Search results for 'Sunyata' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Remanent In Sunyata (1990). Lobsang Dargyay. Journal of Indian Philosophy 18:81-91.
     
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  2.  11
    Seung Chul Kim (2015). Śūnyatā and Kokoro: Science–Religion Dialogue in the Japanese Context. Zygon 50 (1):155-171.
    When we read books or essays about the dialogue between “religion and science,” or when we attend conferences on the theme of “religion and science,” we cannot avoid the impression that they actually are dealing, almost without exception, not with a dialogue between “religion and science,” but with a dialogue between “Christianity and science.” This could easily be affirmed by looking at the major publications in this field. But how can the science–religion dialogue take place in a world where conventional (...)
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  3. Shōhei Ichimura (2001). Buddhist Critical Spirituality: Prajñā and Śūnyatā. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
     
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  4.  6
    Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2015). Kenosis, Dynamic Śūnyatā and Weak Thought: Abe Masao and Gianni Vattimo. Asian Philosophy 25 (4):358-383.
    The verb κενόω means ‘to empty’ and St. Paul uses the word ἐκένωσεν writing that ‘Jesus made himself nothing’ and ‘emptied himself’. Śūnyatā is a Buddhist concept most commonly translated as emptiness, nothingness, or nonsubstantiality. An important kenosis–śūnyatā discussion was sparked by Abe Masao’s paper ‘Kenotic God and Dynamic Śūnyatā’. I confront the kenosis–śūnyatā theme with Vattimo’s kenosis-based philosophy of religion. For Vattimo, kenosis refers to ‘secularization’: when strong structures such as the essence and the fulfilment of the Christian message (...)
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  5.  5
    David Grandy, Sunyata in the West.
    I argue that sunyata, or something like it, manifested itself in early Western thought. While Plato and Aristotle resisted emptiness or nothingness, they nevertheless felt themselves obliged to venture close to its edge in order to ground their explanations of changing reality to unchanging principles. These principles embody much of the indeterminancy long associated with the Mahayana understanding of sunyata. Although their function was to enable lasting explanations of reality by putting change out of play, they themselves shade (...)
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  6.  28
    Mathew Varghese (2008). Discerning the Concept of Śūnyatā as a Procedure for “Remaking of Man”. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:267-273.
    The proposed paper wishes to reflect on the conception of non-self and Shunyta and how these ideas are discerned in the process of remaking of Man as it is understood in the classical Indian philosophy. The concept of non-self is very carefully elaborated in such a way that it could define the unique relationship that thehuman being have with the world of existence where remaking of man is an absolute necessity to transact with the uncertain and indescribable phenomenal world. The (...)
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  7.  2
    Li Yijing (2015). Masao Abe's Dynamic Sunyata and Process Thought. Process Studies 44 (1):120-131.
    This article compares Masao Abe's Buddhist view of ultimate reality in terms of dynamic Sunyata with certain concepts in the process thought of Alfred North Whitehead and John Cobb.
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  8. Glyn Richards (1978). Śūnyatā: Objective Referent or Via Negativa?: Glyn Richards. Religious Studies 14 (2):251-260.
    I propose in this paper to examine and analyse the concept of śūnyatā as it is expressed in the Hrdaya sūtras of the Buddhist prajñā-pāramitā literature and in the Mū1amadhyamaka-kārikās of Nāgārjuna. I shall attempt to show some of the difficulties involved in seeking an objective referent or counter part for the concept and also in trying to preserve the tension implicit in the affirmation of the middle way. I hope to indicate that the via negativa approach has positive implications (...)
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  9.  9
    Alessandro Tomasi (2008). Technology From the Standpoint of Sunyata. Asian Philosophy 18 (3):197 – 212.
    _Keiji Nishitani's critique of technology as a dehumanizing force is objected to by showing that it is possible to establish a relationship with technology characterized by the standpoint of sunyata. In order to support my claim, I offer an interpretation of sunyata as a lived experience in which knowing and being are unified. One method used to experience the identity of knowing and being is the method of negatio negationis. I argue that technology embodies this method, and that (...)
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  10. Fred Dallmayr (1992). Nothingness and Śūnyatā: A Comparison of Heidegger and Nishitani. Philosophy East and West 42 (1):37-48.
  11.  68
    Jay L. Garfield (1990). Epoche and Śūnyatā: Skepticism East and West. Philosophy East and West 40 (3):285-307.
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  12.  14
    Charles Brewer Jones (2005). Emptiness, Kenosis, History, and Dialogue: The Christian Response to Masao Abe's Notion of "Dynamic Sunyata " in the Early Years of the Abe-Cobb Buddhist-Christian Dialogue. Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):117-133.
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  13.  38
    Tom J. F. Tillemans (1984). Two Tibetan Texts on the “Neither One nor Many” Argument for Śūnyatā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 12 (4):357-388.
  14.  15
    Michael G. Barnhart (1994). Śūnyatā, Textualism, and Incommensurability. Philosophy East and West 44 (4):647-658.
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  15.  1
    Susie Paulik Babka (2015). Sunyata and Otherness: Applying Mutually Transformative Categories From Buddhist-Christian Dialogue in Christology. Buddhist-Christian Studies 35 (1):73-90.
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  16. Richard King (1989). "Sunyata and Ajati": Absolutism and the Philosophies of Nagarjuna and Gaudapada. Journal of Indian Philosophy 17 (4):385.
     
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  17.  29
    Guy Bugault (2000). The Immunity of Śūnyatā: Is It Possible to Understand Madhyamakakārikās, 4,8-9? [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 28 (4):385-397.
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  18.  26
    Bhaswati Bhattacharyya (1979). The Concept of Existence and Nāgārjuna's Doctrine of Śūnyatā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 7 (4):335-344.
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  19. Ram Chandra Pandeya (1991). Nāgārjuna's Philosophy of No-Identity: With Philosophical Translations of the Madhyamaka-Kārikā, Śūnyatā-Saptati, and Vigrahavyāvartanī. Eastern Book Linkers.
     
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  20.  10
    Richard King (1989). Śūnyatā and Ajāti: Absolutism and the Philosophies of Nāgārjuna and Gau $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{D}$}}{D} " />Apāda. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 17 (4).
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  21.  7
    Steve Odin (forthcoming). ""A Critique of the" Kenōsis/Śūnyatā" Motif in Nishida and the Kyoto School. Buddhist-Christian Studies.
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  22.  25
    Laura E. Weed (2002). Kant's Noumenon and Sunyata. Asian Philosophy 12 (2):77 – 95.
    This paper compares Kant's positions on space, time, the relational character of noumena, and the relational character of the self, with the somewhat similar accounts of those things in two philosophers of the Kyoto school: Keiji Nishitani and Nishida Kitaro. I will argue that the philosophers of the Kyoto school had a more coherent and better integrated account of those ideas, that was open to Kant. I think that the comparison both clarifies Kant's position on these topics, and elucidates the (...)
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  23.  19
    Lobsang Dargyay (1990). What is Non-Existent and What is Remanent in Sūnyatā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 18 (1):81-91.
    In the various texts the phrase “something does not exist there” was interpreted in the following way: “elephants, cows, etc.” (Cūlasuññata-sutta) “the imagined, or conceptualized” (Yogācāra tradition), “the five skandhas, the elements, the sensory fields as eternal and solid entities” (Abhidharmasamuccaya), “all conventional phenomena” (Dolpo-pa), “inherent reality” (rGyal-tshab-rje), “accidental pollution with regard to the tathāgatagarbha (Gung-thang). The phrase “something that remains there does exist as a real existent” was interpreted also in different ways: “monks, palace, world, etc” (Cūlasuññata-sutta), “the perfect, (...)
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  24.  5
    Thomas Kochumuttom (1981). Sunyata and Tathata: Emptiness and Suchness. Journal of Dharma 6 (1):18-33.
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  25.  4
    M. P. Marathe (1980). Nagarjuna and Candrakirti on Sunyata. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 7 (4):531-540.
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  26.  10
    Fernando Tola & Carmen Dragoneti (1981). Nāgārjuna's Conception of 'Voidness' (Śūnyatā). Journal of Indian Philosophy 9 (3):273-282.
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  27.  4
    Glyn Richards (1978). Śūnyatā: Objective Referent or Via Negativa? Religious Studies 14 (2):251 - 260.
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  28.  1
    Brian Ellwood (2004). The Passage From Virtual Nihility to the Standpoint of Sunyata. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 4 (2 & 3):41-90.
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  29. Suniti Kumar Pathak (2005). AN Appropriate English Lexiconic Equivalent of Sunyata is Not Available Because Each Word Derives its Meaning From its Context. That is Why It is so Difficult to Translate a Word From One Language to Another. Sttnya in English is" Void;" Sunyata Is. In Bettina Baumer & John R. Dupuche (eds.), Void and Fullness in the Buddhist, Hindu, and Christian Traditions: Sunya-Purna-Pleroma. D.K. Printworld
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  30. Gustav Roth (1992). The Positive Dimension of Sunyata in Nagarjuna. In Gustav Roth & H. S. Prasad (eds.), Philosophy, Grammar, and Indology: Essays in Honour of Professor Gustav Roth. Sri Satguru Publications 20--87.
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  31. G. Vedaparayana (2000). Nagarjuna's Criticism of the Concept of Substance and its Implications for Sunyata. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):421-438.
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  32. Christian Thomas Kohl (2012). Pratityasamutpada in Eastern and Western Modes of Thought. International Association of Buddhist Universities 4 (2012):68-80.
    Nagarjuna and Quantum physics. Eastern and Western Modes of Thought. Summary. The key terms. 1. Key term: ‘Emptiness’. The Indian philosopher Nagarjuna ( 2nd century BC ) is known in the history of Buddhism mainly by his keyword ‘sunyata’. This word is translated into English by the word ‘emptiness’. The translation and the traditional interpretations create the impression that Nagarjuna declares the objects as empty or illusionary or not real or not existing. What is the assertion and concrete (...)
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  33.  15
    Giuseppe Ferraro (2013). Outlines of a Pedagogical Interpretation of Nāgārjuna's Two Truths Doctrine. Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (5):563-590.
    This paper proposes an interpretation of Nāgārjuna’s doctrine of the two truths that considers saṃvṛti and paramārtha-satya two visions of reality on which the Buddhas, for soteriological and pedagogical reasons, build teachings of two types: respectively in agreement with (for example, the teaching of the Four Noble Truths) or in contrast to (for example, the teaching of emptiness) the category of svabhāva. The early sections of the article show to what extent the various current interpretations of the Nāgārjunian doctrine of (...)
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  34.  2
    Kenneth Masong (2013). Becoming-Religion: Re-/Thinking Religion with AN Whitehead and Keiji Nishitani. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 17 (2):1-26.
    For Whitehead and Nishitani, a rethinking of religion necessitates a rethinking of the metaphysics that underlie one’s concept of religion. The dynamism of religion is unveiled only within the metaphysical grounding of an ontology that accommodates the philosophical preference of “becoming” as an ultimate category of reality. The novelty of Whitehead’s theory of religion lies in the process metaphysics that it presupposes. For him, religion, like the whole of reality, is inherently developing and evolving. What Nishitani offers is a rethinking (...)
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  35. Christian Thomas Kohl (2008). Buddhism and Quantum Physics. Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies 9 (2008):45-62.
    Rudyard Kipling, the famous english author of « The Jungle Book », born in India, wrote one day these words: « Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet ». In my paper I show that Kipling was not completely right. I try to show the common ground between buddhist philosophy and quantum physics. There is a surprising parallelism between the philosophical concept of reality articulated by Nagarjuna and the physical concept of reality (...)
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  36.  1
    Keiji Nishitani & Jan van Bragt (1987). Religion and Nothingness. Philosophy East and West 37 (4):458-462.
    In _Religion and Nothingness_ the leading representative of the Kyoto School of Philosophy lays the foundation of thought for a world in the making, for a world united beyond the differences of East and West. Keiji Nishitani notes the irreversible trend of Western civilization to nihilism, and singles out the conquest of nihilism as _the_ task for contemporary philosophy. Nihility, or relative nothingness, can only be overcome by being radicalized to Emptiness, or absolute nothingness. Taking absolute nothingness as the fundamental (...)
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  37.  53
    David Burton (1999). Emptiness Appraised: A Critical Study of Nāgārjuna's Philosophy. Curzon.
    Emptiness means that all entities are empty of, or lack, inherent existence - entities have a merely conceptual, constructed existence. Though Nagarjuna advocates the Middle Way, his philosophy of emptiness nevertheless entails nihilism, and his critiques of the Nyaya theory of knowledge are shown to be unconvincing.
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  38. Peter Paul Kakol (2009). Emptiness and Becoming: Integrating Mādhyamika Buddhism and Process Philosophy. D.K. Printworld.
     
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  39. Elizabeth Napper (1989). Dependent-Arising and Emptiness: A Tibetan Buddhist Interpretation of Mādhyamika Philosophy Emphasizing the Compatibility of Emptiness and Conventional Phenomena. Wisdom Publications.
  40.  13
    Brian Edward Brown (2004). Environmental Ethics and Cosmology: A Buddhist Perspective. Zygon 39 (4):885-900.
  41.  55
    Malcolm David Eckel (1994). To See the Buddha: A Philosopher's Quest for the Meaning of Emptiness. Princeton University Press.
    Malcolm David Eckel takes us on a contemporary quest to discover the essential meaning behind the Buddha's many representations. Eckel's bold thesis proposes that the proper understanding of Buddhist philosophy must be thoroughly religious--an understanding revealed in Eckel's new translation of the philospher Bhavaviveka's major work, The Flame of Reason. Eckel shows that the dimensions of early Indian Buddhism--popular art, conventional piety, and critical philosophy--all work together to express the same religious yearning for the fullness of emptiness that Buddha conveys.
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  42.  42
    Newman Robert Glass (1995). Working Emptiness: Toward a Third Reading of Emptiness in Buddhism and Postmodern Thought. Scholars Press.
    Newman Robert Glass argues that there are three workings of emptiness capable of grounding thinking and behavior: presence, difference, and essence. The first two readings, exemplified by Heidegger and Mark C. Taylor respectively, present opposing views of the work of emptiness in thinking. The third, essence, presents a position on the work of emptiness in desire and affect. Glass begins by offering a close analysis of presence and difference. He then fashions his own understanding of essence, or emptiness. He goes (...)
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  43.  17
    Boris H. J. M. Brummans (2008). Preliminary Insights Into the Constitution of a Tibetan Buddhist Monastery Through Autoethnographic Reflections on the Dual/Nondual Mind Duality. Anthropology of Consciousness 19 (2):134-154.
    In this autoethnographic essay, I reflect on my brief personal experiences of conducting field research on ways in which way a small group of Tibetan Buddhist monks enact a monastic total institution in Ladakh, India. More specifically, I analyze my experiences in view of the relationship between dual and nondual mind, as discussed by Henry Vyner (2002) in Anthropology of Consciousness, and use this analysis to develop preliminary insights into the ways in which a Tibetan Buddhist monastery is constituted.
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  44. Bettina Baumer & John R. Dupuche (eds.) (2005). Void and Fullness in the Buddhist, Hindu, and Christian Traditions: Sunya-Purna-Pleroma. D.K. Printworld.
     
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  45. Jayant Burde (2009). Śūnya and Nothingness in Science, Philosophy and Religion. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    pt. 1. Elementary concepts -- pt. 2. Zero in mathematics -- pt. 3. Philosophy and religion -- pt. 4. Science.
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  46. Mădavacciyē Dhammajōti (2009). Concept of Emptiness in Pāli Literature. Godage International Publishers.
  47. Tandra Patnaik (2005). Śūnya Puruṣa: Bauddha Vaiṣṇavism of Orissa. D.K. Printworld in Association with Department of Special Assistance in Philosophy, Utkal University.
     
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  48. Artur Przybysławski (2009). Buddyjska Filozofia Pustki. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego.
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  49. Giancarlo Vianello (2011). Colligite Fragmenta: La Questione Del Nulla. Rubbettino.
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  50.  43
    Jan Westerhoff (2009). Nāgārjuna's Madhyamaka: A Philosophical Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    The Indian philosopher Acarya Nagarjuna (c. 150-250 CE) was the founder of the Madhyamaka (Middle Path) school of Mahayana Buddhism and arguably the most influential Buddhist thinker after Buddha himself. Indeed, in the Tibetan and East Asian traditions, Nagarjuna is often referred to as the "second Buddha." This book presents a survey of the whole of Nagarjuna's philosophy based on his key philosophical writings. His primary contribution to Buddhist thought lies in the further development of the concept of sunyata (...)
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