychoanalysis that interprets Descartes’s “I think, I am” as “I feel myself thinking, I am.” In this book, Henry does not ask whether Christianity is “true” or “false.” Rather, what is in question here is what Christianity considers as truth, what kind (...)
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  7. Don Cupitt (2002). Is Nothing Sacred?: The Non-Realist Philosophy of Religion: Selected Essays. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    This book contains essays written over twenty years that appear in book form for the first time.
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  8. Marko J. Fuchs (2010). Sum Und Cogito: Grundfiguren Endlichen Selbstseins Bei Augustinus Und Descartes. Ferdinand Schöningh.score: 60.0
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  9. William J. Wainwright (1995). Reason and the Heart: A Prolegomenon to a Critique of Passional Reason. Cornell University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  10. Eva Schwarz (2010). Christian Lotz. 'From Affectivity to Subjectivity. Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 26 (2):157-165.score: 50.0
  11. A. D. Smith (2008). Review of Christian Lotz, From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (8).score: 50.0
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  12. Eva Schwarz (2010). Christian Lotz, From Affectivity to Subjectivity. Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited Palgrave Macmillan, 2007, 169 Pages, Isbn 9780230535336, $74.95/€58.99. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 26 (2):157-165.score: 50.0
  13. Jeffrey Cain (2009). After Utopia: Three Post-Personal Subjects Consider the Possibilities William E. Connolly (2008) Capitalism and Christianity, American Style, Durham and London: Duke University Press.Alexander García Düttmann (2007) Philosophy of Exaggeration, Trans. James Phillips, London: Continuum.Adrian Parr (2008) Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. [REVIEW] Deleuze Studies 3 (2):138-143.score: 50.0
  14. Massimiliano Del Grosso (2007). Il Senso Comune E Il Rapporto Tra Filosofia E Teologia. Casa Editrice Leonardo da Vinci.score: 48.0
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  15. Christian Moraru (2001). The Ticklish Subject: The Absent Centre of Political Ontology, And: The Fragile Absolute, or, Why is the Christian Legacy Worth Fighting For?, And: Contingency, Hegemony, Universality: Contemporary Dialogues on the Left, And: Cosmopolitanism (Review). Symploke 9 (1):205-207.score: 42.0
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  16. Dfm Strauss (2009). The (Social) Construction of the World – at the Crossroads of Christianity and Humanism. South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (2).score: 42.0
    In early modern philosophy the motive of logical creation emerged in reaction to the Greek-Medieval legacy of a realistic metaphysics. The dominant nominalistic trends of thought since Thomas Hobbes and Immanuel Kant explored its rationalistic implications. The latter drew the radical (humanistic) conclusion that the laws of nature are present in human thought a priori (i.e. before all experience). The irrationalistic side of nominalism emphasized the uniqueness and individuality of events – thus leading to the historicism of the 19th century (...)
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  17. Richard J. Prystowsky (1994). An I for an I: Projection, Subjection, and Christian Antisemitism in The Service for Representing Adam. Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 1 (1):139-157.score: 40.0
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  18. Margaret Cormack (2010). Margaret Clunies Ross, Ed., Poetry on Christian Subjects, 1: The Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries; 2: The Fourteenth Century. (Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages, 7.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. 1: Pp. Lxix, 1–468; 1 Black-and-White Figure. 2: Pp. Iv, 469–1040. €120. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (2):377-379.score: 40.0
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  19. G. R. S. Mead (1967). The Doctrine of the Subtle Body in Western Tradition: An Outline of What the Philosophers Thought and Christians Taught on the Subject. London, Stuart & Watkins.score: 40.0
    He served as editor of The Theosophical Society's Theosophical Review, and later formed The Quest Society and edited its journal, The Quest Review.
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  20. Joona Taipale (2008). Christian Lotz: From Subjectivity to Affectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Hampshire: Palgrave, 2007 (169 Pp.). [REVIEW] SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):151-157.score: 40.0
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  21. Margaret Cormack (2010). Margaret Clunies Ross, Ed., Poetry on Christian Subjects, 1: The Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries; 2: The Fourteenth Century.(Skaldic Poetry of The. [REVIEW] Speculum 85:377-379.score: 40.0
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  22. C. C. J. Webb (1936). Riddell Memorial Lectures. Eighth Series. General Subject: Evolution and the Christian Conception of God. Delivered Before the University of Durham at Armstrong College, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, November 1935, by Charles E. Raven, D.D., Regius Professor of Divinity in the University of Cambridge. (London: Oxford University Press: Humphrey Milford. 1936. Pp. 56. Price 2s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 11 (43):360-.score: 40.0
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  23. R. Di Ceglie (2004). Critical Foundation of the Actus Essendi Between Metaphysics and Christian Thinking in the Margins of Ontological Analysis in the Subjective Proposed by PP Ruffinengo. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 96 (2-3):529-556.score: 40.0
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  24. C. L. (1958). Why I Am Not a Christian, and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects. Review of Metaphysics 11 (4):696-696.score: 40.0
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  25. Bertrand Russell (2004). Why I Am Not a Christian: And Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects. Routledge.score: 40.0
    While its tone is playful and frivolous, this book poses tough questions over the nature of religion and belief. Religion provides comfortable responses to the questions that have always beset humankind - why are we here, what is the point of being alive, how ought we to behave? Russell snatches that comfort away, leaving us instead with other, more troublesome alternatives: responsibility, autonomy, self-awareness. He tells us that the time to live is now, the place to live is here, and (...)
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  26. Sandu Frunza (2010). Aspects of the Connection Between Judaism and Christianity in Franz Rosenzweig's Philosophy. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (18):181-205.score: 38.0
    The novelty in Rosenzweig’s new ways of thinking lies in the fact that, unlike the traditional view, in his thought philosophy is the discipline containing a subjective element, whereas religion is more objective since it is founded on revelation. These complementary differences help the philosopher rethink Judaism and Jewish identity in the context of the spiritual crisis of the secularized Judaism of his time. Starting with the analysis of this reconstruction of philosophy, this text attempts to present a balanced perspective (...)
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  27. Rick Anthony Furtak (ed.) (2010). Kierkegaard's 'Concluding Unscientific Postscript': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Rick Anthony Furtak; 1. The 'Socratic secret': the postscript to the Philosophical Crumbs M. Jamie Ferreira; 2. Kierkegaard's Socratic pseudonym: a profile of Johannes Climacus Paul Muench; 3. Johannes Climacus' revocation Alastair Hannay; 4. From the garden of the dead: Johannes Climacus on religious and irreligious inwardness Edward F. Mooney; 5. The Kierkegaardian ideal of 'essential knowing' and the scandal of modern philosophy Rick Anthony Furtak; 6. Lessing and Socrates in Kierkegaard's Postscript Jacob Howland; 7. (...)
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  28. Mohd Shuhaimi Bin Ishak & Sayed Sikandar Shah Haneef (2014). Reproductive Technology: A Critical Analysis of Theological Responses in Christianity and Islam. Zygon 49 (2):396-413.score: 34.0
    Reproductive medical technology has revolutionized the natural order of human procreation. Accordingly, some have celebrated its advent as a new and liberating determinant of kinship at the global level and advocate it as a right to reproductive health while others have frowned upon it as a vehicle for “guiltless exchange of sexual fluid” and commodification of human gametes. Religious voices from both Christianity and Islam range from unthinking adoption to restrictive use. While utilizing this technology to enable the married (...)
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  29. Christian Lotz (2007). From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 32.0
    Christian Lotz shows in this book that Husserl's Phenomenology and its key concept--subjectivity--is based on a concrete anthropological structure, such as self-affection and the bodily experience of the other. The analysis of the sensual sphere and the lived Body forces Husserl to an ongoing correction of his strong methodological assumptions. Subjectivity turns out to be an ambivalent phenomenon, as the subject is unable to fully present itself to itself, and therefore is forced to allow for a fundamental non-transparency (...)
     
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  30. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2014). Unearthing Consonances in Foucault's Account of Greco‐Roman Self‐Writing and Christian Technologies of the Self. Heythrop Journal 55 (2):188-202.score: 30.0
  31. Pauline Kleingeld (2008). Romantic Cosmopolitanism: Novalis's “Christianity or Europe”. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 269-284.score: 30.0
    German Romanticism is commonly associated with nationalism rather than cosmopolitanism. Against this standard picture, I argue that the early German romantic author, Novalis (Georg Philipp Friedrich von Hardenberg, 1772–1801) holds a decidedly cosmopolitan view. Novalis’s essay “Christianity or Europe” has been the subject of much dispute and puzzlement ever since he presented it to the Jena romantic circle in the fall of 1799. On the basis of an account of the philosophical background of Novalis’s romanticism, I show that the (...)
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  32. Curtis A. Rigsby (2009). Nishida on God, Barth and Christianity. Asian Philosophy 19 (2):119 – 157.score: 30.0
    Despite the central role that the concept of God played in Kitarō Nishida's philosophy—and more broadly, within the Kyoto School which formed around Nishida—Anglophone studies of the religious philosophy of modern Japan have not seriously considered the nature and role of God in Nishida's thought. Indeed, relevant Anglophone studies even strongly suggest that where the concept of God does appear in Nishida's writings, such a concept is to be dismissed as a 'subjective fiction', a 'penultimate designation', or a peripheral Western (...)
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  33. Jason Read (2009). A Genealogy of Homo-Economicus: Neoliberalism and the Production of Subjectivity. Foucault Studies 6:25-36.score: 30.0
    This article examines Michel Foucault’s critical investigation of neoliberalism in the course published as Naissance de la biopolitique: Cours au Collège de France, 1978-1979. Foucault’s lectures are interrogated along two axes. First, examining the way in which neoliberalism can be viewed as a particular production of subjectivity, as a way in which individuals are constituted as subjects of “human capital.” Secondly, Foucault’s analyses is augmented and critically examined in light of other critical work on neoliberalism by Wendy Brown, David (...)
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  34. Ingvar Horgby (1965). Immediacy - Subjectivity - Revelation. Inquiry 8 (1-4):84 – 117.score: 30.0
    Kierkegaard's fundamental view of life was negative and Gnostic. It was through his interpretation of life that his vision of the nothingness of existence became positive. What formed the material of Kierkegaard's interpretation was the common experience of existence, what ?all? men know. His concept of existence has a threefold content : immediacy, subjectivity, and the Christian Revelation. Immediate reality that is not made content of subjectivity becomes empty changeableness, and subjectivity that does not appropriate immediacy deprives (...)
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  35. Victor Nuovo & John Locke (eds.) (1997). John Locke and Christianity: Contemporary Responses to the Reasonableness of Christianity. Thoemmes Press.score: 30.0
    The Reasonableness of Christianity is a major work by one of the greatest modern philosophers. Published anonymously in 1695, it entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labelled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions, and perhaps no one (...)
     
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  36. Timothy Lane (2015). Self, Belonging, and Conscious Experience: A Critique of Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness. In Rocco Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed consciousness: New essays on psychopathology and theories of consciousness. MIT Press.score: 24.0
    Subjectivity theories of consciousness take self-reference, somehow construed, as essential to having conscious experience. These theories differ with respect to how many levels they posit and to whether self-reference is conscious or not. But all treat self-referencing as a process that transpires at the personal level, rather than at the subpersonal level, the level of mechanism. -/- Working with conceptual resources afforded by pre-existing theories of consciousness that take self-reference to be essential, several attempts have been made to explain (...)
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  37. Pete Mandik (2001). Mental Representation and the Subjectivity of Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):179-202.score: 24.0
    Many have urged that the biggest obstacles to a physicalistic understanding of consciousness are the problems raised in connection with the subjectivity of consciousness. These problems are most acutely expressed in consideration of the knowledge argument against physicalism. I develop a novel account of the subjectivity of consciousness by explicating the ways in which mental representations may be perspectival. Crucial features of my account involve analogies between the representations involved in sensory experience and the ways in which pictorial (...)
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  38. Peter Carruthers (2004). Suffering Without Subjectivity. Philosophical Studies 121 (2):99-125.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that it is possible for suffering to occur in the absence of phenomenal consciousness – in the absence of a certain sort of experiential subjectivity, that is. (Phenomenal consciousness is the property that some mental states possess, when it is like something to undergo them, or when they have subjective feels, or possess qualia.) So even if theories of phenomenal consciousness that would withhold such consciousness from most species of non-human animal are correct, this neednt mean (...)
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  39. Alexandre Billon & Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). Jaspers' Dilemma: The Psychopathological Challenge to Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness. In R. Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed Consciousness. MIT Press.score: 24.0
    According to what we will call subjectivity theories of consciousness, there is a constitutive connection between phenomenal consciousness and subjectivity: there is something it is like for a subject to have mental state M only if M is characterized by a certain mine-ness or for-me-ness. Such theories appear to face certain psychopathological counterexamples: patients appear to report conscious experiences that lack this subjective element. A subsidiary goal of this chapter is to articulate with greater precision both subjectivity (...)
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  40. Alexandre Billon (2011). Does Consciousness Entail Subjectivity? The Puzzle of Thought Insertion. Philosophical Psychology 26 (2):291 - 314.score: 24.0
    (2013). Does consciousness entail subjectivity? The puzzle of thought insertion. Philosophical Psychology: Vol. 26, No. 2, pp. 291-314. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2011.625117.
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  41. Thomas Metzinger (2000). The Subjectivity of Subjective Experience: A Representationist Analysis of the First-Person Perspective. In , Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press. 285--306.score: 24.0
    This is a brief and accessible English summary of the "Self-model Theory of Subjectivity" (SMT), which is only available as German book in this archive. It introduces two new theoretical entities, the "phenomenal self-model" (PSM) and the "phenomenal model of the intentionality-relation" PMIR. A representationalist analysis of the phenomenal first-person persepctive is offered. This is a revised version, including two pictures.
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  42. Reinaldo Bernal Velásquez (2011). Materialism and the Subjectivity of Experience. Philosophia 39 (1):39-49.score: 24.0
    The phenomenal properties of conscious mental states happen to be exclusively accessible from the first-person perspective. Consequently, some philosophers consider their existence to be incompatible with materialist metaphysics. In this paper I criticise one particular argument that is based on the idea that for something to be real it must (at least in principle) be accessible from an intersubjective perspective. I argue that the exclusively subjective access to phenomenal contents can be explained by the very particular nature of the epistemological (...)
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  43. Luc Ciompi (2003). Reflections on the Role of Emotions in Consciousness and Subjectivity, From the Perspective of Affect-Logic. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):181-196.score: 24.0
    The phenomena of human consciousness and subjectivity are explored from the perspective of affect-logic, a comprehensive meta-theory of the interactions between emotion and cognition based mainly on cognitive and social psychology, psychopathology, neurobiology Piaget?s genetic epistemology, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary science. According to this theory, overt or covert affective-cognitive interactions are obligatorily present in all mental activity, seemingly ?neutral? thinking included. Emotions continually exert numerous so-called operator-effects, both linear and nonlinear, on attention, on memory and on comprehensive thought, or logic (...)
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  44. Kim Atkins (ed.) (2005). Self and Subjectivity. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    The book provides a comprehensive, accessible, and high-quality text that introduces the reader to various conceptions of self and subjectivity in relation to ...
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  45. Chad Kautzer (2013). Kant, Perpetual Peace, and the Colonial Origins of Modern Subjectivity. peace studies journal 6 (2):58-67.score: 24.0
    There has been a persistent misunderstanding of the nature of cosmopolitanism in Immanuel Kant’s 1795 essay “Perpetual Peace,” viewing it as a qualitative break from the bellicose natural law tradition preceding it. This misunderstanding is in part due to Kant’s explicitly critical comments about colonialism as well as his attempt to rhetorically distance his cosmopolitanism from traditional natural law theory. In this paper, I argue that the necessary foundation for Kant’s cosmopolitan subjectivity and right was forged in the experience (...)
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  46. Søren Overgaard (2004). Exposing the Conjuring Trick: Wittgenstein on Subjectivity. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (3):263-286.score: 24.0
    Since the publication of the Philosophical Investigations in 1953, Wittgenstein''s later philosophy of mind has been the subject of numerous books and articles. Although most commentators agree that Wittgenstein was neither a behaviorist nor a Cartesian dualist, many continue to ascribe to him a position that strongly resembles one of the alternatives. In contrast, this paper argues that Wittgenstein was strongly opposed to behaviorism and Cartesianism, and that he was concerned to show that these positions implicitly share a problematic assumption. (...)
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  47. Anna Mudde (2009). Risky Subjectivity: Antigone, Action, and Universal Trespass. Human Studies 32 (2):183 - 200.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I draw on the mutually implicated structures of tragedy and self-formation found in Hegel’s use of Sophocles’ Antigone in the Phenomenology. By emphasizing the apparent distinction between particular and universal in Hegel’s reading of the tragedies in Antigone, I propose that a tragedy of action (which particularizes a universal) is inescapable for subjectivity understood as socially constituted and always already socially engaged. I consider universal/particular relations in three communities: Hegel’s Greek polis, his community of conscience, and (...)
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  48. Yiftach Fehige (2013). Sexual Diversity and Divine Creation: A Tightrope Walk Between Christianity and Science. Zygon 48 (1):35-59.score: 24.0
    Although modern societies have come to recognize diversity in human sexuality as simply part of nature, many Christian communities and thinkers still have considerable difficulties with related developments in politics, legislation, and science. In fact, homosexuality is a recurrent topic in the transdisciplinary encounter between Christianity and the sciences, an encounter that is otherwise rather “asexual.” I propose that the recent emergence of “Christianity and Science” as an academic field in its own right is an important part of (...)
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  49. Peter Forrest (2010). Spinozistic Pantheism, the Environment and Christianity. Sophia 49 (4):463-473.score: 24.0
    I am not a pantheist and I don’t believe that pantheism is consistent with Christianity. My preferred speculation is what I call the Swiss Cheese theory: we and our artefacts are the holes in God, the only Godless parts of reality. In this paper, I begin by considering a world rather like ours but without any beings capable of sin. Ignoring extraterrestrials and angels we could consider the world, say, 5 million years ago. Pantheism was, I say, true at (...)
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  50. Gianfranco Soldati (2007). Subjectivity in Heterophenomenology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):89-98.score: 24.0
    I distinguish between naïve phenomenology and really existing phenomenology, a distinction that is too often ignored. As a consequence, the weaknesses inherent in naïve phenomenology are mistakenly attributed to phenomenology. I argue that the critics of naïve phenomenology have unwittingly adopted a number of precisely those weaknesses they wish to point out. More precisely, I shall argue that Dennett’s criticism of the naïve or auto-phenomenological conception of subjectivity fails to provide a better understanding of the intended phenomenon.
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