Search results for 'Suggestibility' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  4
    H. J. Eysenck & W. D. Furneaux (1945). Primary and Secondary Suggestibility: An Experimental and Statistical Study. Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (6):485.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  15
    Zoltán Dienes, Elizabeth Brown, Sam Hutton, Irving Kirsch, Giuliana Mazzoni & Daniel B. Wright (2009). Hypnotic Suggestibility, Cognitive Inhibition, and Dissociation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):837-847.
    We examined two potential correlates of hypnotic suggestibility: dissociation and cognitive inhibition. Dissociation is the foundation of two of the major theories of hypnosis and other theories commonly postulate that hypnotic responding is a result of attentional abilities . Participants were administered the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C. Under the guise of an unrelated study, 180 of these participants also completed: a version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that is normally distributed in non-clinical populations; a latent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  3.  9
    Devin Blair Terhune, Etzel Cardeña & Magnus Lindgren (2011). Dissociated Control as a Signature of Typological Variability in High Hypnotic Suggestibility. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):727-736.
    This study tested the prediction that dissociative tendencies modulate the impact of a hypnotic induction on cognitive control in different subtypes of highly suggestible individuals. Low suggestible , low dissociative highly suggestible , and high dissociative highly suggestible participants completed the Stroop color-naming task in control and hypnosis conditions. The magnitude of conflict adaptation was used as a measure of cognitive control. LS and LDHS participants displayed marginally superior up-regulation of cognitive control following a hypnotic induction, whereas HDHS participants’ performance (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  4.  3
    Benjamin A. Parris & Zoltan Dienes (2013). Hypnotic Suggestibility Predicts the Magnitude of the Imaginative Word Blindness Suggestion Effect in a Non-Hypnotic Context. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):868-874.
    The present study investigated how the magnitude the word blindness suggestion effect on Stroop interference depended on hypnotic suggestibility when given as an imaginative suggestion and under conditions in which hypnosis was not mentioned. Hypnotic suggestibility is shown to be a significant predictor of the magnitude of the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect under these conditions. This is therefore the first study to show a linear relationship between the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect and hypnotic suggestibility across (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  4
    Irving Kirsch (2011). Suggestibility and Suggestive Modulation of the Stroop Effect. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):335-336.
    Although the induction of a hypnotic state does not seem necessary for suggestive modulation of the Stroop effect, this important phenomenon has seemed to be dependent on the subject’s level of hypnotic suggestibility. Raz and Campbell’s study indicates that suggestion can modulate the Stroop effect substantially in very low suggestible subjects, as well as in those who are highly suggestible. This finding casts doubt on the presumed mechanism by which suggestive modulation is brought about. Research aimed at uncovering the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  9
    Sean M. Barnes, Steven Jay Lynn & Ronald J. Pekala (2009). Not All Group Hypnotic Suggestibility Scales Are Created Equal: Individual Differences in Behavioral and Subjective Responses☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):255-265.
    To examine the influence of hypnotic suggestibility testing as a source of individual differences in hypnotic responsiveness, we compared behavioral and subjective responses on three scales of hypnotic suggestibility: The Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A . Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility. Berlin: Consulting Psychologists Press); the Carleton University Responsiveness to Suggestion Scale . The Carleton University Responsiveness to Suggestion Scale: Normative data and psychometric properties. Psychological Reports, 53, 523–535); and the Group Scale of Hypnotic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  1
    V. U. Ludwig, C. Stelzel, H. Krutiak, C. E. Prunkl, R. Steimke, L. M. Paschke, N. Kathmann & H. Walter (2013). Impulsivity, Self-Control, and Hypnotic Suggestibility. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):637-653.
    Hypnotic responding might be due to attenuated frontal lobe functioning after the hypnotic induction. Little is known about whether personality traits linked with frontal functioning are associated with responsiveness to hypnotic suggestions. We assessed whether hypnotic suggestibility is related to the traits of self-control and impulsivity in 154 participants who completed the Brief Self-Control Scale, the Self-Regulation Scale, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale , and the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility . BIS-11 non-planning impulsivity correlated positively with HGSHS:A . (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  7
    O. Fassler, S. Lynn & J. Knox (2008). Is Hypnotic Suggestibility a Stable Trait?☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):240-253.
    The present study examined the trait-like nature of hypnotic suggestibility by examining the stability of hypnotic responsiveness in a test–retest design in which the procedures were administered either live or by audiotape. Contrary to the idea that hypnotizability is a largely immutable, stable trait, scores on the scale of hypnotic responsiveness decreased significantly at the second session. Measures of subjective experiences and expectancies accounted for a sizable portion of the variance in hypnotic responding, both at initial test and at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  0
    Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger (2011). The Influence of Suggestibility on Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):399-400.
    We provide a translation of Binet and Henri’s pioneering 1894 paper on the influence of suggestibility on memory. Alfred Binet is famous as the author who created the IQ test that bears his name, but he is almost unknown as the psychological investigator who generated numerous original experiments and fascinating results in the study of memory. His experiments published in 1894 manipulated suggestibility in several ways to determine effects on remembering. Three particular modes of suggestion were employed to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  52
    Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger Iii (2011). The Influence of Suggestibility on Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):399-400.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  3
    Reed Maxwell, Steven Jay Lynn & Liam Condon (2015). Hypnosis, Hypnotic Suggestibility, Memory, and Involvement in Films. Consciousness and Cognition 33:170-184.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    D. Stephen Lindsay & Marcia K. Johnson (1989). The Reversed Eyewitness Suggestibility Effect. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (2):111-113.
  13.  4
    F. Cioffi (1986). Did Freud Rely on the Tally Argument to Meet the Argument From Suggestibility? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (2):230.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  2
    William E. Edmonston (1986). Hypnosis and Social Suggestibility. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):470.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    Mark Blagrove (1996). Effects of Length of Sleep Deprivation on Interrogative Suggestibility. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 2 (1):48.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  1
    Q. Chrobak & Maria S. Zaragoza (2009). The Cognitive Consequences of Forced Fabrication: Evidence From Studies of Eyewitness Suggestibility. In William Hirstein (ed.), Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. OUP Oxford 67--90.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. K. Delamothe & J. E. Taplin (1992). The Effect of Suggestibility on Childrens Recognition Memory. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):449-449.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  0
    Peter A. Newcombe & Michael Siegal (1996). Where to Look First for Suggestibility in Young Children. Cognition 59 (3):337-356.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  0
    Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger (2011). Natural Suggestibility in Children. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):394-398.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger Iii (2011). Natural Suggestibility in Children. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):394-398.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  0
    Devin Blair Terhune (2015). Discrete Response Patterns in the Upper Range of Hypnotic Suggestibility: A Latent Profile Analysis. Consciousness and Cognition 33:334-341.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Quin M. Chrobak & Zaragoza & S. Maria (2009). The Cognitive Consequences of Forces Confabulation: Evidence From Studies of Eyewitness Suggestibility. In William Hirstein (ed.), Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. OUP Oxford
  23.  5
    Michael Lifshitz, Catherine Howells & Amir Raz (2012). Can Expectation Enhance Response to Suggestion? De-Automatization Illuminates a Conundrum. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1001-1008.
    Disparate theoretical viewpoints construe hypnotic suggestibility either as a stable trait, largely determined by underlying cognitive aptitude, or as a flexible skill amenable to attitudinal factors including beliefs and expectations. Circumscribed findings support both views. The present study attempted to consolidate these orthogonal perspectives through the lens of expectancy modification. We surreptitiously controlled light and sound stimuli to convince participants that they were responding strongly to hypnotic suggestions for visual and auditory hallucinations. Extending our previous findings, we indexed hypnotic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  6
    Kathy Pezdek & Chantal Roe (1994). Memory for Childhood Events: How Suggestible Is It? Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):374-387.
    The veracity of children′s memory is frequently doubted because it is assumed that first, children′s memory is generally not very good, and second, children and their memories are too vulnerable to suggestibility to be credible. In this article these two assumptions are evaluated and three experiments are presented that address constraints on the construct of suggestibility. In the first experiment, it is reported that memory for a more frequently occurring event is more resistant to suggestibility than is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  6
    William Brown (1931). Hypnotism and Suggestion. Philosophy 6 (22):212 - 220.
    In any consideration of the nature of suggestion we cannot omit reference to the extraordinary and startling phenomena which may sometimes be observed in hypnotized subjects. But it would be a mistake to look upon hypnosis as something uncanny, mysterious, and occult. Although we have even yet no thoroughly satisfactory theory of hypnosis, we understand it in general terms, and can bring it into line with other facts and phenomena of psychology known in everyday life. The hypnotic subject, and the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  34
    Richard A. Bryant & David Mallard (2003). Seeing is Believing: The Reality of Hypnotic Hallucinations. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):219-230.
    Two experiments investigated the reality attributed to hypnotic suggestion through subtle projection of a visual image during simultaneous suggestion for a visual hallucination that resembled the projected image. In Experiment 1, high and low hypnotizable participants were administered either a hypnotic induction or wake instructions, given a suggestion to hallucinate a shape, and then the projected image was subsequently introduced. Although highs in both conditions rated the projected image more vividly than lows, highs in the hypnosis condition made comparable reality (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  35
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Cortex Functional Connectivity as a Neurophysiological Correlate of Hypnosis: An EEG Case Study. Neuropsychologia 45 (7):14521462.
    Cortex functional connectivity associated with hypnosis was investigated in a single highly hypnotizable subject in a normal baseline condition and under neutral hypnosis during two sessions separated by a year. After the hypnotic induction, but without further suggestions as compared to the baseline condition, all studied parameters of local and remote functional connectivity were significantly changed. The significant differences between hypnosis and the baseline condition were observable (to different extent) in five studied independent frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  2
    N. G. Hanawalt & I. H. Demarest (1939). The Effect of Verbal Suggestion in the Recall Period Upon the Reproduction of Visually Perceived Forms. Journal of Experimental Psychology 25 (2):159.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  2
    Everett F. Patten, St Clair A. Switzer & Clark L. Hull (1932). Habituation, Retention, and Perseveration Characteristics of Direct Waking Suggestion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (5):539.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  2
    C. L. Hull & M. C. Forster (1932). Habituation and Perseverational Characteristics of Two Forms of Indirect Suggestion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (6):700.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Harold Grier McCurdy (1948). An Experimental Study of Waking Postural Suggestion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (3):250.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  1
    A. Jenness (1933). Facilitation of Response to Suggestion by Response to Previous Suggestion of a Different Type. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (1):55.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  1
    E. R. Kellogg (1929). Duration of the Effects of Post-Hypnotic Suggestion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (6):502.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  0
    Roy M. Dorcus (1925). Effect of Suggestion and Tobacco on Pulse Rate and Blood Pressure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 8 (4):297.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  0
    V. E. Fisher (1932). Hypnotic Suggestion and the Conditioned Reflex. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (2):212.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  0
    W. W. Grings, Sidney Carlin & Mortimer H. Appley (1962). Set, Suggestion, and Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (5):417.
  37. Ari Ollinheimo (1999). Metapsychology and the Suggestion Argument: A Reply to Grünbaum's Critique of Psychoanalysis. Finnish Academy of Science and Letters.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  30
    Scott J. Vitell (2003). Consumer Ethics Research: Review, Synthesis and Suggestions for the Future. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):33 - 47.
    This manuscript reviews and synthesizes most of the major research studies in the area of consumer ethics that have appeared since 1990. It examines both conceptual and empirical works with an objective of encouraging researchers to pursue research in the consumer ethics area. Toward this end, the paper also suggests directions for future research.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  39.  7
    Amir Raz & Natasha K. J. Campbell (2011). Can Suggestion Obviate Reading? Supplementing Primary Stroop Evidence with Exploratory Negative Priming Analyses. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):312-320.
    Using the Stroop paradigm, we have previously shown that a specific suggestion can remove or reduce involuntary conflict and alter information processing in highly suggestible individuals . In the present study, we carefully matched less suggestible individuals to HSIs on a number of factors. We hypothesized that suggestion would influence HSIs more than LSIs and reduce the Stroop effect in the former group. As well, we conducted secondary post hoc analyses to examine negative priming – the apparent disruption of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  40.  2
    William J. McGeown, Annalena Venneri, Irving Kirsch, Luca Nocetti, Kathrine Roberts, Lisa Foan & Giuliana Mazzoni (2012). Suggested Visual Hallucination Without Hypnosis Enhances Activity in Visual Areas of the Brain. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):100-116.
    This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study investigated high and low suggestible people responding to two visual hallucination suggestions with and without a hypnotic induction. Participants in the study were asked to see color while looking at a grey image, and to see shades of grey while looking at a color image. High suggestible participants reported successful alterations in color perception in both tasks, both in and out of hypnosis, and showed a small benefit if hypnosis was induced. Low suggestible people (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  41.  17
    A. RAz, M. Morenoiniguez, L. Martin & H. ZHu (2007). Suggestion Overrides the Stroop Effect in Highly Hypnotizable Individuals. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):331-338.
    Cognitive scientists distinguish between automatic and controlled mental processes. Automatic processes are either innately involuntary or become automatized through extensive practice. For example, reading words is a purportedly automatic process for proficient readers and the Stroop effect is consequently considered the “gold standard” of automated performance. Although the question of whether it is possible to regain control over an automatic process is mostly unasked, we provide compelling data showing that posthypnotic suggestion reduced and even removed Stroop interference in highly hypnotizable (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  42.  36
    Jennifer M. Windt & Valdas Noreika (2011). How to Integrate Dreaming Into a General Theory of Consciousness—A Critical Review of Existing Positions and Suggestions for Future Research. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1091-1107.
    In this paper, we address the different ways in which dream research can contribute to interdisciplinary consciousness research. As a second global state of consciousness aside from wakefulness, dreaming is an important contrast condition for theories of waking consciousness. However, programmatic suggestions for integrating dreaming into broader theories of consciousness, for instance by regarding dreams as a model system of standard or pathological wake states, have not yielded straightforward results. We review existing proposals for using dreaming as a model system, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  95
    Mara Miller (2013). Terrible Knowledge And Tertiary Trauma, Part II: Suggestions for Teaching About the Atomic Bombings, with Particular Attention to Middle School. The Clearing House 86 (05):164-173.
    In a companion article, “Terrible Knowledge And Tertiary Trauma, Part I: Japanese Nuclear Trauma And Resistance To The Atomic Bomb” (this issue), I argue that we need to teach about the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, even though the material is difficult emotionally as well as intellectually. Because of the nature of the information, this topic can be as difficult for graduate students (and their professors!) as for younger students. Teaching about the atomic bombings, however, demands special treatment if (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  3
    Jonathan Baron (2011). Utilitarian Emotions: Suggestions From Introspection. Emotion Review 3 (3):286-286.
    In folk psychology and some academic psychology, utilitarian thinking is associated with coldness and deontological thinking is associated with emotion. I suggest, mostly through personal examples, that these associations are far from perfect. Utilitarians experience emotions, which sometimes derive from, and sometimes cause or reinforce, their moral judgments.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45.  6
    Giuliana Mazzoni, Elisabetta Rotriquenz, Claudia Carvalho, Manila Vannucci, Kathrine Roberts & Irving Kirsch (2009). Suggested Visual Hallucinations in and Out of Hypnosis. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):494-499.
    We administered suggestions to see a gray-scale pattern as colored and a colored pattern in shades of gray to 30 high suggestible and eight low suggestible students. The suggestions were administered twice, once following the induction of hypnosis and once without an induction. Besides rating the degree of color they saw in the stimuli differently, participants also rated their states of consciousness as normal, relaxed, hypnotized, or deeply hypnotized. Reports of being hypnotized were limited to highly suggestible participants and only (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  46.  6
    A. Raz, S. K., R. H., R. Z., T. Shapiro, J. Fan & I. M. (2003). Posthypnotic Suggestion and the Modulation of Stroop Interference Under Cycloplegia. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):332-346.
    Recent data indicate that under a specific posthypnotic suggestion to circumvent reading, highly suggestible subjects successfully eliminated the Stroop interference effect. The present study examined whether an optical explanation (e.g., visual blurring or looking away) could account for this finding. Using cyclopentolate hydrochloride eye drops to pharmacologically prevent visual accommodation in all subjects, behavioral Stroop data were collected from six highly hypnotizables and six less suggestibles using an optical setup that guaranteed either sharply (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  47.  6
    Martin Montminy (2012). Epistemic Modals and Indirect Weak Suggestives. Dialectica 66 (4):583-606.
    I defend a contextualist account of bare epistemic modal claims against recent objections. I argue that in uttering a sentence of the form ‘It might be that p,’ a speaker is performing two speech acts. First, she is (directly) asserting that in view of the knowledge possessed by some relevant group, it might be that p. The content of this first speech act is accounted for by the contextualist view. But the speaker's utterance also generates an indirect speech act that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  3
    Martin Lipscomb (2006). Rebutting the Suggestion That Anthony Giddens's Structuration Theory Offers a Useful Framework for Sociological Nursing Research: A Critique Based Upon Margaret Archer's Realist Social Theory. Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):175-180.
    A recent paper in this journal by Hardcastle et al. in 2005 argued that Anthony Giddens’s Structuration Theory might usefully inform sociological nursing research. In response, a critique of ST based upon the Realist Social Theory of Margaret Archer is presented. Archer maintains that ST is fatally flawed and, in consequence, it has little to offer nursing research. Following an analysis of the concepts epiphenomenalism and elisionism, it is suggested that emergentist Realist Social Theory captures or describes a more coherent (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  49.  23
    Evan Selinger, Jesús Aguilar & Kyle Powys Whyte (2011). Action Schemes: Questions and Suggestions. Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):83-88.
    Action Schemes: Questions and Suggestions Content Type Journal Article Pages 83-88 DOI 10.1007/s13347-010-0007-2 Authors Evan Selinger, Department of Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY USA Jesús Aguilar, Department of Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY USA Kyle Powys Whyte, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI USA Journal Philosophy & Technology Online ISSN 2210-5441 Print ISSN 2210-5433 Journal Volume Volume 24 Journal Issue Volume 24, Number 1.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  5
    Leo C. Brown (1927). Suggestion and Its Causes. Modern Schoolman 3 (8):129-130.
    The timliness of an investigation into the phenomena of suggestion today can hardly be over estimated. With each succeeding advance it is being given more importance in advertising, in education, and in heath. The author has made it the subject of his master's thesis. Here we have the kernel of his months of thought. The Editor.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000