Search results for 'Susan Greenwood' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark A. Schroll & Susan Greenwood (2011). Worldviews in Collision/Worldviews in Metamorphosis: Toward a Multistate Paradigm. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):49-60.score: 540.0
    This article is an extended commentary inspired by Alan Drengson's paper “Shifting Paradigms: From Technocrat to Planetary Person” (Drengson 2011). In this article Susan Greenwood and I echo Drengson's criticism that Euro-American science is incomplete, having committed what Thomas Roberts calls “The Singlestate Fallacy: the erroneous assumption that all worthwhile abilities reside in our normal, awake mindbody state” (Roberts 2006:105). This singlestate fallacy is vividly portrayed in Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein, whose critique of Euro-American science is revisited in (...)
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  2. Susan Greenwood (2013). 11 On Becoming an Owl Magical Consciousness. In Geoffrey Samuel & Jay Johnston (eds.), Religion and the Subtle Body in Asia and the West: Between Mind and Body. Routledge. 8--211.score: 240.0
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  3. Hannah Gilbert (2011). The Anthropology of Magic. By Susan Greenwood. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):63-65.score: 90.0
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  4. Jennifer Greenwood (2011). Contingent Transcranialism and Deep Functional Cognitive Integration: The Case of Human Emotional Ontogenesis. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):420-436.score: 60.0
    Contingent transcranialists claim that the physical mechanisms of mind are not exclusively intracranial and that genuine cognitive systems can extend into cognizers' physical and socio-cultural environments. They further claim that extended cognitive systems must include the deep functional integration of external environmental resources with internal neural resources. They have found it difficult, however, to explicate the precise nature of such deep functional integration and provide compelling examples of it. Contingent intracranialists deny that extracranial resources can be components of genuine extended (...)
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  5. John D. Greenwood (1997). Placebo Control Treatments and the Evaluation of Psychotherapy: A Reply to Grunbaum and Erwin. Philosophy of Science 64 (3):497-510.score: 60.0
    In this paper, I respond to some criticisms of Greenwood (1996) advanced by Grunbaum (1996) and Erwin (1996). I argue that Grunbaum's problematic account of "placebo effects" and placebo control treatments does not really address, far less resolve, the problems with experimental evaluations of psychotherapy documented in my original paper.
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  6. Michelle Greenwood (2013). Ethical Analyses of HRM: A Review and Research Agenda. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):355-366.score: 60.0
    The very idea of human resource management raises ethical considerations: What does it mean to us as humans for human beings to be managed as resources? Intriguingly, the field of ethics and HRM remains underdeveloped. Current approaches to HRM fail to place ethical considerations as their central warrant. This article, building on Greenwood (J Bus Ethics 36(3):261–279, 2002), argues for a deeper analysis of ethical issues in HRM, indeed for a differentiated ethical perspective of HRM that sets normative deliberations (...)
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  7. Michelle R. Greenwood (2002). Ethics and HRM: A Review and Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):261 - 278.score: 30.0
    This paper reviews and develops the ethical analysis of human resource management (HRM). Initially, the ethical perspective of HRM is differentiated from the "mainstrea" and critical perspectives of HRM. To date, the ethical analysis of HRM has taken one of two forms: the application Kantian and utilitarian ethical theories to the gestalt of HRM, and the application of theories of justice and fairness to specific HRM practices. This paper is concerned with the former, the ethical analysis of HRM in its (...)
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  8. John D. Greenwood (1990). Two Dogmas of Neo-Empiricism: The "Theory-Informity" of Observation and the Quine-Duhem Thesis. Philosophy of Science 57 (4):553-574.score: 30.0
    It is argued that neither the "theory-informity" of observations nor the Quine-Duhem thesis pose any in principle threat to the objectivity of theory evaluation. The employment of exploratory theories does not generate incommensurability, but on the contrary is responsible for the mensurability and commensurability of explanatory theories, since exploratory theories enable scientists to make observations which are critical in the evaluation of explanatory theories. The employment of exploratory theories and other auxiliary hypotheses does not enable a theory to always accommodate (...)
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  9. Terence Greenwood (1967). Personal Identity and Memory. Philosophical Quarterly 17 (October):334-344.score: 30.0
  10. John D. Greenwood (1992). Against Eliminative Materialism: From Folk Psychology to Volkerpsychologie. Philosophical Psychology 5 (4):349-68.score: 30.0
    In this paper it is argued that we would not be logically obliged or rationally inclined to reject the ontology of contentful psychological states postulated by folk psychology even if the explanations advanced by folk psychology turned out to be generally inaccurate or inadequate. Moreover, it is argued that eliminativists such as Paul Churchland do not establish that folk psychological explanations are, or are likely to prove, generally inaccurate or inadequate. Most of Churchland's arguments—based upon developments within connectionist neuroscience—only cast (...)
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  11. Harry J. Van Buren & Michelle Greenwood (2008). Enhancing Employee Voice: Are Voluntary Employer–Employee Partnerships Enough? Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):209-221.score: 30.0
    One of the essential ethical issues in the employment relationship is the loss of employee voice. Many of the ways employees have previously exercised voice in the employment relationship have been rendered less effective by (1) the changing nature of work, (2) employer preferences for flexibility that often work to the disadvantage of employees, and (3) changes in public policy and institutional systems that have failed to protect workers. We will begin with a discussion of how work has changed in (...)
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  12. John D. Greenwood (ed.) (1991). The Future of Folk Psychology: Intentionality and Cognitive Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    The essays in this volume are concerned with our everyday and developed scientific systems of explanation of human behavior in terms of beliefs, attitudes,...
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  13. John D. Greenwood (1993). Split Brains and Singular Personhood. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):285-306.score: 30.0
    In this paper it is argued that the experimental data on commissurotomy patients provide no grounds for denying the singular personhood of commissurotomy patients. This is because, contrary to most philosophical accounts, there is no “unity of consciousness” discriminating condition for singular personhood that is violated in the case of commissurotomy patients, and because no contradictions arise when singular personhood is ascribed to commissurotomy patients.
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  14. John D. Greenwood (2007). Unnatural Epistemology. Mind and Language 22 (2):132-149.score: 30.0
    ‘Naturalized’ philosophers of mind regularly appeal to the empirical psychological literature in support of the ‘theory-theory’ account of the natural epistemology of mental state ascription (to self and others). It is argued that such appeals are not philosophically neutral, but in fact presuppose the theory-theory account of mental state ascription. It is suggested that a possible explanation of the popularity of the theory-theory account is that it is generally assumed that alternative accounts in terms of introspection (and simulation) presuppose a (...)
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  15. John D. GreenwooD (1994). A Sense of Identity: Prolegomena to a Social Theory of Personal Identity. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (1):25–46.score: 30.0
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  16. John D. Greenwood (2004). What Happened to the "Social" in Social Psychology? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (1):19–34.score: 30.0
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  17. John D. Greenwood (1999). Simulation, Theory-Theory and Cognitive Penetration: No 'Instance of the Fingerpost'. Mind and Language 14 (1):32-56.score: 30.0
  18. John D. Greenwood (1999). From Volkerpsychologie to Cultural Psychology: The Once and Future Discipline? Philosophical Psychology 12 (4):503 – 514.score: 30.0
    Despite the current enthusiasm for cultural psychology, its disciplinary identity remains problematic. In this essay, the question of the identity of cultural psychology is pressed with respect to the vision promoted in Michael Cole's Cultural Psychology: The Once and Future Discipline. Cole advocates a form of psychology that is sensitive to cultural and historical context, and which purports to reinstate the program of Wundt's Volkerpsychologie and the historical-cultural psychology of Vygotsky and Luria. Unfortunately, Cole's account manifests the same tensions and (...)
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  19. John D. Greenwood (1982). On the Relation Between Laboratory Experiments and Social Behaviour: Causal Explanation and Generalization. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 12 (3):225–250.score: 30.0
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  20. John D. Greenwood (1991). Self-Knowledge: Looking in the Wrong Direction. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (2):35-47.score: 30.0
  21. John D. Greenwood (1988). On the Social Psychology of Therapy Evaluation: Control Treatments and the Natural Negotiation Hypothesis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (4):373–389.score: 30.0
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  22. John D. Greenwood (1987). Scientific Psychology and Hermeneutical Psychology: Causal Explanation and the Meaning of Human Action. [REVIEW] Human Studies 10 (2):171 - 204.score: 30.0
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  23. Michelle Greenwood (2000). The Study of Business Ethics: A Case for Dr Seuss. Business Ethics 9 (3):155–162.score: 30.0
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  24. Davydd J. Greenwood (2003). Social Capital: Papers Selected From a Critical Workshop. Social Epistemology 17 (4):325 – 327.score: 30.0
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  25. John D. Greenwood (1988). Agency, Causality, and Meaning. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (1):95–115.score: 30.0
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  26. Thomas Greenwood (1922). Einstein and Idealism. Mind 31 (122):205-207.score: 30.0
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  27. John D. Greenwood (1996). Freud's 'Tally' Argument, Placebo Control Treatments, and the Evaluation of Psychotherapy. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):605-621.score: 30.0
    In this paper it is suggested that Freud's 'tally argument' (Grunbaum 1984) is not best interpreted as a risky claim concerning the efficacy of psychoanalytic therapy, but as a risky claim concerning the implications of theoretical psychoanalytic explanations of the efficacy of psychoanalytic therapy. Despite the fact that Freud never empirically established that these implications hold, the 'tally argument' does draw attention to a critical distinction that is too often neglected in contemporary empirical studies of psychoanalysis and other forms of (...)
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  28. Godfrey H. Thomson, H. Barker, S. V. Keeling, F. C. S. Schiller, T. Whittaker, O. de Selincourt, Thomas Greenwood & L. Roth (1927). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 36 (143):371-387.score: 30.0
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  29. John D. Greenwood (1991). Reasons to Believe. In , The Future of Folk Psychology. Cambridge University Press. 70.score: 30.0
  30. Cornelis de Waal (2007). Susan Haack a Complete Bibliography. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.score: 21.0
    In this volume comprised of sixteen essays and rebuttals, author and professor of philosophy Susan Haack responds to her fellow philosophers and her critics on a wide range of topics that involve much more than the esoteric nature of contemporary philosophy. Instead, as is Haack's forte, she asserts her views on important current issues such as how scientists conduct their work, the ethics of affirmative action and the pitfalls of preferential hiring, and how the distorted reality the postmodern thinkers (...)
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  31. Christine E. Gudorf (2004). Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.score: 18.0
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief treatment (...)
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  32. Susan Hurley (2001). Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.score: 15.0
    [Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether it (...)
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  33. James Cargile (1996). Evidence and Inquiry by Susan Haack. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (3):621-625.score: 15.0
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  34. Max Black (1981). Philosophy of Logics By Susan Haack Cambridge University Press, 1978, Xvi + 276 Pp., £13.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 56 (217):435-.score: 15.0
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  35. Susan E. Bernick (1992). Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo. Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.score: 15.0
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  36. Robert Klee (1992). In Defense of the Quine-Duhem Thesis: A Reply to Greenwood. Philosophy of Science 59 (3):487-491.score: 12.0
    While discussing the work of Kuhn and Hanson, John Greenwood (1990) misidentifies the nature of the relationship between the incommensurability of theories and the theory-ladenness of observation. After pointing out this error, I move on to consider Greenwood's main argument that the Quine-Duhem thesis suffers from a form of epistemological self-defeat if it is interpreted to mean that any recalcitrant observation can always be accommodated to any theory. Greenwood finds this interpretation implausible because some adjustments to auxiliary (...)
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  37. Nikolay Milkov (2003). Susan Stebbing's Criticism of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 10:351-63.score: 12.0
    Susan Stebbing’s paper “Logical Positivism and Analysis” (March 1933) was unusually critical of Wittgenstein. It put up a sharp opposition between Cambridge analytic philosophy of Moore and Russell and the positivist philosophy of the Vienna Circle to which she included Wittgenstein from 1929–32. Above all, positivists were interested in analyzing language, analytic philosophers in analyzing facts. Moreover, whereas analytic philosophers were engaged in directional analysis which seeks to illuminate the multiplicity of the analyzed facts, positivists aimed at final analysis (...)
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  38. Simon Derpmann (2012). Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why It Matters. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):421-422.score: 12.0
    Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why it Matters Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10677-011-9321-8 Authors Simon Derpmann, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Philosophisches Seminar, Domplatz 23, 48143 Münster, Germany Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  39. Axel Cleeremans & Erik Myin (1999). A Short Review of Consciousness in Action by Susan Hurley. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:455-458.score: 12.0
    Consider Susan Hurley's depiction of mainstream views of the mind: "The mind is a kind of sandwich, and cognition is the filling" (p. 401). This particular sandwich (with perception as the bottom loaf and action as the top loaf) tastes foul to Hurley, who devotes most of "Consciousness in Action" to a systematic and sometimes extraordinarily detailed critique of what has otherwise been dubbed "classical" models of the mind. This critique then provides the basis for her alternative proposal, in (...)
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  40. H. G. Callaway (2000). Review: Susan Haack, Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate, Unfashionable Essays. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 53 (3):407-414.score: 12.0
    Susan Haack presents a striking and appealing figure in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. In spite of British birth and education, she appears to bridge the gap between analytic philosophy and American pragmatism, with its more diverse influences and sources. Well known for her writings in the philosophy of logic and epistemology, she fuses something of the hard-headed debunking style of a Bertrand Russell with a lively interest in Peirce, James and Dewey.
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  41. Susan Haack (2000). Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate. University of Chicago Press.score: 12.0
    Forthright and wryly humorous, philosopher Susan Haack deploys her penetrating analytic skills on some of the most highly charged cultural and social debates of recent years. Relativism, multiculturalism, feminism, affirmative action, pragmatisms old and new, science, literature, the future of the academy and of philosophy itself—all come under her keen scrutiny in Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate.
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  42. Susan Wendell (1994). No Longer Patient: Feminist Ethics and Health Care Susan Sherwin Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992, Xi + 286 Pp., US$39.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 33 (04):783-.score: 12.0
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  43. Debra Satz & Rob Reich (eds.) (2009). Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. OUP USA.score: 12.0
    The late Susan Moller Okin was a leading political theorist whose scholarship integrated political philosophy and issues of gender, the family, and culture. Okin argued that liberalism, properly understood as a theory opposed to social hierarchies and supportive of individual freedom and equality, provided the tools for criticizing the substantial and systematic inequalities between men and women. Her thought was deeply informed by a feminist view that theories of justice must apply equally to women as men, and she was (...)
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  44. Marc Champagne (2012). One's a Crowd? On Greenwood's Delimitation of the Social. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (4):0048393112454335.score: 12.0
    In an effort to carve a distinct place for social facts without lapsing into a holistic ontology, John Greenwood has sought to define social phenomena solely in terms of the attitudes held by the actor(s) in question. I argue that his proposal allows for the possibility of a “lone collectivity” that is (1) unpalatable in its own right and (2) incompatible with the claim that sociology is autonomous from psychology. As such, I conclude that the relevant beliefs need to (...)
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  45. Peter King, A Note on Susan James.score: 12.0
    Susan James, in her recent work Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy (Oxford: Clarendon 1997), prefaces her investigation of emotions in the seventeenth century with a series of remarks about the earlier career of the emotions, in particular their treatment in the Middle Ages. In brief, she takes the ‘new’ analyses of the passions put forward in the seventeenth century to be a philosophical sideshow to the main event: the dethronement of Aristotelian natural philosophy and metaphysics (22). (...)
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  46. Edward Erwin (1996). The Evaluation of Psychotherapy: A Reply to Greenwood. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):642-651.score: 12.0
    John Greenwood (this issue) claims that neglect of an important methodological distinction has contributed directly to the "epistemic impoverishment" of empirical studies of all forms of professional psychotherapy. I challenge this claim, as well as other important claims he makes about the efficacy of psychoanalysis and other forms of psychotherapy.
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  47. Anthony Chemero & William Cordeiro, "Dynamical, Ecological Sub-Persons" Commentary on Susan HurleyÂ's Consciousness in Action.score: 12.0
    In a way that is rarely even attempted, and even more rarely actually pulled off, Susan Hurley, in her book Consciousness in Action, brings scientific ideas into contact with mainstream philosophy. It is not at all unusual for empirical results from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience to be raised in discussion of issues in philosophy of science and philosophy of mind--Dennett and the Churchlands, for example, have been doing so for years. But Hurley attempts to draw empirical results even (...)
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  48. Adolf Grunbaum (1996). Empirical Evaluations of Theoretical Explanations of Psychotherapeutic Efficacy: A Reply to John D. Greenwood. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):622-641.score: 12.0
    Using Grunbaum 1984 and 1993 as a springboard, Greenwood (this issue) claims to have offered several methodologically salubrious and exegetically illuminating theses on empirical evaluations of theoretical explanations of psychotherapeutic efficacy. According to his exegesis of Grunbaum's construction (1984, Ch. 2, Section C; 1993, 184-204) of Freud's "Tally Argument," that argument bespeaks a rife neglect of the epistemologically-significant distinction between empirical evaluations of the efficacy of psychotherapy and evaluations of theoretical explanations of that efficacy. Greenwood presents a defense (...)
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  49. Susan Haack (2007). Of Chopin and Sycamores : Response to Ryszard Wójcicki. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.score: 12.0
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  50. Mas'ud Zavarzadeh (1985). A Stragegy of Containment: Center and Margin in Desperately Seeking Susan. Telos 1985 (65):136-143.score: 12.0
    In her film, Desperately Seeking Susan, Susan Seidelman continues her inquiry into the relations between the “center” and the “margin” in contemporary culture. The ideology of the film represents the center — the status quo — as the site for mature negotiations of communal values, whereas it constructs the margin — the locus of opposition — as an instance of self-indulgence, transgression, and extremity. This is the same theme in her first film, Smithereens. This fascination with the tension (...)
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