Search results for 'Suresh D. Muthukumaraswamy' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Suresh D. Muthukumaraswamy (2013). High-Frequency Brain Activity and Muscle Artifacts in MEG/EEG: A Review and Recommendations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 870.0
    In recent years high-frequency brain activity in the gamma-frequency band (30 to 80 Hz) and above has become the focus of a growing body of work in MEG/EEG research. Unfortunately, high-frequency neural activity overlaps entirely with the spectral bandwidth of muscle activity (~20-300 Hz). It is becoming appreciated that artifacts of muscle activity may contaminate a number of non-invasive reports of high frequency activity. In this review, the spectral, spatial and temporal characteristics of muscle artifacts are compared with those described (...)
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  2. Suresh D. Muthukumaraswamy & Blake W. Johnson (2007). A Dual Mechanism Neural Framework for Social Understanding. Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):43 – 63.score: 870.0
    In this paper a theoretical framework is proposed for how the brain processes the information necessary for us to achieve the understanding of others that we experience in our social worlds. Our framework attempts to expand several previous approaches to more fully account for the various data on interpersonal understanding and to respond to theoretical critiques in this area. Specifically, we propose that social understanding must be achieved by at least two mechanisms in the brain that are capable of parallel (...)
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  3. K. D. Singh J. B. Swettenham, S. D. Muthukumaraswamy (2013). BOLD Responses in Human Primary Visual Cortex Are Insensitive to Substantial Changes in Neural Activity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 28.0
    The relationship between BOLD-fMRI (blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) metrics were explored using low-level visual stimuli known to elicit a rich variety of neural responses. Stimuli were either perceptually isoluminant red/green or luminance-modulated black/yellow square-wave gratings with spatial frequencies of 0.5, 3 and 6 cycles per degree. Neural responses were measured with BOLD-fMRI (3-tesla) and whole head MEG. For all stimuli, the BOLD response showed bilateral activation of early visual cortex that was greater in the (...)
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