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  1. Sue V. Rosser (2009). Focusing the Lenses of Feminist Theories to Reflect on Technology and Psychiatry. In James Phillips (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Technology and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
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  2. Sue V. Rosser (1992). Is There Androcentric Bias in Psychiatric Diagnosis? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (2):215-231.
    Flaws, biases, and ethical problems surrounding research and diagnosis may lead to inappropriate or inequitable treatments that exacerbate or fail to improve the misery that some individuals face due to their psychiatric conditions. Possible androcentric biases in the choice and definition of categories for diagnosis available in DSM-III-R may in turn influence the approaches of therapists to clients, particularly male therapists towards female clients. Androcentric bias in diagnosis, which may also be reflected in the values of the psychiatrist, may lead (...)
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  3. Sue V. Rosser (1989). Re-Visioning Clinical Research: Gender and the Ethics of Experimental Design. Hypatia 4 (2):125 - 139.
    Since modern medicine is based substantially in clinical medical research, the flaws and ethical problems that arise in this research as it is conceived and practiced in the United States are likely to be reflected to some extent in current medicine and its practice. This paper explores some of the ways in which clinical research has suffered from an androcentric focus in its choice and definition of problems studied, approaches and methods used in design and interpretation of experiments, and theories (...)
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  4. Sue V. Rosser (1987). Feminist Scholarship in the Sciences: Where Are We Now and When Can We Expect A Theoretical Breakthrough? Hypatia 2 (3):5 - 17.
    The work of feminists in science may seem less voluminous and less theoretical than the feminist scholarship in some humanities and social science disciplines. However, the recent burst of scholarship on women and science allows categorization of feminist work into six distinct but related categories: 1) teaching and curriculum transformation in science, 2) history of women in science, 3) current status of women in science, 4) feminist critique of science, 5) feminine science, 6) feminist theory of science. More feminists in (...)
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  5. Sue V. Rosser (1986). The Relationship Between Women's Studies and Women in Science. In Ruth Bleier (ed.), Feminist Approaches to Science. Pergamon Press. 165--80.
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