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Susan E. Babbitt [12]Susan Babbitt [7]
  1. Susan E. Babbitt (2013). Humanism and Embodiment: Remarks on Cause and Effect. Hypatia 28 (4):733-748.
    I understand humanism to be the meta-ethical view that there exist discoverable (nonmoral) truths about the human condition, that is, about what it means to be human. We might think that as long as I believe I am realizing my unique human potential, I cannot be reasonably contradicted. Yet when we consider systemic oppression, this is unlikely. Systemic oppression makes dehumanizing conditions and treatment seem reasonable. In this paper, I consider the nature of understanding—drawing in particular upon recent defenses of (...)
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  2. Susan E. Babbitt (2009). Collective Memory or Knowledge of the Past : "Covering Reality with Flowers". In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  3. Susan Babbitt (2006). Book Review: Shari Stone-Mediatore. Reading Across Borders: Storytelling and Knowledges of Resistance. Newyork: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. [REVIEW] Hypatia 21 (3):203-206.
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  4. Susan E. Babbitt (2006). Reading Across Borders: Storytelling and Knowledges of Resistance (Review). Hypatia 21 (3):203-206.
  5. Susan E. Babbitt (2005). Reasons, Explanation, and Saramago's Bell. Hypatia 20 (4):144-163.
    : In this essay, I suggest that significant insights of recent feminist philosophy lead, among other things, to the thought that it is not always better to choose than to be compelled to do what one might have done otherwise. However, few feminists, if any, would defend such a suggestion. I ask why it is difficult to consider certain ideas that, while challenging in theory, are, nonetheless, rather unproblematic in practice. I suggest that some questions are not pursued seriously enough (...)
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  6. Susan E. Babbitt (2005). Stories From the South: A Question of Logic. Hypatia 20 (3):1-21.
    : In this paper, I argue that stories about difference do not promote critical self and social understanding; rather, on the contrary, it is the way we understand ourselves that makes some stories relevantly different. I discuss the uncritical reception of a story about homosexuality in Cuba, urging attention to generalizations explaining judgments of importance. I suggest that some stories from the South will never be relevant to discussions about human flourishing until we critically examine ideas about freedom and democracy, (...)
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  7. Susan Babbitt (2003). Book Review: Martine Watson Brown Ley and Allison B. Kimmich. Women and Autobiography. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):215-218.
  8. Susan E. Babbitt (2003). Women and Autobiography (Review). Hypatia 18 (3):215-218.
  9. Susan Babbitt (2001). Book Review: Jerilyn Fisher and Ellen S. Silber. Analyzing the Different Voice: Feminist Psychological Theory and Literary Texts. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (1):91-94.
  10. Susan E. Babbitt (2001). Analyzing the Different Voice: Feminist Psychological Theory and Literary Texts (Review). Hypatia 16 (1):91-94.
  11. Susan Babbitt (2000). Moral Naturalism and the Normative Question. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (Supplement):139-173.
    (2000). Moral Naturalism and the Normative Question. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 30, Supplementary Volume 26: Moral Epistemology Naturalized, pp. 139-173.
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  12. Susan E. Babbitt (2000). Artless Integrity: Moral Imagination, Agency, and Stories. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  13. Susan Babbitt (1999). Moral Risk and Dark Waters. In Susan E. Babbitt & Sue Campbell (eds.), Racism and Philosophy. Cornell University Press. 235--54.
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  14. Susan E. Babbitt & Sue Campbell (eds.) (1999). Racism and Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
    By definitively establishing that racism has broad implications for how the entire field of philosophy is practiced -- and by whom -- this powerful and ...
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  15. Susan Babbitt (1997). The Construction of Social Reality. Philosophical Review 106 (4):608-609.
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  16. Susan E. Babbitt (1996). Impossible Dreams: Rationality, Integrity, and Moral Imagination. Westview Press.
    Conventional wisdom and commonsense morality tend to take the integrity of persons for granted. But for people in systematically unjust societies, self-respect and human dignity may prove to be impossible dreams.Susan Babbitt explores the implications of this insight, arguing that in the face of systemic injustice, individual and social rationality may require the transformation rather than the realization of deep-seated aims, interests, and values. In particular, under such conditions, she argues, the cultivation and ongoing exercise of moral imagination is necessary (...)
     
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  17. Susan E. Babbitt (1995). Political Philosophy and the Challenge of the Personal: From Narcissism to Radical Critique. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 77 (2-3):293 - 318.
  18. Susan E. Babbitt (1994). Identity, Knowledge, and Toni Morrison's "Beloved": Questions About Understanding Racism. Hypatia 9 (3):1 - 18.
    In discussing Drucilla Cornell's remarks about Toni Morrison's Beloved, I consider epistemological questions raised by the acquiring of understanding of racism, particularly the deep-rooted racism embodied in social norms and values. I suggest that questions about understanding racism are, in part, questions about personal and political identities and that questions about personal and political identities are often, importantly, epistemological questions.
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  19. Susan Babbitt (1993). Feminism and Objective Interests: The Role of Transformation Experiences in Rational Deliberation. In Linda Alcoff & Elizabeth Potter (eds.), Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge. 245--265.
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