Search results for 'Susan Armstrong-Buck' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. D. M. Armstrong (1978). On Passing the Buck. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):346.
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  2. Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.) (2008). The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, carefully presenting (...)
     
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  3. Richard G. Botzler & Susan J. Armstrong (1998). Environmental Ethics Divergence and Convergence.
     
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  4.  44
    Susan Armstrong (2006). For Love of Matter: A Contemporary Panpsychism. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):99-102.
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  5.  6
    Susan J. Buck (1999). Multiple-Use Commons, Collective Action, and Platforms for Resource Use Negotiation. Agriculture and Human Values 16 (3):237-239.
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  6.  23
    Susan J. Armstrong (1991). Individuality and Cooperative Action. Process Studies 20 (4):248-252.
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  7.  13
    John Abromeit, Mark W. Cobb, Lilian Alweiss, Susan J. Armstrong, Richard G. Botzler, Ronald Aronson, Robin Attfield, Gordon Baker, Katherine Morris & Etienne Balibar (unknown). The Following Books Have Been Received and Are Available for Review. Please Contact the Reviews Editor: Jim. Oshea@ Ucd. Ie. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):517 - 523.
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  8.  4
    Susan J. Armstrong (2008). The Ethics of Creativity. Environmental Ethics 29 (2):209-212.
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  9.  3
    Susan J. Armstrong (1992). In Praise of Pigs. Between the Species 8 (1):8.
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  10.  3
    Susan J. Armstrong (2009). Moral Habitat. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):109-110.
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  11.  10
    Susan Armstrong (2007). The Ethics of Creativity: Beauty, Morality, and a Processive Cosmos. Environmental Ethics 29 (2):209-212.
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  12.  10
    Susan Armstrong (2002). Advanced Technology and Process Philosophy. Process Studies 31 (1):101-129.
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  13.  3
    Susan J. Armstrong (2013). Leslie Paul Thiele: Indra's Net and the Midas Touch: Sustainability in a Connected World. Environmental Ethics 35 (2):255-256.
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  14.  1
    Susan Armstrong (2008). For Love of Matter. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):99-102.
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  15.  6
    Susan J. Armstrong (1999). Being and Value: Toward a Constructive Postmodern Metaphysics. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):425-428.
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  16.  5
    Susan J. Armstrong (2010). Ecological Ethics and the Human Soul. Environmental Ethics 32 (1):99-102.
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  17.  1
    Susan Armstrong (2002). Review of “Utopias, Dolphins and Computers: Problems of Philosophical Plumbing”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 3 (2):16.
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  18. Susan Armstrong & Richard G. Botzler (eds.) (2003). Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, carefully presenting (...)
     
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  19. Susan Armstrong (2004). Introduction. Essays in Philosophy 5 (2).
    This issue of Essays in Philosophy provides evidence both of the dynamic nature of animal ethics and of the multidisciplinary character of the subject. Clearly, animal ethics encompasses not only philosophy and the other humanities, but the natural and social sciences as well. While the essays are arranged alphabetically, the grouping below according to common themes may be of use to some readers.
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  20. Susan J. Armstrong & Richard G. Botzler (eds.) (2016). The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.
    The Animal Ethics Reader is an acclaimed anthology containing both classic and contemporary readings, making it ideal for anyone coming to the subject for the first time. It provides a thorough introduction to the central topics, controversies and ethical dilemmas surrounding the treatment of animals, covering a wide range of contemporary issues, such as animal activism, genetic engineering, and environmental ethics. The extracts are arranged thematically under the following clear headings: Theories of Animal Ethics Nonhuman Animal Experiences Primates and Cetaceans (...)
     
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  21. John C. Trueswell, Yi Lin, Benjamin Armstrong, Erica A. Cartmill, Susan Goldin-Meadow & Lila R. Gleitman (2016). Perceiving Referential Intent: Dynamics of Reference in Natural Parent–Child Interactions. Cognition 148:117-135.
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  22. Donald Vandeveer, Christine Pierce, Susan J. Armstrong, Richard G. Botzler, J. Clarke & Derek Wall (1994). The Environmental Ethics and Policy Book: Philosophy, Ecology, Economics. Environmental Values 3 (3):280-282.
     
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  23. D. M. Armstrong, John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.) (1993). Ontology, Causality, and Mind: Essays in Honor of D.M. Armstrong. Cambridge University Press.
  24. P. Simons, S. Mumford & D. Armstrong (2005). Critical Discussion of David Armstrong, Truth and Truthmakers. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):253.
     
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  25.  3
    D. M. Armstrong (1975). Towards a Theory of Properties: Work in Progress on the Problem of Universals: D. M. Armstrong. Philosophy 50 (192):145-155.
    Many philosophers have declared that everything which exists is a particular. There is a weak interpretation of this doctrine which I believe to be a true proposition, and a strong one which I believe to be false.
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  26. A. H. Armstrong & R. A. Markus (1960). Christian Faith and Greek Philosophy [by] A.H. Armstrong and R.A. Markus. Darton, Longman & Todd.
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  27. A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.) (1981). Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications.
     
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  28. D. M. Armstrong (1996). Place and Armstrong's Views Compared. In Tim Crane (ed.), Dispositions: A Debate. New York: Routledge 33--48.
     
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  29. A. H. Armstrong (1979). The Dimensions of the Self: Buddhi in the Bhagavad-G¯Tā and Psyché in Plotinus: A. H. Armstrong and R. Ravindra. Religious Studies 15 (3):327-342.
    The Bhagavad-Gītā is the most important text in the smrti literature of India, as distinct from the śruti literature which is traditionally regarded as ultimately authoritative. The Bhagavad-Gītā has been assigned a date ranging from the fifth century B.C. to the second century B.C. The Indian religious tradition places the Gītā at the end of the third age of the present cycle of the universe and the beginning of the fourth, namely the Kali Yuga to which we belong.
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  30. Ross Buck (1986). A Psychologist's Reply Ross Buck LeDoux and I Clearly Agree That Psychologists Studying Emotion Must Be Aware of the Work of Neuroscientists to Provide a Framework for Their Ideas, and That Psychological Theory and Research May Provide Leads for Neuroscientists. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Mind and Brain. Methuen 359.
     
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  31. Richard Falckenberg & Andrew Campbell Armstrong (1895). History of Modern Philosophy From Nicolas of Cusa to the Present Time, Tr. By A.C. Armstrong. 1st Amer. Ed.
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  32.  12
    Kevin M. Clark (1982). The Origin of Negative Dialectics: Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, and the Frankfurt Institute, by Susan Buck-Morss;the Melancholy Science: An Introduction to the Thought of Theodor W. Adorno, by Gillian Rose. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 8 (1/2):269-305.
  33.  6
    Roger Chao (2009). Susan J. Armstrong and Richard G. Botzler (Eds.): The Animal Ethics Reader. Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):399-400.
  34.  5
    Roger Chao (2009). Susan J. Armstrong and Richard G. Botzler (Eds.): The Animal Ethics Reader, 2nd Edition. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):399-400.
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  35.  11
    L. J. Ray (1982). Book Reviews : The Origin of Negative Dialectics, Theodore W. Adorno, Walter Benjamin, and the Frankfurt Institute. By Susan Buck-Morss. Brighton: Harvester Press, 1977. Pp. Xv + 335. 10.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 12 (3):340-345.
  36. Nicholas Xenos (1991). Susan Buck-Morss, The Dialects of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (3):159-161.
     
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  37.  3
    Y. Winter (2007). Critical Theory, the War on Terror, and the Limits of Civilization: Holy Terror, by Terry Eagleton. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 160 Pp. $22 . Thinking Past Terror: Islamism and Critical Theory on the Left, by Susan Buck-Morss. London: Verso, 2003. 160 Pp. $22 . Defending Ideals: War, Democracy and Political Struggles, by Drucilla Cornell. New York: Routledge, 2004. 256 Pp. $25.95. [REVIEW] Political Theory 35 (2):207-214.
  38. Willi Bolle, Elvis Cesar Bonassa & Fernanda Pitta (1997). Utopia e engajamento (Entrevista com Susan Buck-Morss). Cadernos de Filosofia Alemã 3.
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  39. Victorian Britain (2008). Allen, Barry. Artifice and Design: Art and Technology in Human Experience. Cornell University Press. 2008. Pp. 213. Armstrong, Susan J. And Richard G. Botzler. The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge. 2008. Pp. 588.£ 18.99. Badiou, Alain. Numbers and Numbers. Polity. 2008. Pp. 240.£ 16.99,£ 50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 83.
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  40. John Schumacher (1988). New Ways of Knowing: The Sciences, Society, and Reconstructive Knowledge by Marcus G. Raskin; Herbert J. Bernstein; Susan Buck-Morss; Noam Chomsky; Michael Goldhaber; Edward S. Herman; Joseph Turner. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 79:312-313.
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  41.  15
    Susan Armstrong-Buck (1986). Whitehead's Metaphysical System as a Foundation for Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 8 (3):241-259.
    Environmental ethics would greatly benefit from an adequate metaphysical foundation. In an attempt to demonstrate the value of Whitehead’s metaphysical system as such a foundation, I first discuss five central tenets of his thought. I then compare aspects of his philosophy with Peter Singer’s utilitarianism, Tom Regan’s rights theory, Aldo Leopold’s land ethic, and Spinoza's system in order to indicate how aWhiteheadian approach can solve the difficulties of the other views as currently developed, and provide the basis for an environmental (...)
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  42.  4
    Susan Armstrong-Buck (1989). Nonhuman Experience. Process Studies 18 (1):1-18.
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  43.  9
    Susan Buck-Morss (2009). Hegel, Haiti and Universal History. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    In this path-breaking work, Susan Buck-Morss draws new connections between history, inequality, social conflict, and human emancipation.
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  44. Susan Buck-Morss (2009). Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    In this path-breaking work, Susan Buck-Morss draws new connections between history, inequality, social conflict, and human emancipation. _Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History_ offers a fundamental reinterpretation of Hegel's master-slave dialectic and points to a way forward to free critical theoretical practice from the prison-house of its own debates. Historicizing the thought of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and the actions taken in the Haitian Revolution, Buck-Morss examines the startling connections between the two and challenges us to widen the boundaries of (...)
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  45. Susan Schneider (2001). Alien Individuals, Alien Universals, and Armstrong's Combinatorial Theory of Possibility. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):575-593.
    Armstrong's combinatorialism, in his own words, is the following project: "My central metaphysical hypothesis is that all there is is the world of space and time. It is this world which is to supply the actual elements for the totality of combinations. So what is proposed is a Naturalistic form of a combinatorial theory."2 Armstrong calls his central hypothesis "Naturalism." He intends his well−known theory of universals to satisfy this thesis. He now attempts to give a naturalistic theory of modality.
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  46. Susan Haack (2011). Pragmatism, Law, and Morality: The Lessons of Buck V. Bell. European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 3:66-87.
    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. – a founding member of the Metaphysical Club, and traditionally regarded as the first legal pragmatist – would eventually become a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. In one of his best-known rulings for the Court, Buck v. Bell , Holmes held that Carrie Buck’s constitutional rights would not be violated by al-lowing the State of Virginia to sterilize her against her will. This disturbing ruling has sometimes been thought to confirm criticisms of Holmes’s moral skepticism. (...)
     
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  47.  6
    Nancy Berlinger, Pauline W. Chen, Rebecca Dresser, Nancy Neveloff Dubler, Anne Lederman Flamm, Susan Gilbert, Mark A. Hall & Lisa H. Harris (forthcoming). Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong is Asso. Hastings Center Report.
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  48. Tuomas E. Tahko (2016). Armstrong on Truthmaking and Realism. In Francesco F. Calemi (ed.), Metaphysics and Scientific Realism: Essays in Honour of David Malet Armstrong. De Gruyter 207-218.
    The title of this paper reflects the fact truthmaking is quite frequently considered to be expressive of realism. What this means, exactly, will become clearer in the course of our discussion, but since we are interested in Armstrong’s work on truthmaking in particular, it is natural to start from a brief discussion of how truthmaking and realism appear to be associated in his work. In this paper, special attention is given to the supposed link between truthmaking and (...), but it is argued that this link should not be taken too seriously, as truthmaking turns out to be, to a large extent, ontologically neutral. Some consequences of this are studies. (shrink)
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  49.  64
    Benjamin Libet, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.) (2010). Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oxford University Press.
    Benjamin Libet, Do we have free will? -- Adina L. Roskies, Why Libet's studies don't pose a threat to free will? -- Alfred r. mele, libet on free will : readiness potentials, decisions, and awareness? -- Susan Pockett and Suzanne Purdy, Are voluntary movements initiated preconsciously? : the relationships between readiness potentials, urges, and decisions? -- William P. Banks and Eve A. Isham, Do we really know what we are doing? : implications of reported time of decision for theories (...)
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  50.  2
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.) (2007). Moral Psychology: The Evolution of Morality: Adaptations and Innateness. A Bradford Book.
    For much of the twentieth century, philosophy and science went their separate ways. In moral philosophy, fear of the so-called naturalistic fallacy kept moral philosophers from incorporating developments in biology and psychology. Since the 1990s, however, many philosophers have drawn on recent advances in cognitive psychology, brain science, and evolutionary psychology to inform their work. This collaborative trend is especially strong in moral philosophy, and these volumes bring together some of the most innovative work by both philosophers and psychologists in (...)
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