Search results for 'Survival' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Heidi Savage, What Matters in Survival: Life Trajectories and the Possibility of Virtual Immersion.
    The immediate goal of this paper is to establish that one can both agree with Parfit that identity is not what matters in survival and yet still maintain that the concept of a persisting person requires singularity over time. That is, fission cannot preserve what matters in survival. This can be maintained once one recognizes an externalist constraint on preserving what matters. Specifically, I claim that what matters in the survival of persons is something Parfit might call (...)
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  2.  68
    Torin Alter & Stuart Rachels (2005). Nothing Matters in Survival. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):311-330.
    Do I have a special reason to care about my future, as opposed to yours? We reject the common belief that I do. Putting our thesis paradoxically, we say that nothing matters in survival: nothing in our continued existence justifies any special self-concern. Such an "extreme" view is standardly tied to ideas about the metaphysics of persons, but not by us. After rejecting various arguments against our thesis, we conclude that simplicity decides in its favor. Throughout the essay we (...)
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  3.  20
    Krishna Mani Pathak (2010). Poverty and Hunger in the Developing World: Ethics, the Global Economy, and Human Survival. Asia Journal of Global Studies 3 (2):88-102.
    The large number of hungry people in a global economy based on industrialization, privatization, and free trade raises the question of the ethical dimensions of the worsening food crisis in the world in general and in developing countries in particular. Who bears the moral responsibility for the tragic situation in Africa and Asia where people are starving due to poverty? Who is morally responsible for their poverty - the hungry people themselves? the international community? any particular agency or institution? In (...)
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  4. Andrew A. Brennan (1982). Personal Identity and Personal Survival. Analysis 42 (January):44-50.
    Parfit argues that survival, Not identity, Is the important thing in cases of personal resurrection, Fission, Etc. I argue that parfit's and dennett's well known cases--And fantasies about cloning and telecloning--Suggest a distinction between type and token persons, Memories, Intentions, Etc. Parfit is wrong, I suggest, To think survival more determinate than identity; with quine I hold that there is no objective matter to be right or wrong about.
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  5.  70
    Scott Campbell (2005). Is Causation Necessary for What Matters in Survival? Philosophical Studies 126 (3):375-396.
    In this paper I shall argue that if the Parfitian psychological criterion or theory of personal identity is true, then a good case can be made out to show that the psychological theorist should accept the view I call “psychological sequentialism”. This is the view that a causal connection is not necessary for what matters in survival, as long as certain other conditions are met. I argue this by way of Parfit’s own principle that what matters in survival (...)
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  6.  60
    Barry F. Dainton (1996). Survival and Experience. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96:17 - 36.
    (Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 1996: 17-36) I If I am to survive until some later date, what must happen, and what must not happen, over the intervening period? I am talking here about survival in the strict sense. Take an earlier and a later person, if they are one and the same, what is it about them that makes this so? In addressing this question the preferred tool has long been the exploitation of imaginary or science fiction cases. (...)
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  7.  13
    Stuart Rachels & Torin Alter (2005). Nothing Matters in Survival. Journal of Ethics 9 (3/4):311 - 330.
    Do I have a special reason to care about my future, as opposed to yours? We reject the common belief that I do. Putting our thesis paradoxically, we say that nothing matters in survival: nothing in our continued existence justifies any special self-concern. Such an "extreme" view is standardly tied to ideas about the metaphysics of persons, but not by us. After rejecting various arguments against our thesis, we conclude that simplicity decides in its favor. Throughout the essay we (...)
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  8.  23
    W. Ford Doolittle (2014). Natural Selection Through Survival Alone, and the Possibility of Gaia. Biology and Philosophy 29 (3):415-423.
    Here I advance two related evolutionary propositions. (1) Natural selection is most often considered to require competition between reproducing “individuals”, sometimes quite broadly conceived, as in cases of clonal, species or multispecies-community selection. But differential survival of non-competing and non-reproducing individuals will also result in increasing frequencies of survival-promoting “adaptations” among survivors, and thus is also a kind of natural selection. (2) Darwinists have challenged the view that the Earth’s biosphere is an evolved global homeostatic system. Since there (...)
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  9.  46
    James Baillie (1993). What Matters in Survival. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):255-61.
    I examine Derek Parfit’s claim that it doesn’t matter whether he survives in the future, if someone survives who is psychologically connected to him by “Relation R.” Thus, were his body to perish and be replaced by an exact duplicate, both physically and psychologically identical to him, this would be just as good as “ordinary” survival. Parfit takes the corollary view that replacement of loved ones by exact duplicates is no loss. In contrast, Peter Unger argues that we place (...)
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  10.  35
    Bouchard Frédéric (2011). Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):106-114.
    Following Wallace’s suggestion, Darwin framed his theory using Spencer’s expression “survival of the fittest”. Since then, fitness occupies a significant place in the conventional understanding of Darwinism, even though the explicit meaning of the term ‘fitness’ is rarely stated. In this paper I examine some of the different roles that fitness has played in the development of the theory. Whereas the meaning of fitness was originally understood in ecological terms, it took a statistical turn in terms of reproductive success (...)
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  11.  9
    Charles Verharen, John Tharakan, Flordeliz Bugarin, Joseph Fortunak, Gada Kadoda & George Middendorf (2014). Survival Ethics in the Real World: The Research University and Sustainable Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):135-154.
    We discuss how academically-based interdisciplinary teams can address the extreme challenges of the world’s poorest by increasing access to the basic necessities of life. The essay’s first part illustrates the evolving commitment of research universities to develop ethical solutions for populations whose survival is at risk and whose quality of life is deeply impaired. The second part proposes a rationale for university responsibility to solve the problems of impoverished populations at a geographical remove. It also presents a framework for (...)
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  12. Kevin J. Corcoran (2001). Physical Persons and Postmortem Survival Without Temporal Gaps. In Soul, Body, and Survival. Ithaca: Cornell University Press
  13.  17
    L. Dennis, R. W. Gray, L. H. Kauffman, J. Brender McNair & N. J. Woolf (2009). A Framework Linking Non-Living and Living Systems: Classification of Persistence, Survival and Evolution Transitions. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 14 (3):217-238.
    We propose a framework for analyzing the development, operation and failure to survive of all things, living, non-living or organized groupings. This framework is a sequence of developments that improve survival capability. Framework processes range from origination of any entity/system, to the development of increased survival capability and development of life-forms and organizations that use intelligence. This work deals with a series of developmental changes that arise from the uncovering of emergent properties. The framework is intended to be (...)
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  14.  13
    Cynthia D. Rittenhouse (1996). Survival Skills and Ethics Training for Graduate Students: A Graduate Student Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (3):367-380.
    Graduate students in the sciences must develop practical skills geared toward scientific survival and success. This is particularly true now, given the paucity of research funds and jobs. Along with more elementary skills, research ethics should be an integral part of students’ scientific training. Survival skills include research skills, communication skills, general efficiency, and preparation for post-graduate work. Ethics training covers guidelines for use of animal and human subjects, data treatment, disclosure, credit issues, conflicts of interest, and response (...)
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  15.  6
    C. Verharen, J. Tharakan, G. Middendorf, M. Castro-Sitiriche & G. Kadoda (2013). Introducing Survival Ethics Into Engineering Education and Practice. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):599-623.
    Given the possibilities of synthetic biology, weapons of mass destruction and global climate change, humans may achieve the capacity globally to alter life. This crisis calls for an ethics that furnishes effective motives to take global action necessary for survival. We propose a research program for understanding why ethical principles change across time and culture. We also propose provisional motives and methods for reaching global consensus on engineering field ethics. Current interdisciplinary research in ethics, psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary theory (...)
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  16. J. Seibt (2002). Fission, Sameness, and Survival: Parfit's Branch Line Argument Revisited. Metaphysica 1 (2):95-134.
    Parfit’s Branch Line argument is intended to show that the relation of survival is possibly a one-many relation and thus different from numerical identity. I offer a detailed reconstruction of Parfit’s notions of survival and personal identity, and show the argument cannot be coherently formulated within Parfit’s own setting. More specifically, I argue that Parfit’s own specifications imply that the “R-relation”, i.e., the relation claimed to capture of “what matters in survival,” turns out to hold not only (...)
     
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  17.  27
    Eric Steinhart (2007). Survival as a Digital Ghost. Minds and Machines 17 (3):261 – 271.
    You can survive after death in various kinds of artifacts. You can survive in diaries, photographs, sound recordings, and movies. But these artifacts record only superficial features of yourself. We are already close to the construction of programs that partially and approximately replicate entire human lives (by storing their memories and duplicating their personalities). A digital ghost is an artificially intelligent program that knows all about your life. It is an animated auto-biography. It replicates your patterns of belief and desire. (...)
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  18. Rebecca Roache (2010). Fission, Cohabitation and the Concern for Future Survival. Analysis 70 (2):256-263.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  19.  14
    Mark Vincent (2012). Cancer: A de‐Repression of a Default Survival Program Common to All Cells? Bioessays 34 (1):72-82.
  20.  46
    Marya Schechtman (2004). Personality and Persistence: The Many Faces of Personal Survival. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (2):87-106.
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  21.  5
    Karla Hemming & Jane Luise Hutton (2012). Bayesian Sensitivity Models for Missing Covariates in the Analysis of Survival Data. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):238-246.
  22. Kim Sterelny (2001). Dawkins Vs. Gould Survival of the Fittest.
     
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  23.  31
    Steve Matthews (2000). Survival and Separation. Philosophical Studies 98 (3):279-303.
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  24. Jenefer M. Robinson (1988). Personal Identity and Survival. Journal of Philosophy 85 (June):319-28.
  25.  4
    John L. Moran, Andrew D. Bersten, Patricia J. Solomon, Cyrus Edibam & Tamara Hunt (2008). Modelling Survival in Acute Severe Illness: Cox Versus Accelerated Failure Time Models. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (1):83-93.
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  26.  55
    Neil McKinnon & John C. Bigelow (2001). Parfit, Causation, and Survival. Philosophia 28 (1-4):467-476.
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  27.  71
    Douglas E. Ehring (1987). Survival and Trivial Facts. Analysis 47 (January):50-54.
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  28.  44
    Scott Campbell (2001). Is Connectedess Necessary to What Matters in Survival? Ration 14 (3):193-202.
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  29.  74
    Terence W. Penelhum (1959). Personal Identity, Memory, and Survival. Journal of Philosophy 56 (June):319-328.
  30.  8
    Ole Hagen (1992). Survival Through the Allais Paradox. Theory and Decision 32 (2):209-217.
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  31.  2
    Li‐Sheng Chen, Ming‐Fang Yen, Hui‐Min Wu, Chao‐Sheng Liao, Der‐Ming Liou, Hsu‐Sung Kuo & Tony Hsiu‐Hsi Chen (2005). Predictive Survival Model with Time‐Dependent Prognostic Factors: Development of Computer‐Aided SAS Macro Program. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (2):181-193.
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  32.  32
    L. Nathan Oaklander (1988). Shoemaker on the Duplication Argument, Survival, and What Matters. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (June):234-239.
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  33.  29
    Nicholas Measor (1980). On What Matters in Survival. Mind 89 (3):406-11.
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  34.  17
    John E. Pogue (1993). Identity, Survival, and the Reasonableness of Replication. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):45-70.
  35.  13
    R. Martin (1992). Self-Interest and Survival. American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (4):319-30.
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  36.  3
    Jenna Wong, Monica Taljaard, Alan J. Forster, Gabriel J. Escobar & Carl van Walraven (2013). Addition of Time‐Dependent Covariates to a Survival Model Significantly Improved Predictions for Daily Risk of Hospital Death. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (2):351-357.
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  37.  4
    Karen Bailie, Iain Dobie, Stephen Kirk & Michael Donnelly (2007). Survival After Breast Cancer Treatment: The Impact of Provider Volume. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (5):749-757.
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  38.  1
    Adel Shahnam, David M. Roder, Elizabeth A. Tracey, Susan J. Neuhaus, Michael P. Brown & Michael J. Sorich (2014). Can Cancer Registries Show Whether Treatment is Contributing to Survival Increases for Melanoma of the Skin at a Population Level? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (1):74-80.
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  39.  1
    Alexander R. P. Walker & Karen E. Charlton (1999). Brief Communication: Evaluating Changes in Life Expectancy and Survival in the Elderly. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (1):57-63.
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  40.  2
    Wei‐Chu Chie, Yi‐Hsin Chang & Hsiu‐Hsi Chen (2007). A Novel Method for Evaluation of Improved Survival Trend for Common Cancer: Early Detection or Improvement of Medical Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):79-85.
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  41.  1
    Dhaval Ghelani, John L. Moran, Andy Sloggett, Richard J. Leeson & Sandra L. Peake (2009). Long‐Term Survival of Intensive Care and Hospital Patient Cohorts Compared with the General Australian Population: A Relative Survival Approach. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (3):425-435.
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  42.  1
    Colin Luke, Grantley Gill, Stephen Birrell, Vlad Humeniuk, Martin Borg, Christos Karapetis, Bogda Koczwara, Ian Olver, Michael Penniment & Ken Pittman (2007). Treatment and Survival From Breast Cancer: The Experience of Patients at South Australian Teaching Hospitals Between 1977 and 2003. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (2):212-220.
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  43.  2
    Rebecca Sear (2008). Kin and Child Survival in Rural Malawi. Human Nature 19 (3):277-293.
    This paper investigates the impact of kin on child survival in a matrilineal society in Malawi. Women usually live in close proximity to their matrilineal kin in this agricultural community, allowing opportunities for helping behavior between matrilineal relatives. However, there is little evidence that matrilineal kin are beneficial to children. On the contrary, child mortality rates appear to be higher in the presence of maternal grandmothers and maternal aunts. These effects are modified by the sex of child and resource (...)
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  44.  14
    Frédéric Bouchard (2011). Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):106-114.
    Following Wallace’s suggestion, Darwin framed his theory using Spencer’s expression “survival of the fittest”. Since then, fitness occupies a significant place in the conventional understanding of Darwinism, even though the explicit meaning of the term ‘fitness’ is rarely stated. In this paper I examine some of the different roles that fitness has played in the development of the theory. Whereas the meaning of fitness was originally understood in ecological terms, it took a statistical turn in terms of reproductive success (...)
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  45.  85
    Dean Zimmerman (1999). The Compatibility of Materialism and Survival. Faith and Philosophy 16 (2):194-212.
    It is not easy to be a materialist and yet believe that there is a way for human beings to survive death. Peter van Inwagen identifies the central obstacle the materialist faces: Namely, the need to posit appropriate “immanent-causal” connections between my body as it is at death and some living body elsewhere or elsewhen. I offer a proposal, consistent with van Inwagen’s own materialist metaphysics, for making materialism compatible with the possibility of survival.
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  46.  29
    Raymond Martin (1998). Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the philosophical literature on the nature of the self, personal identity, and survival. Its distinctive methodology is one that is phenomenologically descriptive rather than metaphysical and normative. On the basis of this approach Raymond Martin shows that the distinction between self and other is not nearly as fundamental a feature of our so-called egoistic values as has been traditionally thought. He explains how the belief in a self as a fixed, continuous point (...)
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  47.  22
    Sherrilyn Roush (2010). The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Survival. Metaphilosophy 41 (3):255-278.
    Abstract: Knowledge requires more than mere true belief, and we also tend to think it is more valuable. I explain the added value that knowledge contributes if its extra ingredient beyond true belief is tracking . I show that the tracking conditions are the unique conditions on knowledge that achieve for those who fulfill them a strict Nash Equilibrium and an Evolutionarily Stable Strategy in what I call the True Belief Game. The added value of these properties, intuitively, includes preparedness (...)
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  48.  98
    Beth A. Fischer & Michael J. Zigmond (2001). Promoting Responsible Conduct in Research Through “Survival Skills” Workshops: Some Mentoring is Best Done in a Crowd. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):563-587.
    For graduate students to succeed as professionals, they must develop a set of general “survival skills”. These include writing research articles, making oral presentations, obtaining employment and funding, supervising, and teaching. Traditionally, graduate programs have offered little training in many of these skills. Our educational model provides individuals with formal instruction in each area, including their ethical dimensions. Infusion of research ethics throughout a professional skills curriculum helps to emphasize that responsible conduct is integral to succeeding as a researcher. (...)
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  49.  56
    Mark T. Nelson (2010). Y and Z Are Not Off the Hook: The Survival Lottery Made Fairer. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (4):396-401.
    In this article I show that the argument in John Harris's famous "Survival Lottery" paper cannot be right. Even if we grant Harris's assumptions—of the justifiability of such a lottery, the correctness of maximizing consequentialism, the indistinguishability between killing and letting die, the practical and political feasibility of such a scheme—the argument still will not yield the conclusion that Harris wants. On his own terms, the medically needy should be less favored (and more vulnerable to being killed), than Harris (...)
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  50.  12
    J. Robert G. Williams (2014). Nonclassical Minds and Indeterminate Survival. Philosophical Review 123 (4):379-428.
    Revisionary theories of logic or truth require revisionary theories of mind. This essay outlines nonclassically based theories of rational belief, desire, and decision making, singling out the supervaluational family for special attention. To see these nonclassical theories of mind in action, this essay examines a debate between David Lewis and Derek Parfit over what matters in survival. Lewis argued that indeterminacy in personal identity allows caring about psychological connectedness and caring about personal identity to amount to the same thing. (...)
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