Search results for 'Suffering Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  52
    Stephen E. Harris (2014). Suffering and the Shape of Well-Being in Buddhist Ethics. Asian Philosophy 24 (3):242-259.
    This article explores the defense Indian Buddhist texts make in support of their conceptions of lives that are good for an individual. This defense occurs, largely, through their analysis of ordinary experience as being saturated by subtle forms of suffering . I begin by explicating the most influential of the Buddhist taxonomies of suffering: the threefold division into explicit suffering , the suffering of change , and conditioned suffering . Next, I sketch the three theories (...)
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  2. P. J. Saher (1977). The Conquest of Suffering: An Enlarged Anthology of George Grimm's Works on Buddhist Philosophy and Metaphysics. Motilal Banarsidass.
     
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  3.  3
    John D. Dadosky (2015). The Transformation of Suffering in Paul of the Cross, Lonergan and Buddhism. New Blackfriars 96 (1065):542-563.
    This paper explores St. Paul of the Cross's passion-centred spirituality as a context for avoiding the distortions of such spirituality and promoting proper praxis. These distortions are not the legacy of Paul of the Cross himself, but the fact that his contemplation of the passion was primarily performative and mystical, along with the lack of a systematic theology on the passion-death-and resurrection, there remains a context wherein distortions of passion-centred approaches can occur. The paper then presents some aspects of Bernard (...)
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  4.  9
    Eilís Ward (2013). Human Suffering and the Quest for Cosmopolitan Solidarity: A Buddhist Perspective. Journal of International Political Theory 9 (2):136-154.
    This article argues that Buddhist social thought offers valuable insight into debates about cosmopolitan solidarity by raising cosmopolitanism's need to explore more deeply the relationship between the nature of self and the politics of solidarity. It suggests that a radical ‘socio-existential’ account of the individual, which rejects a conception of the self as autonomous and separate from others, mitigates categories of exclusion and offers a robust account of the possibility of solidarity with strangers. Buddhist thought theorises a movement from (...) to solidarity that does not recognise borders or boundaries as containing inherent ethical value. (shrink)
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  5.  1
    Stephen Harris (2010). Antifoundationalism and the Commitment to Reducing Suffering in Rorty and Madhyamaka Buddhism. Contemporary Pragmatism 7 (2):71-89.
    In his Contingency, Irony, Solidarity, Richard Rorty argues that one can be both a liberal and also an antifoundationalist ironist committed to private self creation. The liberal commitments of Rorty's ironists are likely to be in conflict with his commitment to self creation, since many identities will undercut commitments to reducing suffering. I turn to the antifoundationalist Buddhist Madhyamaka tradition to offer an example of a version of antifoundationalism that escapes this dilemma. The Madhyamaka Buddhist, I argue, because of (...)
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  6.  17
    Father Ryan Thomas (2005). Gethsemani II: Catholic and Buddhist Monastics Focus on Suffering. Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):249-251.
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  7.  24
    John Peacock (2008). Suffering in Mind: The Aetiology of Suffering in Early Buddhism. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):209-226.
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  8.  8
    John Holder (2007). A Suffering (but Not Irreparable) Nature: Environmental Ethics From the Perspective of Early Buddhism. Contemporary Buddhism 8 (2):113-130.
  9.  14
    Father Ryan Thomas (2003). Catholic and Buddhist Monastics Focus on Suffering. Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):143-145.
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  10.  9
    Ronald Y. Nakasone (1993). Suffering and Healing: An Interpretation of the Buddhist Doctrine of the Four Noble Truths. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 14 (2):81-87.
    The Buddha's method of spiritual release is crystallized in the Four Noble Truths. The Four Truths profile the condition of an individual's life. It explains the cause of suffering, the means through which an individual residing in a transient world can extract oneself from samsara and propel oneself into an abiding spiritual reality or nirvana. This four stage method parallels the principles of diagnosis, etiology, recovery or health, and therapeutics, which are employed by physicians in their clinical practice. This (...)
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  11.  2
    Sulak Sivaraksa (2014). Ecological Suffering: From a Buddhist Perspective. Buddhist-Christian Studies 34 (1):147-153.
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  12.  6
    Paul O. Ingram (2006). Martin Luther and Buddhism: The Aesthetics of Suffering (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 26 (1):235-237.
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  13.  1
    Rita M. Gross (2014). The Suffering of Sexism: Buddhist Perspectives and Experiences. Buddhist-Christian Studies 34 (1):69-81.
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  14.  3
    Judith Simmer-Brown (forthcoming). Suffering and Social Justice: A Buddhist Response to the Gospel of Luke. Buddhist-Christian Studies.
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  15. James Low (2000). The Structures of Suffering: Tibetan Buddhist and Cognitive Analytic Approaches. In Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.), The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser 250--270.
     
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  16. Mv Ramkumar Ratnam (2005). Self and Suffering in Early Buddhism. In G. Kamalakar & M. Veerender (eds.), Buddhism: Art, Architecture, Literature & Philosophy. Sharada Pub. House 315.
     
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  17. O. Moad (2004). Dukkha, Inaction and Nirvana: Suffering, Weariness and Death? A Look at Nietzsche's Criticisms of Buddhist Philosophy. The Philosopher 92 (1).
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  18.  6
    Amy K. Donahue (2014). Suffering Free Markets: A "Classical" Buddhist Critique of Capitalist Conceptions of "Value". Philosophy East and West 64 (4):866-886.
    Given the public’s affective responses to volatile global financial markets in recent years, one might expect that “we” as a society would interrogate capitalist conceptions of “value.” After all, if flows of abstract capital are untethered from tangible realities, as the 2008 collapse of global financial markets showed they can be, and if the supposedly concrete gains that people earn from their labors, such as pensions and salaries, remain vulnerable to the vicissitudes of this abstraction, then capitalism’s promises might be (...)
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  19.  6
    Nathan Katz (1983). Buddhism and Marxism on Alienation and Suffering. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 10 (3):255-261.
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  20.  20
    David J. Kalupahana (1977). The Notion of Suffering in Early Buddhism Compared with Some Reflections of Early Wittgenstein. Philosophy East and West 27 (4):423-431.
  21.  5
    Ashok Vohra (2012). The Notion of Suffering in Buddhism and Marxism. Dialectics and Humanism 10 (4):97-101.
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  22.  2
    Hervé Barreau (2001). The Meaning of Suffering in Buddhism and Christianity. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Evandro Agazzi (eds.), Life Interpretation and the Sense of Illness Within the Human Condition. Kluwer Academic Publishers 195--201.
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  23. Lynette Boling (2005). Professor Ferraiolo Philosophy 6 30 Nov. 2005 Buddhism: A Way to End Suffering. Philosophy 6:30.
     
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  24.  33
    Nalini Bhushan (2008). Toward an Anatomy of Mourning: Discipline, Devotion and Liberation in a Freudian-Buddhist Framework. Sophia 47 (1):57-69.
    In this essay I first articulate what I take to be an influential and for the most part persuasive model in the western psychoanalytic tradition that is a response to tragic loss, namely, the one that we find in Freud’s little essay entitled ‘Mourning and Melancholia’ (1917). I then use a well-known Buddhist folk tale about the plight of a young woman named Kisagotami to underscore central elements from Buddhist psychology on the subject of suffering that is a consequence (...)
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  25.  7
    Philip A. Mellor (1991). Self and Suffering: Deconstruction and Reflexive Definition in Buddhism and Christianity. Religious Studies 27 (1):49 - 63.
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  26. Finn Janning (2014). True Detective: Buddhism, Pessimism or Philosophy? Journal of Philosophy of Life 4 (4).
    The aim of this paper is to raise two questions. The first question is: How is pessimism related to Buddhism (and vice versa)? The second question is: What relation does an immanent philosophy have to pessimism and Buddhism, if any? Using True Detective, an American television crime drama, as my point of departure, first I will outline some of the likenesses between Buddhism and pessimism. At the same time, I will show how the conduct of one of (...)
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  27.  6
    Tuck Wai Chan & Desley Hegney (2012). Buddhism and Medical Futility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):433-438.
    Religious faith and medicine combine harmoniously in Buddhist views, each in its own way helping Buddhists enjoy a more fruitful existence. Health care providers need to understand the spiritual needs of patients in order to provide better care, especially for the terminally ill. Using a recently reported case to guide the reader, this paper examines the issue of medical futility from a Buddhist perspective. Important concepts discussed include compassion, suffering, and the significance of the mind. Compassion from a health (...)
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  28. Purusottama Bilimoria & Jitendranath Mohanty (eds.) (2003). Relativism, Suffering and Beyond: Essays in Memory of Bimal K. Matilal. OUP India.
    In this collection of essays in memory of Professor Bimal K. Matilal, an international body of scholars discuss Vedanta, Nyaya and Buddhism; thematically they deal with problems of relativism, evil, suffering, emotions and value judgement.
     
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  29.  16
    Antoine Panaioti (2012). Nietzsche and Buddhist Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Nihilism and Buddhism: 1. Nietzsche as Buddha; 2. Nietzsche as anti-Buddha; Part II. Suffering: 3. Amor Fati and the affirmation of suffering; 4. Nirvana and the cessation of suffering; Part III. Compassion: 5. Overcoming compassion; 6. Cultivating compassion; Conclusion: toward a new response to the challenge of nihilism.
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  30. Randall Studstill (2008). Buddhist Egoism and Other Infelicities. Ars Disputandi 8:1566-5399.
    This article is an evaluation of Christian views about Buddhism based on Paul Williams’ The Unexpected Way: On Converting from Buddhism to Catholicism . Studstill focuses specifically on five Christian claims about Buddhism: Buddhism prevents the recognition of objective reality and objective truth, Buddhism promotes egoism, Buddhism encourages immorality, Buddhism is quite possibly irrational, and Buddhism is excessively pessimistic. Studstill critically examines Williams’ defense of these claims and concludes that each is either (...)
     
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  31.  33
    Donna M. Giancola, Buddhist Doctrines of Identity and Impermanence in the Western Mind.
    In Buddhism the idea of a transcendental or eternal self is denied as non-substantial and impermanent: a non-verifiable metaphysical entity that leads to grasping, craving and suffering. Buddhism posits that things continually change, are continually reducible and recyclable, and that no inherent existence or metaphysical “self” exists but rather a series of aggregates give rise to the experience so that consciousness itself is causally conditioned. As applied to the notion of no- self the one who is reborn (...)
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  32.  10
    Pinit Ratanakul (1988). Bioethics in Thailand: The Struggle for Buddhist Solutions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (3):301-312.
    The Thai concern for bioethics has been stimulated by the departure of Thai medicine from its long tradition through the introduction of Western medical models. Bioethics is now being taught to Thai medical students emphasizing moral insights and principles found within Thai culture. These are to a large extent Buddhist themes. Veracity is always a duty for people in general and medical personnel in particular. Falsehoods and deception cannot be morally justified simply on the grounds that we think it is (...)
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  33.  15
    Gerald Dōkō Virtbauer (2010). Dimensions of Intersubjectivity in Mahayana-Buddhism and Relational Psychoanalysis. Contemporary Buddhism 11 (1):85-102.
    Buddhism has become one of the main dialogue partners for different psychotherapeutic approaches. As a psychological ethical system, it offers structural elements that are compatible with psychotherapeutic theory and practice. A main concept in Mah?y?na-Buddhism and postmodern psychoanalysis is intersubjectivity. In relational psychoanalysis the individual is analysed within a matrix of relationships that turn out to be the central power in her/his psychological development. By realising why one has become the present individual and how personal development is connected (...)
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  34.  15
    Christopher Moreman (2008). A Modern Meditation on Death: Identifying Buddhist Teachings in George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):151-165.
    A confluence of increasing interest in popular culture as a source for religious inspiration and the growing interest, both popular and scholarly, in zombie-fiction bring together several possibilities for scholarship in the context of religious studies. This paper will present one aspect of the zombie-craze in the light of Buddhist philosophy. The Buddha taught that the illusion of self-ish-ness, and resulting attachments, are the greatest hurdles to achieving nibbana. Through meditating on the decomposing corpse, Buddhists may come to realize the (...)
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  35.  10
    Michael Slott (2011). Can You Be a Buddhist and a Marxist? Contemporary Buddhism 12 (2):347-363.
    Both Buddhism and Marxism have strengths and weaknesses in helping us to understand human experiences and social problems. Rather than trying to create a synthesis of the two perspectives, I attempt to discern the elements in each which can help us experience better lives and be more effective political activists. Buddhism identifies those understandings and practices which lead to greater happiness and less suffering in response to existential challenges that we all must face as mortal human beings, (...)
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  36.  5
    Sharon Todd (2015). Experiencing Change, Encountering the Unknown: An Education in ‘Negative Capability’ in Light of Buddhism and Levinas. Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (2):240-254.
    This article offers a reading of the philosophies of Emmanuel Levinas and Theravada Buddhism across and through their differences in order to rethink an education that is committed to ‘negative capability’ and the sensibility to uncertainty that this entails. In fleshing this out, I first explore Buddhist ideas of impermanence, suffering and non-self, known as the three marks of existence, from the perspective of Theravada Buddhism. I explore in particular vipassana meditation's insistence on openness to the transient (...)
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  37.  80
    Patricia Sharp (2011). Buddhist Enlightenment and the Destruction of Attractor Networks: A Neuroscientific Speculation on the Buddhist Path From Everyday Consciousness to Buddha-Awakening. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (3-4):3-4.
    Buddhist philosophy asserts that human suffering is caused by ignorance regarding the true nature of reality. According to this, perceptions and thoughts are largely fabrications of our own minds, based on conditioned tendencies which often involve problematic fears, aversions, compulsions, etc. In Buddhist psychology, these tendencies reside in a portion of mind known as Store consciousness. Here, I suggest a correspondence between this Buddhist Store consciousness and the neuroscientific idea of stored synaptic weights. These weights are strong synaptic connections (...)
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  38.  11
    Sebastian Gäb (2015). Why Do We Suffer? Buddhism and the Problem of Evil. Philosophy Compass 10 (5):345-353.
    This paper explains the Buddhist concept of suffering and its relation to the Christian problem of evil. Although there is no problem of evil in Buddhism, the Buddhist understanding of the origin and causes of suffering will help us to find new approaches to the problem of evil. More specifically, I argue that the concept of evil can be interpreted in terms of dukkha; that the existence of suffering or dukkha is necessarily inevitable for finite beings, (...)
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  39.  37
    Christian Lindtner (1999). From Brahmanism to Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 9 (1):5 – 37.
    It is argued that early Buddhism to a very considerable extent can and should be seen as reformed Brahmanism. Speculations about cosmogony in Buddhist s tras can be traced back to Vedic sources, above all R gveda 10.129 & 10.90—two hymns that play a similar fundamental role in the early Upanisads. Like the immortal and unmanifest Brahman and the mortal and manifest Brahm, the Buddha, as a mythological Bhagavat, also had two forms. In his highest form he is “the (...)
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  40.  32
    David Burton (2002). Knowledge and Liberation: Philosophical Ruminations on a Buddhist Conundrum. Philosophy East and West 52 (3):326-345.
    A philosophical analysis is offered of the relationship between knowledge and liberation in Buddhism. Buddhists often consider the knowledge of impermanence as a key to liberation from craving, attachment, and hence suffering. However, it can be objected that one may know that things are impermanent and yet still be subject to craving and attachment. In the face of this objection, critical consideration is given to five ways in which one might preserve the claim that a knowledge of things (...)
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  41. Vincent Shen (1996). Consciousness and salvation - the conversation between Buddhism and Christianity. Philosophy and Culture 24 (1):2-19.
    In the end of the century atmosphere in which the whole world is entering the valley of nihilism. It seems from a human dilemma, Buddhist and Christian spiritual resources should be jointly developed through conversation, contribute their ideas, values ​​and practices, to promote recovery of people's lives meaning. This article deals Christianity and Buddhism way of talking, is to use my "comparative philosophy." This is a basic way of thinking and practice, must be differences in the surface or the (...)
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  42. Bruce R. Reichenbach (1990). The Law of Karma a Philosophical Study. Macmillan Press and University of Hawaii Press.
    The book examines what advocates of the law of karma mean by the doctrine, various ways they interpret it, and how they see it operating. The study investigates and critically evaluates the law of karma's connections to significant philosophical concepts like causation, freedom, God, persons, the moral law, liberation, and immortality. For example, it explores in depth the implications of the doctrine for whether we are free or fatalistically determined, whether human suffering can be reconciled with cosmic justice, the (...)
     
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  43.  8
    Debika Saha (2008). Early Buddhist Thought and Post-Modernism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:237-244.
    Buddhism traces its origin to the teachings of the historical figure of Gautama, the Buddha. Buddhist system addresses perennial human concerns and articulates profound insights into human nature and thus provides a practical context against the back ground of which it is possible to unravel the meaning of lives. Different branches of this school developed various scriptural traditions. Among them early Buddhist thought branched out into diversity of orders, schools of thought and teaching lineages. Wisdom and compassion are the (...)
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  44.  8
    Lucinda Peach (2008). Buddhist Perspectives on Positive Peace. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:585-591.
    The so-called “war on terror” launched by the United States following 9/11 is only the latest in an ongoing strategy of responding to conflict around the world with military violence and armed force. These interventions appear to be premised on a belief that there is no alternative to using violence and armed force to resolve conflicts because human beings have fixed and unchanging identities which are either “with us or against us,” “friends or enemies,” “good or evil.” In contrast, despite (...)
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  45.  20
    Deane Curtin (1996). A State of Mind Like Water: Ecosophy T and the Buddhist Traditions. Inquiry 39 (2):239 – 253.
    Arne Naess has come under many influences, most notably Gandhi and Spinoza. The Buddhist influence on his work, though less pervasive, provides the most direct account of key deep ecological concepts such as Self?realization and intrinsic value. I read Ecosophy T as a rigorously phenomenological branch of Deep Ecology. like early Buddhism, Naess responds to the human suffering that causes environmental destruction by challenging us to return to the reality of lived experience. This Buddhist reading clarifies, but it (...)
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  46.  6
    Toji Kamata (2008). A Study of Relationship Between Shinto and Japanese Buddhism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:113-118.
    In complete distinction to the world or universal religions like Christianity and Buddhism, Shinto is an ethnic religion that has grown out of the history and culture of the Japanese people. Shinto is a way of prayer and festivals that arose from a feeling of awe and reverence towards those entities the Japanese feared and respected as "KAMA (gods, divinities)", whereas Buddhism is a system of belief and practice leading to realization and the attainment of Buddhahood. We can (...)
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  47.  15
    R. K. Payne (1987). The Theory of Meaning in Buddhist Logicians: The Historical and Intellectual Context of Apoha. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (3):261-284.
    These supporting concepts enable us to much more adequately understand the meaning of apoha. First, a sharp distinction is drawn between the real and the conceptual; the real is particular, unique, momentary and the basis of perception, while the conceptual is universal, general, only supposedly objective and the basis of language. Second, the complex nature of negation discloses the kind of negation meant by apoha. Negation by implication is seen as disclosing the necessary relation between simple affirmations and simple negations. (...)
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  48.  7
    Simon P. James (2006). Buddhism and the Ethics of Species Conservation. Environmental Values 15 (1):85 - 97.
    Efforts to conserve endangered species of animal are, in some important respects, at odds with Buddhist ethics. On the one hand, being abstract entities, species cannot suffer, and so cannot be proper objects of compassion or similar moral virtues. On the other, Buddhist commitments to equanimity tend to militate against the idea that the individual members of endangered species have greater value than those of less-threatened ones. This paper suggests that the contribution of Buddhism to the issue of species (...)
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  49.  14
    David F. Burton (2002). Knowledge and Liberation: Philosophical Ruminations on a Buddhist Conundrum. Philosophy East and West 52 (3):326 - 345.
    A philosophical analysis is offered of the relationship between knowledge and liberation in Buddhism. Buddhists often consider the knowledge of impermanence as a key to liberation from craving, attachment, and hence suffering. However, it can be objected that one may know that things are impermanent and yet still be subject to craving and attachment. In the face of this objection, critical consideration is given to five ways in which one might preserve the claim that a knowledge of things (...)
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  50.  14
    David Burton (2010). Curing Diseases of Belief and Desire: Buddhist Philosophical Therapy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (66):187-.
    It seems uncontroversial that Buddhism is therapeutic in intent. The word ‘therapy’ is often used, however, to denote methods of treating medically defined mental illnesses, while in the Buddhist context it refers to the treatment of deep-seated dissatisfaction and confusion that, it is claimed, afflict us all. The Buddha is likened to a doctor who offers a medicine to cure the spiritual ills of the suffering world. In the Pāli scriptures, one of the epithets of the Buddha is (...)
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