Search results for 'Suffering Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. P. J. Saher (1977). The Conquest of Suffering: An Enlarged Anthology of George Grimm's Works on Buddhist Philosophy and Metaphysics. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 180.0
     
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  2. John Peacock (2008). Suffering in Mind: The Aetiology of Suffering in Early Buddhism. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):209-226.score: 126.0
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  3. John Holder (2007). A Suffering (but Not Irreparable) Nature: Environmental Ethics From the Perspective of Early Buddhism. Contemporary Buddhism 8 (2):113-130.score: 126.0
  4. Paul O. Ingram (2006). Martin Luther and Buddhism: The Aesthetics of Suffering (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 26 (1):235-237.score: 126.0
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  5. Judith Simmer-Brown (forthcoming). Suffering and Social Justice: A Buddhist Response to the Gospel of Luke. Buddhist-Christian Studies.score: 126.0
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  6. Father Ryan Thomas (2003). Catholic and Buddhist Monastics Focus on Suffering. Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):143-145.score: 126.0
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  7. Ronald Y. Nakasone (1993). Suffering and Healing: An Interpretation of the Buddhist Doctrine of the Four Noble Truths. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 14 (2):81-87.score: 126.0
    The Buddha's method of spiritual release is crystallized in the Four Noble Truths. The Four Truths profile the condition of an individual's life. It explains the cause of suffering, the means through which an individual residing in a transient world can extract oneself from samsara and propel oneself into an abiding spiritual reality or nirvana. This four stage method parallels the principles of diagnosis, etiology, recovery or health, and therapeutics, which are employed by physicians in their clinical practice. This (...)
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  8. James Low (2000). The Structures of Suffering: Tibetan Buddhist and Cognitive Analytic Approaches. In Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.), The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser. 250--270.score: 126.0
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  9. Mv Ramkumar Ratnam (2005). Self and Suffering in Early Buddhism. In G. Kamalakar & M. Veerender (eds.), Buddhism: Art, Architecture, Literature & Philosophy. Sharada Pub. House. 315.score: 126.0
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  10. Father Ryan Thomas (2005). Gethsemani II: Catholic and Buddhist Monastics Focus on Suffering. Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):249-251.score: 126.0
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  11. David J. Kalupahana (1977). The Notion of Suffering in Early Buddhism Compared with Some Reflections of Early Wittgenstein. Philosophy East and West 27 (4):423-431.score: 120.0
  12. Stephen E. Harris (forthcoming). Suffering and the Shape of Well-Being in Buddhist Ethics. Asian Philosophy:1-18.score: 120.0
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  13. Eilís Ward (2013). Human Suffering and the Quest for Cosmopolitan Solidarity: A Buddhist Perspective. Journal of International Political Theory 9 (2):136-154.score: 120.0
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  14. Nathan Katz (1983). Buddhism and Marxism on Alienation and Suffering. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 10:255-261.score: 120.0
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  15. Ashok Vohra (2012). The Notion of Suffering in Buddhism and Marxism. Dialectics and Humanism 10 (4):97-101.score: 120.0
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  16. Hervé Barreau (2001). The Meaning of Suffering in Buddhism and Christianity. In. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Evandro Agazzi (eds.), Life Interpretation and the Sense of Illness Within the Human Condition. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 195--201.score: 120.0
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  17. Lynette Boling (2005). Professor Ferraiolo Philosophy 6 30 Nov. 2005 Buddhism: A Way to End Suffering. Philosophy 6:30.score: 120.0
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  18. Stephen Harris (2010). Antifoundationalism and the Commitment to Reducing Suffering in Rorty and Madhyamaka Buddhism. Contemporary Pragmatism 7 (2):71-89.score: 120.0
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  19. O. Moad (2004). Dukkha, Inaction and Nirvana: Suffering, Weariness and Death? A Look at Nietzsche's Criticisms of Buddhist Philosophy. The Philosopher 92 (1).score: 120.0
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  20. Nalini Bhushan (2008). Toward an Anatomy of Mourning: Discipline, Devotion and Liberation in a Freudian-Buddhist Framework. Sophia 47 (1):57-69.score: 102.0
    In this essay I first articulate what I take to be an influential and for the most part persuasive model in the western psychoanalytic tradition that is a response to tragic loss, namely, the one that we find in Freud’s little essay entitled ‘Mourning and Melancholia’ (1917). I then use a well-known Buddhist folk tale about the plight of a young woman named Kisagotami to underscore central elements from Buddhist psychology on the subject of suffering that is a consequence (...)
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  21. Kate Crosby (2008). Kamma, Social Collapse or Geophysics? Interpretations of Suffering Among Sri Lankan Buddhists in the Immediate Aftermath of the 2004 Asian Tsunami. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (1):53-76.score: 66.0
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  22. Antoine Panaioti (2012). Nietzsche and Buddhist Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Nihilism and Buddhism: 1. Nietzsche as Buddha; 2. Nietzsche as anti-Buddha; Part II. Suffering: 3. Amor Fati and the affirmation of suffering; 4. Nirvana and the cessation of suffering; Part III. Compassion: 5. Overcoming compassion; 6. Cultivating compassion; Conclusion: toward a new response to the challenge of nihilism.
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  23. Tuck Wai Chan & Desley Hegney (2012). Buddhism and Medical Futility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):433-438.score: 66.0
    Religious faith and medicine combine harmoniously in Buddhist views, each in its own way helping Buddhists enjoy a more fruitful existence. Health care providers need to understand the spiritual needs of patients in order to provide better care, especially for the terminally ill. Using a recently reported case to guide the reader, this paper examines the issue of medical futility from a Buddhist perspective. Important concepts discussed include compassion, suffering, and the significance of the mind. Compassion from a health (...)
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  24. Sheridan Hough (2012). Would Sartre Have Suffered From Nausea If He Had Understood the Buddhist No-Self Doctrine? Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):99-112.score: 64.0
    The central character in Sartre's 1938 novel La Nausée, Antoine Roquentin, has lost his sense of things, and now the world appears to him as utterly unstable. Roquentin suffers from what he calls ?nausea,? a condition caused by an ontological intuition that the self, as well as the world through which that ?self? moves, lacks a substantial nature. The novel portrays Sartre's own philosophical account of the self in La transcendence de l'égo. Here Sartre argues that Husserl's account of consciousness (...)
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  25. Christopher Moreman (2008). A Modern Meditation on Death: Identifying Buddhist Teachings in George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):151-165.score: 60.0
    A confluence of increasing interest in popular culture as a source for religious inspiration and the growing interest, both popular and scholarly, in zombie-fiction bring together several possibilities for scholarship in the context of religious studies. This paper will present one aspect of the zombie-craze in the light of Buddhist philosophy. The Buddha taught that the illusion of self-ish-ness, and resulting attachments, are the greatest hurdles to achieving nibbana. Through meditating on the decomposing corpse, Buddhists may come to realize the (...)
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  26. Donna M. Giancola, Buddhist Doctrines of Identity and Impermanence in the Western Mind.score: 60.0
    In Buddhism the idea of a transcendental or eternal self is denied as non-substantial and impermanent: a non-verifiable metaphysical entity that leads to grasping, craving and suffering. Buddhism posits that things continually change, are continually reducible and recyclable, and that no inherent existence or metaphysical “self” exists but rather a series of aggregates give rise to the experience so that consciousness itself is causally conditioned. As applied to the notion of no- self the one who is reborn (...)
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  27. Pinit Ratanakul (1988). Bioethics in Thailand: The Struggle for Buddhist Solutions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (3):301-312.score: 60.0
    The Thai concern for bioethics has been stimulated by the departure of Thai medicine from its long tradition through the introduction of Western medical models. Bioethics is now being taught to Thai medical students emphasizing moral insights and principles found within Thai culture. These are to a large extent Buddhist themes. Veracity is always a duty for people in general and medical personnel in particular. Falsehoods and deception cannot be morally justified simply on the grounds that we think it is (...)
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  28. Michael Slott (2011). Can You Be a Buddhist and a Marxist? Contemporary Buddhism 12 (2):347-363.score: 60.0
    Both Buddhism and Marxism have strengths and weaknesses in helping us to understand human experiences and social problems. Rather than trying to create a synthesis of the two perspectives, I attempt to discern the elements in each which can help us experience better lives and be more effective political activists. Buddhism identifies those understandings and practices which lead to greater happiness and less suffering in response to existential challenges that we all must face as mortal human beings, (...)
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  29. Gerald Dōkō Virtbauer (2010). Dimensions of Intersubjectivity in Mahayana-Buddhism and Relational Psychoanalysis. Contemporary Buddhism 11 (1):85-102.score: 60.0
    Buddhism has become one of the main dialogue partners for different psychotherapeutic approaches. As a psychological ethical system, it offers structural elements that are compatible with psychotherapeutic theory and practice. A main concept in Mah?y?na-Buddhism and postmodern psychoanalysis is intersubjectivity. In relational psychoanalysis the individual is analysed within a matrix of relationships that turn out to be the central power in her/his psychological development. By realising why one has become the present individual and how personal development is connected (...)
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  30. Christian Lindtner (1999). From Brahmanism to Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 9 (1):5 – 37.score: 54.0
    It is argued that early (canonical) Buddhism to a very considerable extent can and should be seen as reformed Brahmanism. Speculations about cosmogony in Buddhist s tras can be traced back to Vedic sources, above all R gveda 10.129 & 10.90—two hymns that play a similar fundamental role in the early Upanisads. Like the immortal and unmanifest Brahman and the mortal and manifest Brahm , the Buddha, as a mythological Bhagavat, also had two forms (or bodies). In his (...)
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  31. Deane Curtin (1996). A State of Mind Like Water: Ecosophy T and the Buddhist Traditions. Inquiry 39 (2):239 – 253.score: 54.0
    Arne Naess has come under many influences, most notably Gandhi and Spinoza. The Buddhist influence on his work, though less pervasive, provides the most direct account of key deep ecological concepts such as Self?realization and intrinsic value. I read Ecosophy T as a rigorously phenomenological branch of Deep Ecology. like early Buddhism, Naess responds to the human suffering that causes environmental destruction by challenging us to return to the reality of lived experience. This Buddhist reading clarifies, but it (...)
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  32. David F. Burton (2002). Knowledge and Liberation: Philosophical Ruminations on a Buddhist Conundrum. Philosophy East and West 52 (3):326 - 345.score: 54.0
    A philosophical analysis is offered of the relationship between knowledge and liberation in Buddhism. Buddhists often consider the knowledge of impermanence as a key to liberation from craving, attachment, and hence suffering. However, it can be objected that one may know that things are impermanent and yet still be subject to craving and attachment. In the face of this objection, critical consideration is given to five ways in which one might preserve the claim that a knowledge of things (...)
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  33. M. T. Kapstein (2005). The Buddhist Refusal of Theism. Diogenes 52 (1):61-65.score: 54.0
    Early Buddhism was not interested in questions about existence and the nature of God, considering these unimportant in relation to the question of the release from earthly suffering which is at the heart of Buddhist soteriology. Later Buddhist thought considered theism incompatible with Buddhist doctrine, but at the same time Buddhism developed a dimension of devotion that resembled theistic faith. Conscious of their different religious heritage, Buddhist thinkers in more recent times have nevertheless embraced dialogue with monotheistic (...)
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  34. R. K. Payne (1987). The Theory of Meaning in Buddhist Logicians: The Historical and Intellectual Context of Apoha. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (3):261-284.score: 54.0
    These supporting concepts enable us to much more adequately understand the meaning of apoha. First, a sharp distinction is drawn between the real and the conceptual; the real is particular, unique, momentary and the basis of perception, while the conceptual is universal, general, only supposedly objective and the basis of language. Second, the complex nature of negation discloses the kind of negation meant by apoha. Negation by implication is seen as disclosing the necessary relation between simple affirmations and simple negations. (...)
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  35. David Burton (2002). Knowledge and Liberation: Philosophical Ruminations on a Buddhist Conundrum. Philosophy East and West 52 (3):326-345.score: 54.0
    A philosophical analysis is offered of the relationship between knowledge and liberation in Buddhism. Buddhists often consider the knowledge of impermanence as a key to liberation from craving, attachment, and hence suffering. However, it can be objected that one may know that things are impermanent and yet still be subject to craving and attachment. In the face of this objection, critical consideration is given to five ways in which one might preserve the claim that a knowledge of things (...)
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  36. Ron Epstein, Buddhism and Measure H: Banning the Growing and Raising of Genetically Modified Organisms in Mendocino County.score: 54.0
    I would like to thank the Sangha for inviting me to speak with you tonight. Some of you may be wondering what Measure H has to do with the Buddhadharma and why we are taking time during the period for sutra lectures to discuss it. I think it's very important to remember that all dharmas are Buddhadharmas, and that the Venerable Master Hua taught us that we have a responsibility towards the country in which we are living. (...) This is one of the few places in the world where we can freely practice Buddhism without interference or oppression from the government. This is a democratic country in which the principle of freedom of religion is practiced. In order to protect freedom of religion and to maintain the democracy in this country, all the people in the country, including us-both lay Buddhists and monastic Buddhists-must act responsibly. If you are a citizen, you have the responsibility to vote intelligently. If you are a teacher, you have a responsibility to teach the students how to be knowledgeable and responsible citizens of this country. And if you are student, you should learn what it means to be a responsible citizen. And if you are in none of those categories, you still have a responsibility to do whatever you can to lessen the suffering of all the sentient beings in this country. That is why it is important that you understand about Measure H and its relationship to the Buddhadharma. (shrink)
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  37. Simon P. James (2006). Buddhism and the Ethics of Species Conservation. Environmental Values 15 (1):85 - 97.score: 54.0
    Efforts to conserve endangered species of animal are, in some important respects, at odds with Buddhist ethics. On the one hand, being abstract entities, species cannot suffer, and so cannot be proper objects of compassion or similar moral virtues. On the other, Buddhist commitments to equanimity tend to militate against the idea that the individual members of endangered species have greater value than those of less-threatened ones. This paper suggests that the contribution of Buddhism to the issue of species (...)
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  38. Toji Kamata (2008). A Study of Relationship Between Shinto and Japanese Buddhism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:113-118.score: 54.0
    In complete distinction to the world or universal religions like Christianity and Buddhism, Shinto is an ethnic religion that has grown out of the history and culture of the Japanese people. Shinto is a way of prayer and festivals that arose from a feeling of awe and reverence towards those entities the Japanese feared and respected as "KAMA (gods, divinities)", whereas Buddhism is a system of belief and practice leading to realization and the attainment of Buddhahood. We can (...)
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  39. Lucinda Peach (2008). Buddhist Perspectives on Positive Peace. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:585-591.score: 54.0
    The so-called “war on terror” launched by the United States following 9/11 is only the latest in an ongoing strategy of responding to conflict around the world with military violence and armed force. These interventions appear to be premised on a belief that there is no alternative to using violence and armed force to resolve conflicts because human beings have fixed and unchanging identities which are either “with us or against us,” “friends or enemies,” “good or evil.” In contrast, despite (...)
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  40. Debika Saha (2008). Early Buddhist Thought and Post-Modernism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:237-244.score: 54.0
    Buddhism traces its origin to the teachings of the historical figure of Gautama, the Buddha. Buddhist system addresses perennial human concerns and articulates profound insights into human nature and thus provides a practical context against the back ground of which it is possible to unravel the meaning of lives. Different branches of this school developed various scriptural traditions. Among them early Buddhist thought branched out into diversity of orders, schools of thought and teaching lineages. Wisdom and compassion are the (...)
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  41. P. Bilimoria & Mohanty (eds.) (2003). Relativism, Suffering and Beyond: Essays in Memory of Bimal K. Matilal. OUP India.score: 54.0
    In this collection of essays in memory of Professor Bimal K. Matilal, an international body of scholars discuss Vedanta, Nyaya and Buddhism; thematically they deal with problems of relativism, evil, suffering, emotions and value judgement.
     
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  42. Bimal Krishna Matilal, Jitendranath Mohanty & Purusottama Bilimoria (eds.) (1997). Relativism, Suffering, and Beyond: Essays in Memory of Bimal K. Matilal. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    The essays in this collection were written by an international body of scholars in memory of Professor Bimal K. Matilal. They discuss Vedanta, Nyaya, and Buddhism; thematically they deal with problems of relativism, evil, suffering, emotions, and value judgement.
     
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  43. Padmasiri De Silva (1992). Buddhist and Freudian Psychology. Singapore University Press, National University of Singapore.score: 48.0
    The work presents in clear focus, comparative perspectives on the nature of Man, Mind, Motivation, Conflict, Anxiety and Suffering, as well as the therapeutic ...
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  44. John D. Teasdale & Michael Chaskalson (2011). How Does Mindfulness Transform Suffering? I: The Nature and Origins of Dukkha. Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):89--102.score: 42.0
    This, the first of two linked papers, presents the Buddha's analysis of the nature and origins of dukkha (suffering) as a basis for understanding the ways in which mindfulness can transform suffering. The First and Second of the Buddha's Four Noble Truths are presented in a way that has proved helpful to teachers of mindfulness-based applications. These Truths offer a framework of understanding that can guide the application of mindfulness to stress and emotional disorders, while stressing the continuity (...)
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  45. Michael Chaskalson & John D. Teasdale (2011). How Does Mindfulness Transform Suffering? II: The Transformation of Dukkha. Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):103--124.score: 42.0
    Mindfulness transforms suffering through changes in what the mind is processing, changes in how the mind is processing it, and changes in the view of what is being processed. The ?bearing in mind? aspect of mindfulness is important in understanding these changes, and is discussed in terms of working memory. The Interacting Cognitive Subsystems perspective recognizes two kinds of meaning, one explicit and specific, the other implicit and holistic. We suggest that mindfulness is a configuration of mind in which (...)
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  46. Christina Feldman & Willem Kuyken (2011). Compassion in the Landscape of Suffering. Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):143--155.score: 42.0
    In this paper we investigate compassion and its place within mindfulness-based approaches. Compassion is an orientation of mind that recognizes pain and the universality of pain in human experience and the capacity to meet that pain with kindness, empathy, equanimity and patience. We outline how learning to meet pain with compassion is part of how people come to live with chronic conditions like recurrent depression. While most mindfulness-based approaches do not explicitly teach compassion, we describe how the structure of the (...)
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  47. Wei-Tau Lee, James A. Blumenthal & I. I. Kenneth H. Funk (2014). A Buddhist Perspective on Industrial Engineering and the Design of Work. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):551-569.score: 38.0
    The modern way of life is highly dependent upon the production of goods by industrial organizations that are in turn dependent upon their workers for their ongoing operations. Even though more than a century has passed since the dawn of the industrial revolution, many dangerous aspects of work, both physical and mental, remain in the workplace today. Using Buddhist philosophical principles, this paper suggests that although many sources of the problem reside within the larger society, the industrial engineer is still (...)
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  48. Christopher W. Gowans (2003). Philosophy of the Buddha. Routledge.score: 36.0
    Philosophy of the Buddha is a philosophical introduction to the teaching of the Buddha. It carefully guides readers through the basic ideas and practices of the Buddha, including kamma (karma), rebirth, the not-self doctrine, the Four <span class='Hi'>Noble</span> Truths, the Eightfold Path, ethics, meditation, nonattachment, and Nibbâna (Nirvana). The book includes an account of the life of the Buddha as well as comparisons of his teaching with practical and theoretical aspects of some Western philosophical outlooks, both ancient and modern. Most (...)
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  49. Giuliano Giustarini (2012). The Role of Fear (Bhaya) in the Nikāyas and in the Abhidhamma. Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (5):511-531.score: 36.0
    According to Buddhist soteriology, fear is a direct cause of suffering and one of the main obstacles in the path to liberation. Pāli Suttas and Abhidhamma present a number of sophisticated strategies to deal with fear and to overcome it. Nevertheless, in the Nikāyas and in the Abhidhamma there are also consistent instructions about implementing fear in meditative practices and considering it as a valuable ally in the pursuit of nibbāna By means of a lexicographical study of selected passages (...)
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  50. Langdon Gilkey (forthcoming). The Christian Understanding of Suffering. Buddhist-Christian Studies.score: 36.0
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