Search results for 'Suggestibility' (try it on Scholar)

51 found
Order:
  1.  7
    H. J. Eysenck & W. D. Furneaux (1945). Primary and Secondary Suggestibility: An Experimental and Statistical Study. Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (6):485.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  34
    Zoltán Dienes, Elizabeth Brown, Sam Hutton, Irving Kirsch, Giuliana Mazzoni & Daniel B. Wright (2009). Hypnotic Suggestibility, Cognitive Inhibition, and Dissociation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):837-847.
    We examined two potential correlates of hypnotic suggestibility: dissociation and cognitive inhibition. Dissociation is the foundation of two of the major theories of hypnosis and other theories commonly postulate that hypnotic responding is a result of attentional abilities . Participants were administered the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C. Under the guise of an unrelated study, 180 of these participants also completed: a version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that is normally distributed in non-clinical populations; a latent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  3.  9
    Devin Blair Terhune, Etzel Cardeña & Magnus Lindgren (2011). Dissociated Control as a Signature of Typological Variability in High Hypnotic Suggestibility. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):727-736.
    This study tested the prediction that dissociative tendencies modulate the impact of a hypnotic induction on cognitive control in different subtypes of highly suggestible individuals. Low suggestible , low dissociative highly suggestible , and high dissociative highly suggestible participants completed the Stroop color-naming task in control and hypnosis conditions. The magnitude of conflict adaptation was used as a measure of cognitive control. LS and LDHS participants displayed marginally superior up-regulation of cognitive control following a hypnotic induction, whereas HDHS participants’ performance (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  4.  20
    Benjamin A. Parris & Zoltan Dienes (2013). Hypnotic Suggestibility Predicts the Magnitude of the Imaginative Word Blindness Suggestion Effect in a Non-Hypnotic Context. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):868-874.
    The present study investigated how the magnitude the word blindness suggestion effect on Stroop interference depended on hypnotic suggestibility when given as an imaginative suggestion and under conditions in which hypnosis was not mentioned. Hypnotic suggestibility is shown to be a significant predictor of the magnitude of the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect under these conditions. This is therefore the first study to show a linear relationship between the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect and hypnotic suggestibility across (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5.  4
    Irving Kirsch (2011). Suggestibility and Suggestive Modulation of the Stroop Effect. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):335-336.
    Although the induction of a hypnotic state does not seem necessary for suggestive modulation of the Stroop effect, this important phenomenon has seemed to be dependent on the subject’s level of hypnotic suggestibility. Raz and Campbell’s study indicates that suggestion can modulate the Stroop effect substantially in very low suggestible subjects, as well as in those who are highly suggestible. This finding casts doubt on the presumed mechanism by which suggestive modulation is brought about. Research aimed at uncovering the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  1
    V. U. Ludwig, C. Stelzel, H. Krutiak, C. E. Prunkl, R. Steimke, L. M. Paschke, N. Kathmann & H. Walter (2013). Impulsivity, Self-Control, and Hypnotic Suggestibility. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):637-653.
    Hypnotic responding might be due to attenuated frontal lobe functioning after the hypnotic induction. Little is known about whether personality traits linked with frontal functioning are associated with responsiveness to hypnotic suggestions. We assessed whether hypnotic suggestibility is related to the traits of self-control and impulsivity in 154 participants who completed the Brief Self-Control Scale, the Self-Regulation Scale, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale , and the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility . BIS-11 non-planning impulsivity correlated positively with HGSHS:A . (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  14
    Sean M. Barnes, Steven Jay Lynn & Ronald J. Pekala (2009). Not All Group Hypnotic Suggestibility Scales Are Created Equal: Individual Differences in Behavioral and Subjective Responses☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):255-265.
    To examine the influence of hypnotic suggestibility testing as a source of individual differences in hypnotic responsiveness, we compared behavioral and subjective responses on three scales of hypnotic suggestibility: The Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A . Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility. Berlin: Consulting Psychologists Press); the Carleton University Responsiveness to Suggestion Scale . The Carleton University Responsiveness to Suggestion Scale: Normative data and psychometric properties. Psychological Reports, 53, 523–535); and the Group Scale of Hypnotic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  9
    O. Fassler, S. Lynn & J. Knox (2008). Is Hypnotic Suggestibility a Stable Trait?☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):240-253.
    The present study examined the trait-like nature of hypnotic suggestibility by examining the stability of hypnotic responsiveness in a test–retest design in which the procedures were administered either live or by audiotape. Contrary to the idea that hypnotizability is a largely immutable, stable trait, scores on the scale of hypnotic responsiveness decreased significantly at the second session. Measures of subjective experiences and expectancies accounted for a sizable portion of the variance in hypnotic responding, both at initial test and at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger (2011). The Influence of Suggestibility on Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):399-400.
    We provide a translation of Binet and Henri’s pioneering 1894 paper on the influence of suggestibility on memory. Alfred Binet is famous as the author who created the IQ test that bears his name, but he is almost unknown as the psychological investigator who generated numerous original experiments and fascinating results in the study of memory. His experiments published in 1894 manipulated suggestibility in several ways to determine effects on remembering. Three particular modes of suggestion were employed to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger Iii (2011). The Influence of Suggestibility on Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):399-400.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Devin Blair Terhune (2015). Discrete Response Patterns in the Upper Range of Hypnotic Suggestibility: A Latent Profile Analysis. Consciousness and Cognition 33:334-341.
  12. Jo Saunders & Malcolm D. MacLeod (2002). New Evidence on the Suggestibility of Memory: The Role of Retrieval-Induced Forgetting in Misinformation Effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 8 (2):127-142.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  3
    Mark Blagrove (1996). Effects of Length of Sleep Deprivation on Interrogative Suggestibility. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 2 (1):48.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  1
    D. Stephen Lindsay & Marcia K. Johnson (1989). The Reversed Eyewitness Suggestibility Effect. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (2):111-113.
  15. K. Delamothe & J. E. Taplin (1992). The Effect of Suggestibility on Childrens Recognition Memory. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):449-449.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Stephen J. Ceci, David F. Ross & Michael P. Toglia (1987). Suggestibility of Children's Memory: Psycholegal Implications. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (1):38-49.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  1
    C. J. Brainerd & V. F. Reyna (1988). Memory Loci of Suggestibility Development: Comment on Ceci, Ross, and Toglia. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (2):197-200.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Stephen J. Ceci, Michael P. Toglia & David F. Ross (1988). On Remembering… More or Less: A Trace Strength Interpretation of Developmental Differences in Suggestibility. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (2):201-203.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  5
    F. Cioffi (1986). Did Freud Rely on the Tally Argument to Meet the Argument From Suggestibility? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (2):230.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  3
    Reed Maxwell, Steven Jay Lynn & Liam Condon (2015). Hypnosis, Hypnotic Suggestibility, Memory, and Involvement in Films. Consciousness and Cognition 33:170-184.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  3
    William E. Edmonston (1986). Hypnosis and Social Suggestibility. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):470.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  1
    Q. Chrobak & Maria S. Zaragoza (2009). The Cognitive Consequences of Forced Fabrication: Evidence From Studies of Eyewitness Suggestibility. In William Hirstein (ed.), Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. OUP Oxford 67--90.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Jason C. K. Chan & Jessica A. LaPaglia (2011). The Dark Side of Testing Memory: Repeated Retrieval Can Enhance Eyewitness Suggestibility. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 17 (4):418-432.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Robert A. Cummins (1914). A Study of the Effect of Basket Ball Practice on Motor Reaction, Attention and Suggestibility. Psychological Review 21 (5):356-369.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Livia L. Gilstrap (2004). A Missing Link in Suggestibility Research: What Is Known About the Behavior of Field Interviewers in Unstructured Interviews With Young Children? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 10 (1):13-24.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. J. J. B. Morgan (1924). The Nature of Suggestibility. Psychological Review 31 (6):463-477.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Peter A. Newcombe & Michael Siegal (1996). Where to Look First for Suggestibility in Young Children. Cognition 59 (3):337-356.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger (2011). Natural Suggestibility in Children. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):394-398.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Serge Nicolas, Thérèse Collins, Yannick Gounden & Henry L. Roediger Iii (2011). Natural Suggestibility in Children. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):394-398.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Walter D. Scott (1910). Personal Differences in Suggestibility. Psychological Review 17 (2):147-154.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Matthew H. Scullin, Tomoe Kanaya & Stephen J. Ceci (2002). Measurement of Individual Differences in Children's Suggestibility Across Situations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 8 (4):233-246.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Miko M. Wilford, Jason C. K. Chan & Sam J. Tuhn (2014). Retrieval Enhances Eyewitness Suggestibility to Misinformation in Free and Cued Recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 20 (1):81-93.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Quin M. Chrobak & Zaragoza & S. Maria (2009). The Cognitive Consequences of Forces Confabulation: Evidence From Studies of Eyewitness Suggestibility. In William Hirstein (ed.), Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. OUP Oxford
  34.  39
    Richard A. Bryant & David Mallard (2003). Seeing is Believing: The Reality of Hypnotic Hallucinations. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):219-230.
    Two experiments investigated the reality attributed to hypnotic suggestion through subtle projection of a visual image during simultaneous suggestion for a visual hallucination that resembled the projected image. In Experiment 1, high and low hypnotizable participants were administered either a hypnotic induction or wake instructions, given a suggestion to hallucinate a shape, and then the projected image was subsequently introduced. Although highs in both conditions rated the projected image more vividly than lows, highs in the hypnosis condition made comparable reality (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  35. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 145-165.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  49
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Cortex Functional Connectivity as a Neurophysiological Correlate of Hypnosis: An EEG Case Study. Neuropsychologia 45 (7):14521462.
    Cortex functional connectivity associated with hypnosis was investigated in a single highly hypnotizable subject in a normal baseline condition and under neutral hypnosis during two sessions separated by a year. After the hypnotic induction, but without further suggestions as compared to the baseline condition, all studied parameters of local and remote functional connectivity were significantly changed. The significant differences between hypnosis and the baseline condition were observable (to different extent) in five studied independent frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen (2005). Simulating the Unconscious. Psychoanalysis and History 7 (1):5-20.
  38.  13
    Devin Blair Terhune & Etzel Cardeña (2010). Differential Patterns of Spontaneous Experiential Response to a Hypnotic Induction: A Latent Profile Analysis. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1140-1150.
    A hypnotic induction produces different patterns of spontaneous experiences across individuals. The magnitude and characteristics of these responses covary moderately with hypnotic suggestibility, but also differ within levels of hypnotic suggestibility. This study sought to identify discrete phenomenological profiles in response to a hypnotic induction and assess whether experiential variability among highly suggestible individuals matches the phenomenological profiles predicted by dissociative typological models of high hypnotic suggestibility. Phenomenological state scores indexed in reference to a resting epoch during (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  39.  23
    C. M. MacLeod & P. W. Sheehan (2003). Hypnotic Control of Attention in the Stroop Task: A Historical Footnote. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):347-353.
    have recently provided a compelling demonstration of enhanced attentional control under post-hypnotic suggestion. Using the classic color-word interference paradigm, in which the task is to ignore a word and to name the color in which it is printed (e.g., RED in green, say ''green''), they gave a post-hypnotic instruction to participants that they would be unable to read. This eliminated Stroop interference in high suggestibility participants but did not alter interference in low suggestibility participants. replicated this pattern and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  40.  19
    Michael Lifshitz, Catherine Howells & Amir Raz (2012). Can Expectation Enhance Response to Suggestion? De-Automatization Illuminates a Conundrum. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1001-1008.
    Disparate theoretical viewpoints construe hypnotic suggestibility either as a stable trait, largely determined by underlying cognitive aptitude, or as a flexible skill amenable to attitudinal factors including beliefs and expectations. Circumscribed findings support both views. The present study attempted to consolidate these orthogonal perspectives through the lens of expectancy modification. We surreptitiously controlled light and sound stimuli to convince participants that they were responding strongly to hypnotic suggestions for visual and auditory hallucinations. Extending our previous findings, we indexed hypnotic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  15
    Anne P. DePrince, Carolyn B. Allard, Hannah Oh & Jennifer J. Freyd (2004). What's in a Name for Memory Errors? Implications and Ethical Issues Arising From the Use of the Term "False Memory" for Errors in Memory for Details. Ethics and Behavior 14 (3):201 – 233.
    The term "false memories" has been used to refer to suggestibility experiments in which whole events are apparently confabulated and in media accounts of contested memories of childhood abuse. Since 1992 psychologists have increasingly used the term "false memory" when discussing memory errors for details, such as specific words within word lists. Use of the term to refer to errors in details is a shift in language away from other terms used historically (e.g., "memory intrusions"). We empirically examine this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  12
    Mary Lyn Huffman, Angela M. Crossman & Stephen J. Ceci (1997). “Are False Memories Permanent?”: An Investigation of the Long-Term Effects of Source Misattributions. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (4):482-490.
    With growing concerns over children's suggestibility and how it may impact their reliability as witnesses, there is increasing interest in determining the long-term effects of induced memories. The goal of the present research was to learn whether source misattributions found by Ceci, Huffman, Smith, and Loftus caused permanent memory alterations in the subjects tested. When 22 children from the original study were reinterviewed 2 years later, they recalled 77% of all true events. However, they only consented to 13% of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  43.  30
    Gerald Houghton (1980). A Systems-Tensorial Interpretation of Psychomedical Concepts. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 1 (2):225-247.
    The multidimensional environments providing the stimuli for normal and abnormal human behavior have been characterized by a variety of environmental tensors, the time rates of change of which yield quantitative measures of various aspects of environmental dynamics. A general response tensor is introduced to describe the behavior of living organisms to any desired degree of complexity. Tensor measures of such psychiatric concepts as reactivity, adaptability, responsiveness, instinctiveness and suggestibility are mathematically defined in terms of the response and environment tensors. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  20
    Balaganesh Gandhi & David A. Oakley (2005). Does 'Hypnosis' by Any Other Name Smell as Sweet? The Efficacy of 'Hypnotic' Inductions Depends on the Label 'Hypnosis'. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):304-315.
    Hypnosis is associated with profound changes in conscious experience and is increasingly used as a cognitive tool to explore neuropsychological processes. Studies of this sort typically employ suggestions following a hypnotic induction to produce changes in perceptual experience and motor control. It is not clear, however, to what extent the induction procedure serves to facilitate suggested phenomena. This study investigated the effect on suggestibility of a hypnotic induction and labelling that procedure ‘hypnosis.’ Suggestibility of participants was tested before (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  35
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Stephen Behnke (2000). Responsibility in Cases of Multiple Personality Disorder. Noûs 34 (s14):301-323.
    Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), now also known as Dissociative Iden- tity Disorder, raises many questions about the nature of persons, the goals of treatment, the suggestibility of patients, and the reliability of defendant reports of their own mental states. These issues become crucial when courts need to decide whether or not to punish a person with MPD who has committed a crime. This paper will explore that issue and propose a test of when people with MPD should be held (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  11
    Kathy Pezdek & Chantal Roe (1994). Memory for Childhood Events: How Suggestible Is It? Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):374-387.
    The veracity of children′s memory is frequently doubted because it is assumed that first, children′s memory is generally not very good, and second, children and their memories are too vulnerable to suggestibility to be credible. In this article these two assumptions are evaluated and three experiments are presented that address constraints on the construct of suggestibility. In the first experiment, it is reported that memory for a more frequently occurring event is more resistant to suggestibility than is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  12
    Bernard J. Baars & Katharine McGovern (1995). Steps Toward Healing: False Memories and Traumagenic Amnesia May Coexist in Vulnerable Populations. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):68-74.
    Child abuse is surely the most agonizing psychological issue of our time. We decry the tendency to polarize around the either-or dichotomy of "recovered versus false memories," when both are likely to occur. Memory researchers seem to generalize from the mild, one-shot stressors of the laboratory to the severe repeated traumas reported by abused populations, an inferential leap that is scientifically dubious. Naturalistic studies show some post-traumatic memory impairment ; dissociativity, such as emotional numbing, detachment, and the like; but also (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  10
    William Brown (1931). Hypnotism and Suggestion. Philosophy 6 (22):212 - 220.
    In any consideration of the nature of suggestion we cannot omit reference to the extraordinary and startling phenomena which may sometimes be observed in hypnotized subjects. But it would be a mistake to look upon hypnosis as something uncanny, mysterious, and occult. Although we have even yet no thoroughly satisfactory theory of hypnosis, we understand it in general terms, and can bring it into line with other facts and phenomena of psychology known in everyday life. The hypnotic subject, and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. M. C. & W. P. (2003). Hypnotic Control of Attention in the Stroop Task: A Historical Footnote. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):347-353.
    have recently provided a compelling demonstration of enhanced attentional control under post-hypnotic suggestion. Using the classic color-word interference paradigm, in which the task is to ignore a word and to name the color in which it is printed (e.g., RED in green, say ''green''), they gave a post-hypnotic instruction to participants that they would be unable to read. This eliminated Stroop interference in high suggestibility participants but did not alter interference in low suggestibility participants. replicated this pattern and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  4
    Julia T. O'Sullivan & Mark L. Howe (1995). Metamemory and Memory Construction. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):104-110.
    In this article, we present the contemporary conceptualization of metamemory as beliefs, accurate and naive, about memory. We discuss the implications of metamemory for memory construction in general and for suggestibility and the recovery of memories in particular. We argue that beliefs about memory influence the probability that suggestions will be incorporated into memory and judgements about the veracity of subsequent recollections. Implications for research on the role of beliefs in suggestibility and memory recovery are outlined.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 51