Search results for 'Substitution' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Perceptual Learning. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press
    When a user integrates a sensory substitution device into her life, the process involves perceptual learning, that is, ‘relatively long-lasting changes to an organism’s perceptual system that improve its ability to respond to its environment’ (Goldstone 1998: 585). In this paper, I explore ways in which the extensive literature on perceptual learning can be applied to help improve sensory substitution devices. I then use these findings to answer a philosophical question. Much of the philosophical debate surrounding sensory (...) devices concerns what happens after perceptual learning occurs. In particular, should the resultant perceptual experience be classified in the substituted modality (as vision), in the substituting modality (as auditory or tactile), or in a new sense modality? I propose a novel empirical test to help resolve this philosophical debate. (shrink)
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  2. David Suarez, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan & Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Non-Sensory Feelings. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press
    One of the central limitations of sensory substitution devices (SSDs) is their inability to reproduce the non-sensory feelings that are normally associated with visual experiences, especially hedonic and aesthetic responses. This limitation is sometimes reported to cause SSD users frustration. To make matters worse, it is unclear that improvements in acuity, bandwidth, or training will resolve the issue. Yet, if SSDs are to actually reproduce visual experience in its fullness, it seems that the reproduction of non-sensory feelings will be (...)
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  3. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Bodily Action and Distal Attribution in Sensory Substitution. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Proceedings of the British Academy
    According to proponents of the sensorimotor contingency theory of perception (Hurley & Noë 2003, Noë 2004, O’Regan 2011), active control of camera movement is necessary for the emergence of distal attribution in tactile-visual sensory substitution (TVSS) because it enables the subject to acquire knowledge of the way stimulation in the substituting modality varies as a function of self-initiated, bodily action. This chapter, by contrast, approaches distal attribution as a solution to a causal inference problem faced by the subject’s perceptual (...)
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  4. Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Full Report.
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the workshop on sensory substitution and augmentation at the British Academy, March 26th through 28th, 2013.
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  5.  57
    Malika Auvray & Erik Myin (2009). Perception With Compensatory Devices: From Sensory Substitution to Sensorimotor Extension. Cognitive Science 33 (6):1036–1058.
    Sensory substitution devices provide through an unusual sensory modality (the substituting modality, e.g., audition) access to features of the world that are normally accessed through another sensory modality (the substituted modality, e.g., vision). In this article, we address the question of which sensory modality the acquired perception belongs to. We have recourse to the four traditional criteria that have been used to define sensory modalities: sensory organ, stimuli, properties, and qualitative experience (Grice, 1962), to which we have added the (...)
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  6. Ophelia Deroy & Malika Auvray (2015). Beyond Vision: The Vertical Integration of Sensory Substitution Devices. In D. Stokes, M. Matthen & S. Biggs (eds.), Perception and Its Modalities. Oxford University Press
    What if a blind person could 'see' with her ears? Thanks to Sensory Substitution Devices (SSDs), blind people now have access to out-of-reach objects, a privilege reserved so far for the sighted. In this paper, we show that the philosophical debates have fundamentally been mislead to think that SSDs should be fitted among the existing senses or that they constitute a new sense. Contrary to the existing assumption that they get integrated at the sensory level, we present a new (...)
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  7. Julian Kiverstein & Mirko Farina (forthcoming). Do Sensory Substitution Extend the Conscious Mind? In Fabio Paglieri (ed.), Consciousness in interaction: the role of the natural and social context in shaping consciousness". Amsterdam: John Benjamins. John Benjamins
    Is the brain the biological substrate of consciousness? Most naturalistic philosophers of mind have supposed that the answer must obviously be «yes » to this question. However, a growing number of philosophers working in 4e (embodied, embedded, extended, enactive) cognitive science have begun to challenge this assumption, arguing instead that consciousness supervenes on the whole embodied animal in dynamic interaction with the environment. We call views that share this claim dynamic sensorimotor theories of consciousness (DSM). Clark (2009) a founder and (...)
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  8.  46
    Jamie Ward & Peter Meijer (2010). Visual Experiences in the Blind Induced by an Auditory Sensory Substitution Device. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):492-500.
    In this report, the phenomenology of two blind users of a sensory substitution device – “The vOICe” – that converts visual images to auditory signals is described. The users both report detailed visual phenomenology that developed within months of immersive use and has continued to evolve over a period of years. This visual phenomenology, although triggered through use of The vOICe, is likely to depend not only on online visualization of the auditory signal but also on the users’ previous (...)
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  9.  33
    Wesley H. Holliday, Tomohiro Hoshi & Thomas F. Icard Iii (2013). Information Dynamics and Uniform Substitution. Synthese 190 (1):31-55.
    The picture of information acquisition as the elimination of possibilities has proven fruitful in many domains, serving as a foundation for formal models in philosophy, linguistics, computer science, and economics. While the picture appears simple, its formalization in dynamic epistemic logic reveals subtleties: given a valid principle of information dynamics in the language of dynamic epistemic logic, substituting complex epistemic sentences for its atomic sentences may result in an invalid principle. In this article, we explore such failures of uniform (...). First, we give epistemic examples inspired by Moore, Fitch, and Williamson. Second, we answer affirmatively a question posed by van Benthem: can we effectively decide when every substitution instance of a given dynamic epistemic principle is valid? In technical terms, we prove the decidability of this schematic validity problem for public announcement logic (PAL and PAL-RC) over models for finitely many fully introspective agents, as well as models for infinitely many arbitrary agents. The proof of this result illuminates the reasons for the failure of uniform substitution. (shrink)
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  10.  85
    Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Report Question One.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: Does sensory substitution generate perceptual or cognitive states?
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  11.  82
    Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Question Three.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: How does sensory substitution interact with the brain’s architecture?
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  12.  71
    Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Question Four.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: Can normal non-sensory feelings be generated through sensory substitution?
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  13.  67
    Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Question Two.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: What can sensory substitution tell us about perceptual learning?
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  14.  50
    Richard G. Heck (2014). Intuition and the Substitution Argument. Analytic Philosophy 55 (1):1-30.
    The 'substitution argument' purports to demonstrate the falsity of Russellian accounts of belief-ascription by observing that, e.g., these two sentences: -/- (LC) Lois believes that Clark can fly. (LS) Lois believes that Superman can fly. -/- could have different truth-values. But what is the basis for that claim? It seems widely to be supposed, especially by Russellians, that it is simply an 'intuition', one that could then be 'explained away'. And this supposition plays an especially important role in Jennifer (...)
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  15.  57
    Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Question Five.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: What are the limitations of sensory substitution.
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  16.  69
    Brent G. Kyle (2013). Punishing and Atoning: A New Critique of Penal Substitution. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):201-218.
    The doctrine of penal substitution claims that it was good (or required) for God to punish in response to human sin, and that Christ received this punishment in our stead. I argue that this doctrine’s central factual claim—that Christ was punished by God—is mistaken. In order to punish someone, one must at least believe the recipient is responsible for an offense. But God surely did not believe the innocent Christ was responsible for an offense, let alone the offense of (...)
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  17.  20
    Henry Towsner (2005). Epsilon Substitution for Transfinite Induction. Archive for Mathematical Logic 44 (4):397-412.
    We apply Mints’ technique for proving the termination of the epsilon substitution method via cut-elimination to the system of Peano Arithmetic with Transfinite Induction given by Arai.
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  18.  10
    Anne C. Bellows & Michael W. Hamm (2001). Local Autonomy and Sustainable Development: Testing Import Substitution in More Localized Food Systems. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):271-284.
    Community initiatives to create more localized food systems ofteninclude the strategy of import substitution, i.e., increasing local foodproduction for local consumption. The purpose of this policy iseffectively to supplant some level of imported food into the region. Weargue that such action can carry social and environmental risks as wellas benefits and we have developed research parameters to measure theimpact of such strategies. Harriet Friedmann's seminal work (1991) onthe employment of import substitution by transnational corporationsprovides a framework to identify (...)
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  19.  35
    Alan Marshall (2007). Questioning Nuclear Waste Substitution: A Case Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):83-98.
    This article looks at the ethical quandaries, and their social and political context, which emerge as a result of international nuclear waste substitution. In particular it addresses the dilemmas inherent within the proposed return of nuclear waste owned by Japanese nuclear companies and currently stored in the United Kingdom. The UK company responsible for this waste, British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL), wish to substitute this high volume intermediate-level Japanese-owned radioactive waste for a much lower volume of much more highly (...)
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  20.  45
    Steven E. Boër (2009). Propositions and the Substitution Anomaly. Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (5):549 - 586.
    The Substitution Anomaly is the failure of intuitively coreferential expressions of the corresponding forms “that S” and “the proposition that S” to be intersubstitutable salva veritate under certain ‘selective’ attitudinal verbs that grammatically accept both sorts of terms as complements. The Substitution Anomaly poses a direct threat to the basic assumptions of Millianism, which predict the interchangeability of “that S” and “the proposition that S”. Jeffrey King has argued persuasively that the most plausible Millian solution is to treat (...)
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  21.  17
    Gerry Hough (2013). Anti-Substitution Intuitions and the Content of Belief Reports. Acta Analytica 29 (3):1-13.
    Philosophers of language traditionally take it that anti-substitution intuitions teach us about the content of belief reports. Jennifer Saul [1997, 2002 (with David Braun), 2007] challenges this lesson. Here I offer a response to Saul’s challenge. In the first two sections of the article, I present a common sense justification for drawing conclusions about content from anti-substitution intuitions. Then, in Sect. 3, I outline Saul’s challenge—what she calls ‘the Enlightenment Problem’. Finally, in Sect. 4, I argue that Saul’s (...)
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  22.  10
    Thomas Eichner (2010). Slutzky Equations and Substitution Effects of Risks in Terms of Mean-Variance Preferences. Theory and Decision 69 (1):17-26.
    This paper uses duality to elaborate Slutzky equations of risks in quasi-linear decision models extended by independent background risks. Wealth, substitution and total effects are characterized in terms of mean-variance preferences. It is shown that both Pratt and Zeckhauser’s proper risk aversion and Kimball’s standard risk aversion are sufficient for negative substitution effects.
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  23.  5
    T. Arai (2005). Epsilon Substitution Method for [Π0 1, Π0 1]-FIX. Archive for Mathematical Logic 44 (8):1009-1043.
    We formulate epsilon substitution method for a theory [Π0 1, Π0 1]-FIX for two steps non-monotonic Π0 1 inductive definitions. Then we give a termination proof of the H-processes based on Ackermann [1].
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  24.  4
    Toshiyasu Arai (2006). Epsilon Substitution Method for [Image] -FIX. Journal of Symbolic Logic 71 (4):1155 - 1188.
    In this paper we formulate epsilon substitution method for a theory $\Pi _{2}^{0}$-FIX for non-monotonic $\Pi _{2}^{0}$ inductive definitions. Then we give a termination proof of the H-processes based on Ackermann [1].
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  25. Mirko Farina (2013). Neither Touch nor Vision: Sensory Substitution as Artificial Synaesthesia? Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):639-655.
    Block (Trends Cogn Sci 7:285–286, 2003) and Prinz (PSYCHE 12:1–19, 2006) have defended the idea that SSD perception remains in the substituting modality (auditory or tactile). Hurley and Noë (Biol Philos 18:131–168, 2003) instead argued that after substantial training with the device, the perceptual experience that the SSD user enjoys undergoes a change, switching from tactile/auditory to visual. This debate has unfolded in something like a stalemate where, I will argue, it has become difficult to determine whether the perception acquired (...)
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  26.  2
    Stephanie C. Goodhew, Paul E. Dux, Ottmar V. Lipp & Troy A. W. Visser (2012). Understanding Recovery From Object Substitution Masking. Cognition 122 (3):405-415.
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  27.  28
    John Stewart & Olivier Gapenne (2004). Reciprocal Modelling of Active Perception of 2-D Forms in a Simple Tactile-Vision Substitution System. Minds and Machines 14 (3):309-330.
    The strategies of action employed by a human subject in order to perceive simple 2-D forms on the basis of tactile sensory feedback have been modelled by an explicit computer algorithm. The modelling process has been constrained and informed by the capacity of human subjects both to consciously describe their own strategies, and to apply explicit strategies; thus, the strategies effectively employed by the human subject have been influenced by the modelling process itself. On this basis, good qualitative and semi-quantitative (...)
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  28.  6
    Stephanie C. Goodhew, Troy A. W. Visser, Ottmar V. Lipp & Paul E. Dux (2011). Implicit Semantic Perception in Object Substitution Masking. Cognition 118 (1):130-134.
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  29.  32
    Rafal Urbaniak (2009). Bogus Singular Terms and Substitution Salva Denotatione. The Reasoner 3.
    This is the third installment of a paper which deals with comparison and evaluation of the standard slingshot argument (for the claim that all true sentences, if they refer, refer to the same object) with the doxastic formulation.
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  30.  3
    Fred L. Royer (1971). Information Processing of Visual Figures in the Digit Symbol Substitution Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (3):335-342.
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  31.  2
    Angelique T. M. Dierick‐van Daele, Cor Spreeuwenberg, Emmy W. C. C. Derckx, Job F. M. Metsemakers & Bert J. M. Vrijhoef (2008). Critical Appraisal of the Literature on Economic Evaluations of Substitution of Skills Between Professionals: A Systematic Literature Review. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (4):481-492.
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  32.  1
    W. N. Kellogg (1938). Evidence for Both Stimulus-Substitution and Original Anticipatory Responses in the Conditioning of Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (2):186.
  33. Barry Smith (1986). The Substitution Theory of Art. Grazer Philosophische Studien 25:533-557.
    In perceptual experience we are directed towards objects in a way which establishes a real relation between a mental act and its target. In reading works of fiction we enjoy experiences which manifest certain internal similarities to such relational acts, but which lack objects. The substitution theory of art attempts to provide a reason why we seek out such experiences and the artifacts which generate. Briefly, we seek out works of art because we enjoy the physiology and the phenomenology (...)
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  34.  48
    Jennifer Mather Saul (2007). Simple Sentences, Substitution, and Intuitions. Oxford University Press.
    Substitution and simple sentences -- Simple sentences and semantics -- Simple sentences and implicatures -- The enlightenment problem and a common assumption -- Abandoning (EOI) -- Beyond matching propositions -- App. A : extending the account -- App. B : belief reporting.
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  35.  3
    Jean‐Rémy Martin & François Le Corre (2015). Sensory Substitution is Substitution. Mind and Language 30 (2):209-233.
    Sensory substitution devices make use of one substituting modality to get access to environmental information normally accessed through another modality . Based on behavioural and neuroimaging data, some authors have claimed that using a vision-substituting device results in visual perception. Reviewing these data, we contend that this claim is untenable. We argue that the kind of information processed by a SSD is metamodal, so that it can be accessed through any sensory modality and that the phenomenology associated with the (...)
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  36. David Lewis (1997). Do We Believe in Penal Substitution? Philosophical Papers 26 (3):203 - 209.
    If a guilty offender is justly sentenced to be punished and an innocent volunteer agrees to be punished instead, is that any reason to leave the offender unpunished? In the context of mundane criminal justice, we mostly think not. But in a religious context, some Christians do believe in penal substitution as a theory of the atonement. However, it is not just these Christians, but most of us, who are of two minds. If the punishment is an imprisonment or (...)
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  37.  35
    Andrzej Biela (1984). The Program-Substitution in Algorithmic Logic and Algorithmic Logic with Non-Deterministic Programs. Bulletin of the Section of Logic 13 (2):69-72.
    This note presents a point of view upon the notions of programsubstitution which are the tools for proving properties of programs of algorithmic logics [5], [3] being sufficiently strong and universal to comprise almost all previously introduced theories of programming, and the so-called extended algorithmic logic [1], [2] and algorithmic logic with nondeterministic programs [4]. It appears that the mentioned substitution rule allows us to examine more deeply algorithmic properties of terms, formulas and programs. Besides the problem of Post-completeness (...)
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  38.  2
    Toshiyasu Arai (2003). Epsilon Substitution Method for ID1. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 121 (2-3):163-208.
    Hilbert proposed the epsilon substitution method as a basis for consistency proofs. Hilbert's Ansatz for finding a solving substitution for any given finite set of transfinite axioms is, starting with the null substitution S0, to correct false values step by step and thereby generate the process S0,S1,… . The problem is to show that the approximating process terminates. After Gentzen's innovation, Ackermann 162) succeeded to prove termination of the process for first order arithmetic. Inspired by G. Mints (...)
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  39.  58
    Mark C. Murphy (2009). Not Penal Substitution but Vicarious Punishment. Faith and Philosophy 26 (3):253-273.
    The penal substitution account of the Atonement fails for conceptual reasons: punishment is expressive action, condemning the party punished, and so is not transferable from a guilty to an innocent party. But there is a relative to the penal substitution view, the vicarious punishment account, that is neither conceptually nor morally objectionable. On this view, the guilty person’s punishment consists in the suffering of an innocent to whom he or she bears a special relationship. Sinful humanity is punished (...)
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  40.  69
    Robert Trueman (2012). Dolby Substitution (Where Available). Analysis 72 (1):98-102.
    Alex Oliver has offered a variety of counterexamples to Crispin Wright's Reference Principle. I suggest that these counterexamples rely on too simple a notion of substitution to be compelling. However, this is not a satisfactory place to leave the discussion: we need some alternative account of substitution in English. In his recent paper, Dolby has attempted to give just such an account. I argue that Dolby's account is viciously circular. I then draw some morals from the discussion.
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  41. Grigori Mints (1996). Strong Termination for the Epsilon Substitution Method. Journal of Symbolic Logic 61 (4):1193-1205.
    Ackermann proved termination for a special order of reductions in Hilbert's epsilon substitution method for the first order arithmetic. We establish termination for arbitrary order of reductions.
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  42. Duncan McFarland (1999). Mark Johnston's Substitution Principle: A New Counterexample? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):683-689.
    According to a subjectivist view of some concept, C, there is an a priori implication of subjective responses in C's application or possession conditions. Subjectivists who intend their view to be descriptive of our practice with C will hold that it is possible for there to be true empirical claims which explain such responses in terms of certain things being C. Mark Johnston's "missing-explanation argument" employs a substitution principle with a view to establishing that these strands of subjectivism are (...)
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  43.  2
    Toshiyasu Arai (2002). Epsilon Substitution Method for Theories of Jump Hierarchies. Archive for Mathematical Logic 41 (2):123-153.
    We formulate epsilon substitution method for theories (H)α0 of absolute jump hierarchies, and give two termination proofs of the H-process: The first proof is an adaption of Mints M, Mints-Tupailo-Buchholz MTB, i.e., based on a cut-elimination of a specially devised infinitary calculus. The second one is an adaption of Ackermann Ack. Each termination proof is based on transfinite induction up to an ordinal θ(α0+ ω)0, which is best possible.
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  44.  7
    Grigori Mints, Sergei Tupailo & Wilfried Buchholz (1996). Epsilon Substitution Method for Elementary Analysis. Archive for Mathematical Logic 35 (2):103-130.
    We formulate epsilon substitution method for elementary analysisEA (second order arithmetic with comprehension for arithmetical formulas with predicate parameters). Two proofs of its termination are presented. One uses embedding into ramified system of level one and cutelimination for this system. The second proof uses non-effective continuity argument.
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  45.  1
    V. V. Rybakov (1990). Problems of Substitution and Admissibility in the Modal System Grz and in Intuitionistic Propositional Calculus. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 50 (1):71-106.
    Questions connected with the admissibility of rules of inference and the solvability of the substitution problem for modal and intuitionistic logic are considered in an algebraic framework. The main result is the decidability of the universal theory of the free modal algebra imageω extended in signature by adding constants for free generators. As corollaries we obtain: there exists an algorithm for the recognition of admissibility of rules with parameters in the modal system Grz, the substitution problem for Grz (...)
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  46.  45
    Steven L. Porter (2004). Swinburnian Atonement and the Doctrine of Penal Substitution. Faith and Philosophy 21 (2):228-241.
    This paper is a philosophical defense of the doctrine of penal substitution. I begin with a delineation of Richard Swinburne’s satisfaction-type theory of the atonement, exposing a weakness of it which motivates a renewed look at the theory of penal substitution. In explicating a theory of penal substitution, I contend that: (i) the execution of retributive punishment is morally justified in certain cases of deliberate wrongdoing; (ii) deliberate human sin against God constitutes such a case; and (iii) (...)
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  47.  23
    Michael J. Proulx (2010). Synthetic Synaesthesia and Sensory Substitution. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):501-503.
    Visual information can be provided to blind users through sensory substitution devices that convert images into sound. Through extensive use to develop expertise, some blind users have reported visual experiences when using such a device. These blind expert users have also reported visual phenomenology to other sounds even when not using the device. The blind users acquired synthetic synaesthesia, with visual experience evoked by sounds only after gaining such expertise. Sensorimotor learning may facilitate and perhaps even be required to (...)
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  48.  8
    Tiddy Smith (forthcoming). Who’s Who?: Direct Belief and Symmetrical Substitution. Philosophia:1-5.
    According to Jonathan Berg’s Theory of Direct Belief, a belief about some individual is an unmediated dyadic relation between the believer and that individual. Berg’s thesis incorporates a Millian account of proper names, and invokes conversational implicature to explain well-known anti-substitution intuitions. In this critical note, I present a puzzle for the Theory of Direct Belief involving symmetrical substitution in false identity belief reports.
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  49. Georg Moser (2006). Ackermann's Substitution Method (Remixed). Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 142 (1):1-18.
    We aim at a conceptually clear and technically smooth investigation of Ackermann’s substitution method [W. Ackermann, Zur Widerspruchsfreiheit der Zahlentheorie, Math. Ann. 117 162–194]. Our analysis provides a direct classification of the provably recursive functions of , i.e. Peano Arithmetic framed in the ε-calculus.
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  50. Michael Proulx & Petra Stoerig (2006). Seeing Sounds and Tingling Tongues: Qualia in Synaesthesia and Sensory Substitution. Anthropology and Philosophy 7 (1/2):135-150.
    In this paper we wish to bring together two seemingly independent areas of research: synaesthesia and sensory substitution. Synaesthesia refers to a rare condition where a sensory stimulus elicits not only the sensation that stimulus evokes in its own modality, but an additional one; a synaesthete may thus hear the word “Monday”, and, in addition to hearing it, have a concurrent visual experience of a red color. Sensory substitution, in contrast, attempts to substitute a sensory modality that a (...)
     
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