Search results for 'Susan Armstrong-Buck' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. D. M. Armstrong (1978). On Passing the Buck. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):346.score: 360.0
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  2. Susan Armstrong (2006). For Love of Matter: A Contemporary Panpsychism. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):99-102.score: 240.0
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  3. Susan J. Armstrong (1991). Individuality and Cooperative Action. Process Studies 20 (4):248-252.score: 240.0
  4. Susan Armstrong (2002). Advanced Technology and Process Philosophy. Process Studies 31 (1):101-129.score: 240.0
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  5. Susan J. Armstrong (1999). Being and Value: Toward a Constructive Postmodern Metaphysics. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):425-428.score: 240.0
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  6. Susan J. Armstrong (2010). Ecological Ethics and the Human Soul. Environmental Ethics 32 (1):99-102.score: 240.0
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  7. Susan Armstrong (2007). The Ethics of Creativity: Beauty, Morality, and a Processive Cosmos. Environmental Ethics 29 (2):209-212.score: 240.0
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  8. John Abromeit, Mark W. Cobb, Lilian Alweiss, Susan J. Armstrong, Richard G. Botzler, Ronald Aronson, Robin Attfield, Gordon Baker, Katherine Morris & Etienne Balibar (unknown). The Following Books Have Been Received and Are Available for Review. Please Contact the Reviews Editor: Jim. Oshea@ Ucd. Ie. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):517 - 523.score: 240.0
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  9. Susan J. Armstrong (2013). Leslie Paul Thiele: Indra's Net and the Midas Touch: Sustainability in a Connected World. Environmental Ethics 35 (2):255-256.score: 240.0
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  10. Susan Armstrong & Richard G. Botzler (eds.) (2003). Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 240.0
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, carefully presenting (...)
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  11. Susan Armstrong (2008). For Love of Matter. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):99-102.score: 240.0
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  12. Susan J. Armstrong (1992). In Praise of Pigs. Between the Species 8 (1):8.score: 240.0
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  13. Susan J. Armstrong (2009). Moral Habitat. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):109-110.score: 240.0
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  14. Susan Armstrong (2002). Review of “Utopias, Dolphins and Computers: Problems of Philosophical Plumbing”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 3 (2):16.score: 240.0
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  15. Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.) (2008). The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 240.0
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, carefully presenting (...)
     
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  16. Susan J. Armstrong (2008). The Ethics of Creativity. Environmental Ethics 29 (2):209-212.score: 240.0
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  17. Susan J. Buck (1999). Multiple-Use Commons, Collective Action, and Platforms for Resource Use Negotiation. Agriculture and Human Values 16 (3):237-239.score: 240.0
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  18. Brian V. Ford-Lloyd, Markus Schmidt, Susan J. Armstrong, Oz Barazani, Jan Engels, Rivka Hadas, Karl Hammer, Shelagh P. Kell, Dingming Kang & Korous Khoshbakht (2011). Crop Wild Relatives—Undervalued, Underutilized and Under Threat? BioScience 61 (7):559-565.score: 240.0
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  19. D. M. Armstrong, John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.) (1993). Ontology, Causality, and Mind: Essays in Honor of D.M. Armstrong. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    D.M. Armstrong is an eminent Australian philosopher whose work over many years has dealt with such subjects as: the nature of possibility, concepts of the particular and the general, causes and laws of nature, and the nature of human consciousness. This collection of essays, all specially written for this volume, explore the many facets of Armstrong's work, concentrating on his more recent interests. There are four sections to the book: possibility and identity, universals, laws and causality, philosophy of mind. The (...)
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  20. A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.) (1981). Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications.score: 180.0
     
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  21. D. M. Armstrong (1996). Place and Armstrong's Views Compared. In Tim Crane (ed.), Dispositions: A Debate. New York: Routledge. 33--48.score: 180.0
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  22. Ross Buck (1986). A Psychologist's Reply Ross Buck LeDoux and I Clearly Agree That Psychologists Studying Emotion Must Be Aware of the Work of Neuroscientists to Provide a Framework for Their Ideas, and That Psychological Theory and Research May Provide Leads for Neuroscientists. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Mind and Brain. Methuen. 359.score: 180.0
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  23. P. Simons, S. Mumford & D. Armstrong (2005). Critical Discussion of David Armstrong, Truth and Truthmakers. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):253.score: 180.0
     
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  24. John M. Armstrong (2001). Review of Stephen Everson, Ed., Ethics, Companions to Ancient Thought 4 (Cambridge University Press, 1998). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):237–245.score: 120.0
    I review this fine collection of articles on ancient ethics ranging from the Presocratics to Sextus Empiricus. Eight of the nine chapters are published here for the first time. Contributors include Charles H. Kahn on "Pre-Platonic Ethics," C. C. W. Taylor on "Platonic Ethics," Stephen Everson on "Aristotle on Nature and Value," John McDowell on "Some Issues in Aristotle's Moral Psychology," David Sedley on "The Inferential Foundations of Epicurean Ethics," T. H. Irwin on "Socratic Paradox and Stoic Theory," Julia Annas (...)
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  25. L. J. Ray (1982). Book Reviews : The Origin of Negative Dialectics, Theodore W. Adorno, Walter Benjamin, and the Frankfurt Institute. By Susan Buck-Morss. Brighton: Harvester Press, 1977. Pp. Xv + 335. 10.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 12 (3):340-345.score: 120.0
  26. Kevin M. Clark (1982). The Origin of Negative Dialectics: Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, and the Frankfurt Institute, by Susan Buck-Morss;the Melancholy Science: An Introduction to the Thought of Theodor W. Adorno, by Gillian Rose. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 8 (1/2):269-305.score: 120.0
  27. Y. Winter (2007). Critical Theory, the War on Terror, and the Limits of Civilization: Holy Terror, by Terry Eagleton. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 160 Pp. $22 (Cloth). Thinking Past Terror: Islamism and Critical Theory on the Left, by Susan Buck-Morss. London: Verso, 2003. 160 Pp. $22 (Cloth). Defending Ideals: War, Democracy and Political Struggles, by Drucilla Cornell. New York: Routledge, 2004. 256 Pp. $25.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Political Theory 35 (2):207-214.score: 120.0
  28. Nicholas Xenos (1991). Susan Buck-Morss, The Dialects of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (3):159-161.score: 120.0
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  29. Roger Chao (2009). Susan J. Armstrong and Richard G. Botzler (Eds.): The Animal Ethics Reader, 2nd Edition. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):399-400.score: 120.0
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  30. Roger Chao (2009). Susan J. Armstrong and Richard G. Botzler (Eds.): The Animal Ethics Reader. Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):399-400.score: 120.0
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  31. Willi Bolle, Elvis Cesar Bonassa & Fernanda Pitta (1997). Utopia e engajamento (Entrevista com Susan Buck-Morss). Cadernos de Filosofia Alemã 3.score: 120.0
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  32. Victorian Britain (2008). Allen, Barry. Artifice and Design: Art and Technology in Human Experience. Cornell University Press. 2008. Pp. 213. Armstrong, Susan J. And Richard G. Botzler. The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge. 2008. Pp. 588.£ 18.99. Badiou, Alain. Numbers and Numbers. Polity. 2008. Pp. 240.£ 16.99,£ 50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 83.score: 120.0
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  33. David M. Armstrong (1959). Mr Arthadeva and Naive Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 37 (May):67-70.score: 90.0
  34. David M. Armstrong (1963). Max Deutscher and Perception. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (August):246-249.score: 90.0
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  35. David M. Armstrong (1964). Vesey on Bodily Sensations. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42 (August):247-248.score: 90.0
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  36. David M. Armstrong (1963). Vesey on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (December):359-362.score: 90.0
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  37. Susan Armstrong-Buck (1986). Whitehead's Metaphysical System as a Foundation for Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 8 (3):241-259.score: 87.0
    Environmental ethics would greatly benefit from an adequate metaphysical foundation. In an attempt to demonstrate the value of Whitehead’s metaphysical system as such a foundation, I first discuss five central tenets of his thought. I then compare aspects of his philosophy with Peter Singer’s utilitarianism, Tom Regan’s rights theory, Aldo Leopold’s land ethic, and Spinoza's system in order to indicate how aWhiteheadian approach can solve the difficulties of the other views as currently developed, and provide the basis for an environmental (...)
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  38. Susan Armstrong-Buck (1989). Nonhuman Experience. Process Studies 18 (1):1-18.score: 87.0
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  39. David M. Armstrong (1968). A Materialist Theory of the Mind. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This classic work of recent philosophy was first published in 1968, and remains the most compelling and comprehensive statement of the view that the mind is material or physical. In A Materialist Theory of the Mind , D. M. Armstrong provided insight into the debate surrounding the relationship of the mind and body. He put forth a detailed materialist account of all the main mental phenomena, including perception, sensation, belief, the will, introspection, mental images, and consciousness. This causal analysis of (...)
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  40. David M. Armstrong (1993). Reply to Campbell. In John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality and Mind: Essays in Honour of D M Armstrong. New York: Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  41. David M. Armstrong (1993). Reply to Jackson's "Block's Challenge". In John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality and Mind: Essays in Honour of D.M. Armstrong. New York: Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  42. Susan Buck-Morss (2009). Hegel, Haiti and Universal History. University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 48.0
    In this path-breaking work, Susan Buck-Morss draws new connections between history, inequality, social conflict, and human emancipation.
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  43. Susan Schneider (2001). Alien Individuals, Alien Universals, and Armstrong's Combinatorial Theory of Possibility. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):575-593.score: 42.0
    Armstrong's combinatorialism, in his own words, is the following project: "My central metaphysical hypothesis is that all there is is the world of space and time. It is this world which is to supply the actual elements for the totality of combinations. So what is proposed is a Naturalistic form of a combinatorial theory."2 Armstrong calls his central hypothesis "Naturalism." He intends his well−known theory of universals to satisfy this thesis. He now attempts to give a naturalistic theory of modality.
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  44. Nancy Berlinger, Pauline W. Chen, Rebecca Dresser, Nancy Neveloff Dubler, Anne Lederman Flamm, Susan Gilbert, Mark A. Hall & Lisa H. Harris (forthcoming). Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong is Asso. Hastings Center Report.score: 36.0
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  45. Benjamin Libet, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.) (2010). Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Benjamin Libet, Do we have free will? -- Adina L. Roskies, Why Libet's studies don't pose a threat to free will? -- Alfred r. mele, libet on free will : readiness potentials, decisions, and awareness? -- Susan Pockett and Suzanne Purdy, Are voluntary movements initiated preconsciously? : the relationships between readiness potentials, urges, and decisions? -- William P. Banks and Eve A. Isham, Do we really know what we are doing? : implications of reported time of decision for theories (...)
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  46. Susan Jane Buck Cox (1985). No Tragedy of the Commons. Environmental Ethics 7 (1):49-61.score: 28.0
    The historical antecedents of Garrett Hardin’s “tragedy ofthe commons” are generally understood to lie in the common grazing lands of medieval and post-medieval England. The concept of the commons current in medieval England is significantly different from the modem concept; the English common was not available to the general public but rather only to certain individuals who inherited or were granted the right to use it, and use ofthe common even by these people was not unregulated. The types and in (...)
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  47. Cornelis de Waal (2007). Susan Haack a Complete Bibliography. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.score: 27.0
    In this volume comprised of sixteen essays and rebuttals, author and professor of philosophy Susan Haack responds to her fellow philosophers and her critics on a wide range of topics that involve much more than the esoteric nature of contemporary philosophy. Instead, as is Haack's forte, she asserts her views on important current issues such as how scientists conduct their work, the ethics of affirmative action and the pitfalls of preferential hiring, and how the distorted reality the postmodern thinkers (...)
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  48. Andrew Reisner (2009). Abandoning the Buck Passing Analysis of Final Value. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):379 - 395.score: 24.0
    In this paper it is argued that the buck-passing analysis (BPA) of final value is not a plausible analysis of value and should be abandoned. While considering the influential wrong kind of reason problem and other more recent technical objections, this paper contends that there are broader reasons for giving up on buck-passing. It is argued that the BPA, even if it can respond to the various technical objections, is not an attractive analysis of final value. It is not attractive (...)
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  49. Jonathan Smith (2010). On Sinnott-Armstrong's Case Against Moral Intuitionism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):75 - 88.score: 24.0
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong has argued against moral intuitionism, according to which some of our moral beliefs are justified without needing to be inferred from any other beliefs. He claims that any prima facie justification some non-inferred moral beliefs might have enjoyed is removed because many of our moral beliefs are formed in circumstances where either (1) we are partial, (2) others disagree with us and there is no reason to prefer our moral judgement to theirs, (3) we are emotional in a (...)
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  50. Jussi Suikkanen (2005). Reasons and Value – in Defence of the Buck-Passing Account. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (5):513 - 535.score: 24.0
    In this article, I will defend the so-called buck-passing theory of value. According to this theory, claims about the value of an object refer to the reason-providing properties of the object. The concept of value can thus be analyzed in terms of reasons and the properties of objects that provide them for us. Reasons in this context are considerations that count in favour of certain attitudes. There are four other possibilities of how the connection between reasons and value might be (...)
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