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  1. Sukjae Lee, Leibniz on Spontaneity: A Sketch of Formal and Final Causation.
    According to a standard picture of Leibniz’s mature views on creaturely causation, Leibniz held what some interpreters have described as his ‘thesis of spontaneity’: “every non-initial, nonmiraculous state of every created substance has as a real cause some preceding state of that very substance.”2 Evidence for this thesis is abundantly available throughout Leibniz’s mature work and here are some prominent instances.
     
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  2. Sukjae Lee, Passive Natures and No Representations: Malebranche's Two “Local” Arguments for Occasionalism.
    In the last twenty years or so, the study of early modern philosophy seems to have experienced a revival of interest in Nicolas Malebranche. Some might wonder whether “revival” is the right term but I use it intentionally, since it is hardly the case that we for the first time are uncovering an obscure but talented figure from the bin of neglected, underappreciated philosophers. As one commentator has recently noted, Malebranche was hailed by none other than Pierre Bayle as “the (...)
     
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  3. Sukjae Lee (2014). Toward a New Reading of Leibnizian Appetites: Appetites as Uneasiness. Res Philosophica 91 (1):123-150.
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  4. Sukjae Lee (2013). Malebranche on Necessary Connections, Omniscience, and Omnipotence. In Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.), Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge. 106.
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  5. Sukjae Lee (2012). Berkeley on the Activity of Spirits. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):539-576.
    This paper propounds a new reading of Berkeley's account of the activity of finite spirits. Against existing interpretations, the paper argues that Berkeley does not hold that we causally contribute to the movement of our bodies. In contrast, our volitions to move our bodies are but occasions for God to cause their movement. In answer to the question of wherein then consists our activity, the paper proposes that our activity consists in the dual powers to produce (1) our volitions ? (...)
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  6. Sukjae Lee, Occasionalism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  7. Sukjae Lee (2008). Necessary Connections and Continuous Creation: Malebranche's Two Arguments for Occasionalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):539-565.
    Malebranche presents two major arguments for occasionalism: the “no necessary connection” argument (NNC) and the “conservation is but continuous creation” argument (CCC). NNC appears prominently in his Search After Truth but virtually disappears and surrenders the spotlight to CCC in his later major work, Dialogues on Metaphysics and on Religion . This paper investigates the possible reasons and motivations behind this significant shift. I argue that the shift is no surprise if we consider the two ways in which the CCC (...)
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  8. Sukjae Lee (2007). Passive Natures and No Representations. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 15 (1):72-91.
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  9. Sukjae Lee (2004). Leibniz on Divine Concurrence. Philosophical Review 113 (2):203-248.
    Leibniz was a divine concurrentist. That is to say, when it came to the question of how God’s causal power relates to the natural causal activity of creatures, Leibniz held that both God and the creature are directly involved in the occurrence of these effects.
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  10. Sukjae Lee (1998). Scotus on the Will: The Rational Power and the Dual Affections. Vivarium 36 (1):40-54.
    Sukjae Lee John Duns Scotus believes it to be undeniably true that we human beings have free will. He does not argue for our freedom but rather explains it. There are two elements which are both characteristic of and essential to Scotus’ account of human will: namely, 1) the will as a self-determining power for opposites, thus a ‘rational’ power; and 2) the ‘dual affections of the will.’2 The significance of each element taken separately is comprehensible if not obvious. We (...)
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