Search results for 'Superposition principle (Physics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  29
    Richard Schlegel (1980). Superposition & Interaction: Coherence in Physics. University of Chicago Press.
  2. Richard Schlegel (1980). Superposition & Interaction Coherence in Physics /Richard Schlegel. --. --. University of Chicago Press,1980.
     
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  3.  19
    J. Gruszczak, M. Heller & P. Multarzynski (1989). Physics with and Without the Equivalence Principle. Foundations of Physics 19 (5):607-618.
    A differential manifold (d-manifold, for short) can be defined as a pair (M, C), where M is any set and C is a family of real functions on M which is (i) closed with respect to localization and (ii) closed with respect to superposition with smooth Euclidean functions; one also assumes that (iii) M is locally diffeomorphic to Rn. These axioms have a straightforward physical interpretation. Axioms (i) and (ii) formalize certain “compatibility conditions” which usually are supposed to be (...)
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  4.  6
    C. Wolf (1990). Testing Discrete Quantum Mechanics Using Neutron Interferometry and the Superposition Principle—A Gedanken Experiment. Foundations of Physics 20 (1):133-137.
    Using a neutron interferometer and the phase difference calculated from spatial discrete quantum mechanics, a test for discrete quantum theory may implemented by measuring the X spin polarization and its variation with position.
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  5.  38
    Richard Schlegel (1970). Statistical Explanation in Physics: The Copenhagen Interpretation. Synthese 21 (1):65 - 82.
    The statistical aspects of quantum explanation are intrinsic to quantum physics; individual quantum events are created in the interactions associated with observation and are not describable by predictive theory. The superposition principle shows the essential difference between quantum and non-quantum physics, and the principle is exemplified in the classic single-photon two-slit interference experiment. Recently Mandel and Pfleegor have done an experiment somewhat similar to the optical single-photon experiment but with two independently operated lasers; interference is obtained even (...)
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  6.  97
    Diederik Aerts (2009). Quantum Particles as Conceptual Entities: A Possible Explanatory Framework for Quantum Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 14 (4):361-411.
    We put forward a possible new interpretation and explanatory framework for quantum theory. The basic hypothesis underlying this new framework is that quantum particles are conceptual entities. More concretely, we propose that quantum particles interact with ordinary matter, nuclei, atoms, molecules, macroscopic material entities, measuring apparatuses, in a similar way to how human concepts interact with memory structures, human minds or artificial memories. We analyze the most characteristic aspects of quantum theory, i.e. entanglement and non-locality, interference and superposition, identity (...)
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  7.  3
    Marco Zaopo (2015). Information Theoretic Characterization of Physical Theories with Projective State Space. Foundations of Physics 45 (8):943-958.
    Probabilistic theories are a natural framework to investigate the foundations of quantum theory and possible alternative or deeper theories. In a generic probabilistic theory, states of a physical system are represented as vectors of outcomes probabilities and state spaces are convex cones. In this picture the physics of a given theory is related to the geometric shape of the cone of states. In quantum theory, for instance, the shape of the cone of states corresponds to a projective space over complex (...)
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  8.  16
    Massimo Pauri (2011). Epistemic Primacy Vs. Ontological Elusiveness of Spatial Extension: Is There an Evolutionary Role for the Quantum? Foundations of Physics 41 (11):1677-1702.
    A critical re-examination of the history of the concepts of space (including spacetime of general relativity and relativistic quantum field theory) reveals a basic ontological elusiveness of spatial extension, while, at the same time, highlighting the fact that its epistemic primacy seems to be unavoidably imposed on us (as stated by A.Einstein “giving up the extensional continuum … is like to breathe in airless space”). On the other hand, Planck’s discovery of the atomization of action leads to the fundamental recognition (...)
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  9.  71
    G. S. Paraoanu (2011). Partial Measurements and the Realization of Quantum-Mechanical Counterfactuals. Foundations of Physics 41 (7):1214-1235.
    We propose partial measurements as a conceptual tool to understand how to operate with counterfactual claims in quantum physics. Indeed, unlike standard von Neumann measurements, partial measurements can be reversed probabilistically. We first analyze the consequences of this rather unusual feature for the principle of superposition, for the complementarity principle, and for the issue of hidden variables. Then we move on to exploring non-local contexts, by reformulating the EPR paradox, the quantum teleportation experiment, and the entanglement-swapping protocol (...)
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  10.  36
    Roger Penrose (2014). On the Gravitization of Quantum Mechanics 1: Quantum State Reduction. Foundations of Physics 44 (5):557-575.
    This paper argues that the case for “gravitizing” quantum theory is at least as strong as that for quantizing gravity. Accordingly, the principles of general relativity must influence, and actually change, the very formalism of quantum mechanics. Most particularly, an “Einsteinian”, rather than a “Newtonian” treatment of the gravitational field should be adopted, in a quantum system, in order that the principle of equivalence be fully respected. This leads to an expectation that quantum superpositions of states involving a significant (...)
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  11.  77
    Wayne C. Myrvold & Joy Christian (eds.) (2009). Quantum Reality, Relativistic Causality, and Closing the Epistemic Circle. Springer.
    Part I Introduction -/- Passion at a Distance (Don Howard) -/- Part II Philosophy, Methodology and History -/- Balancing Necessity and Fallibilism: Charles Sanders Peirce on the Status of Mathematics and its Intersection with the Inquiry into Nature (Ronald Anderson) -/- Newton’s Methodology (William Harper) -/- Whitehead’s Philosophy and Quantum Mechanics (QM): A Tribute to Abner Shimony (Shimon Malin) -/- Bohr and the Photon (John Stachel) -/- Part III Bell’s Theorem and Nonlocality A. Theory -/- Extending the Concept of an (...)
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  12. Allan F. Randall, Modality in Computational Metaphysics.
    The many worlds anthropic principle is explored here from the a priori perspective of rationalist metaphysics, within the framework of modal logic. It is shown how the apparent contradictions of quantum superposition can be thought of in terms of different levels of world models. The framework of modal logic is used, but given the rationalist assumption that all possible worlds exist. There is thus no absolute distinction between possibility and necessity. To take the point of view of a (...)
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  13.  50
    Dirk Aerts (1982). Description of Many Separated Physical Entities Without the Paradoxes Encountered in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 12 (12):1131-1170.
    We show that it is impossible in quantum mechanics to describe two separated physical systems. This is due to the mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. It is possible to give a description of two separated systems in a theory which is a generalization of quantum mechanics and of classical mechanics, in the sense that this theory contains both theories as special cases. We identify the axioms of quantum mechanics that make it impossible to describe separated systems. One of these axioms (...)
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  14.  57
    Diederik Aerts & Thomas Durt (1994). Quantum, Classical and Intermediate: An Illustrative Example. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 24 (10):1353-1369.
    We present a model that allows one to build structures that evolve continuously from classical to quantum, and we study the intermediate situations, giving rise to structures that are neither classical nor quantum. We construct the closure structure corresponding to the collection of eigenstate sets of these intermediate situations, and demonstrate how the superposition principle disappears during the transition from quantum to classical. We investigate the validity of the axioms of quantum mechanics for the intermediate situations.
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  15.  11
    Jeffrey Bub (1988). How to Solve the Measurement Problem of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 18 (7):701-722.
    A solution to the measurement problem of quantum mechanics is proposed within the framework of an intepretation according to which only quantum systems with an infinite number of degrees of freedom have determinate properties, i.e., determinate values for (some) observables of the theory. The important feature of the infinite case is the existence of many inequivalent irreducible Hilbert space representations of the algebra of observables, which leads, in effect, to a restriction on the superposition principle, and hence the (...)
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  16.  14
    Shan Gao (2013). Does Gravity Induce Wavefunction Collapse? An Examination of Penrose's Conjecture. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (2):148-151.
    According to Penrose, the fundamental conflict between the superposition principle of quantum mechanics and the principle of general covariance of general relativity entails the existence of wavefunction collapse, e.g. a quantum superposition of two different space–time geometries will collapse to one of them due to the ill-definedness of the time-translation operator for the superposition. In this paper, we argue that Penrose's conjecture on gravity's role in wavefunction collapse is debatable. First of all, it is still (...)
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  17.  16
    Robert Warren Finkel (1973). Generalized Schrödinger Quantization. Foundations of Physics 3 (1):101-108.
    Schrödinger's original quantization procedure is extended to include observables with classical counterparts described in generalized coordinates and momenta. The procedure satisfies the superposition principle, the correspondence principle, Hermiticity requirements, and gauge invariance. Examples are given to demonstrate the derivation of operators in generalized coordinates or momenta. It is shown that separation of variables can be achieved before quantization.
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  18.  12
    L. De la Peña & A. M. Cetto (1975). Stochastic Theory for Classical and Quantum Mechanical Systems. Foundations of Physics 5 (2):355-370.
    We formulate from first principles a theory of stochastic processes in configuration space. The fundamental equations of the theory are an equation of motion which generalizes Newton's second law and an equation which expresses the condition of conservation of matter. Two types of stochastic motion are possible, both described by the same general equations, but leading in one case to classical Brownian motion behavior and in the other to quantum mechanical behavior. The Schrödinger equation, which is derived here with no (...)
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  19.  4
    Luis J. Boya (1989). State Space as Projective Space. The Case of Massless Particles. Foundations of Physics 19 (11):1363-1370.
    The fact that the space of states of a quantum mechanical system is a projective space (as opposed to a linear manifold) has many consequences. We develop some of these here. First, the space is nearly contractible, namely all the finite homotopy groups (except the second) vanish (i.e., it is the Eilenberg-MacLane space K(ℤ, 2)). Moreover, there is strictly speaking no “superposition principle” in quantum mechanics as one cannot “add” rays; instead, there is adecomposition principle by which (...)
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  20.  9
    M. Božić, Z. Marić & J. P. Vigier (1992). De Broglian Probabilities in the Double-Slit Experiment. Foundations of Physics 22 (11):1325-1344.
    A new probability interpretation of interference phenomena in the double-slit experiment is proposed. It differs from the standard interpretation (based on elementary events happening in complementary, mutually exclusive setups—arrivals of waves to the screen when one of the slits is closed) which encounters the “paradox” that the law of total probability is violated. This new interpretation is free of such difficulties and paradoxes since it is based on compatible elementary events (events happening in the same setup in which happenall events (...)
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  21.  17
    V. K. Thankappan & P. Gopalakrishna Nambi (1980). A Modified Set of Feynman Postulates in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 10 (3-4):217-236.
    Certain modifications, by way of improvement, are proposed for the Feynman postulates in quantum mechanics. These modifications incorporate a criterion for the applicability of the principle of superposition. It is shown that the modified postulates, together with certain assumptions regarding the trajectory of a particle, lead to an expression for the position-momentum uncertainty relationship which is broadly in agreement with the conventional expression. The time-energy uncertainty relationship is, however, found to have a likely place only in the relativistic (...)
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  22.  16
    Howard Grotch & Emil Kazes (1980). Difficulties with the Partial Quantization of Systems. Foundations of Physics 10 (7-8):655-659.
    Proposals of quantizing matter without also quantizing fields are assessed. In one of these the principle of superposition is given up and an estimate of its violation is suggested. Another proposal, which retains the principle of superposition, is shown to be inconsistent with the equations of motion.
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  23.  13
    A. J. Leggett (1988). Experimental Approaches to the Quantum Measurement Paradox. Foundations of Physics 18 (9):939-952.
    I examine the question of how far experiments that look for the effects of superposition of macroscopically distinct states are relevant to the classic measurement paradox of quantum mechanics. Existing experiments on superconducting devices confirm the predictions of the quantum formalism extrapolated to the macroscopic level, and to that extent provide strong circumstantial evidence for its validity at this level, but do not directly test the principle of superposition of macrostates. A more ambitious experiment, not obviously infeasible (...)
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  24.  8
    Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano & Alessandro Tosini (2013). Emergence of Space–Time From Topologically Homogeneous Causal Networks. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (3):294-299.
    In this paper we study the emergence of Minkowski space–time from a discrete causal network representing a classical information flow. Differently from previous approaches, we require the network to be topologically homogeneous, so that the metric is derived from pure event-counting. Emergence from events has an operational motivation in requiring that every physical quantity—including space–time—be defined through precise measurement procedures. Topological homogeneity is a requirement for having space–time metric emergent from the pure topology of causal connections, whereas physically homogeneity corresponds (...)
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