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  1.  237 DLs
    Susan Haack (1976). The Justification of Deduction. Mind 85 (337):112-119.
    It is often taken for granted by writers who propose--and, for that matter, by writers who oppose--'justifications' of inductions, that deduction either does not need, or can readily be provided with, justification. The purpose of this paper is to argue that, contrary to this common opinion, problems analogous to those which, notoriously, arise in the attempt to justify induction, also arise in the attempt to justify deduction.
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  2.  169 DLs
    Susan Haack (1993). Double-Aspect Foundherentism: A New Theory of Empirical Justification. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (1):113-128.
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  3.  130 DLs
    Susan Haack (1976). The Pragmatist Theory of Truth. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):231-249.
  4.  128 DLs
    Susan Haack (1993). The Two Faces of Quine's Naturalism. Synthese 94 (3):335 - 356.
    Quine's naturalized epistemology is ambivalent between a modest naturalism according to which epistemology is an a posteriori discipline, an integral part of the web of empirical belief, and a scientistic naturalism according to which epistemology is to be conducted wholly within the natural sciences. This ambivalence is encouraged by Quine's ambiguous use of science, to mean sometimes, broadly, our presumed empirical knowledge and sometimes, narrowly, the natural sciences. Quine's modest naturalism is reformist, tackling the traditional epistemological problems in a novel (...)
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  5.  106 DLs
    Susan Haack (1992). Science 'From a Feminist Perspective'. Philosophy 67 (259):5 - 18.
    Women themselves, for the most part, think of themselves as the sensible sex, whose business it is to undo the harm that comes of men's impetuous follies. For my part, I distrust all generalizations about women, favourable and unfavourable, masculine and feminine, ancient and modern; all alike, I should say, result from paucity of experience.
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  6.  87 DLs
    Susan Haack (1982). Dummett's Justification of Deduction. Mind 91 (362):216-239.
  7.  86 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). The Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):20-35.
    "Much truth is spoken, that more may be concealed," wrote Mr. Justice Darling in 1879. Opening with an articulation of the distinction between truth (the concept) and truths (particular true propositions), this paper is largely devoted to: -/- (1) developing an account of the dual meaning of "partially true" - "true-in-part" vs. "part of the truth"; and -/- (2) understanding the reasons for, and the dangers of, the very common tendency to tell only part of the relevant truth.
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  8.  83 DLs
    Susan Haack (2009). Evidence and Inquiry: A Pragmatist Reconstruction of Epistemology. Prometheus Books.
    Introduction -- Foundationalism versus coherentism : a dichotomy disclaimed -- Foundationalism undermined -- Coherentism discomposed -- Foundherentism articulated -- The evidence of the senses : refutations and conjectures -- Naturalism disambiguated -- The evidence against reliabilism -- Revolutionary scientism subverted -- Vulgar pragmatism : an unedifying prospect -- Foundherentism ratified -- Selected essays -- "Know" is just a four-letter word -- Knowledge and propaganda : reflections of an old feminist -- "The ethics of belief" reconsidered -- Epistemology legalized : or, (...)
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  9.  76 DLs
    Susan Haack (1996). Reflections on Relativism: From Momentous Tautology to Seductive Contradiction. Philosophical Perspectives 10:297--315.
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  10.  75 DLs
    Susan Haack (2007). The Integrity of Science: What It Means, Why It Matters. Contrastes: Revista Interdisciplinar de Filosofía:5-26.
    The many meanings of integrity are distinguished. This paper focuses specifically on how the concept of integrity in the sense of firm adherence to values applies to science qua institution. The most relevant values - the epistemological values of evidence-sharing and respect for evidence - are articulated, and shown to be rooted in the character of the scientific enterprise. This paves the way for an exploration of the circumstances that presently threaten to erode commitment to these core values: an exploration (...)
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  11.  74 DLs
    Susan Haack (1987). Realism. Synthese 73 (2):275 - 299.
    Realism is multiply ambiguous. The central concern of Part 1 of this paper is to distinguish several of its many senses — four (Theoretical Realism, Cumulative Realism, Progressive Realism and Optimistic Realism) in which it refers to theses about the status of scientific theories, and five (Minimal Realism, Ambitious Absolutism, Transcendentalism, Nidealism, Scholastic Realism) in which it refers to theses about the nature of truth or truth-bearers. Because Realism has these several, largely independent, senses, the conventional wisdom that Tarski's theory (...)
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  12.  73 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). The Legitimacy of Metaphysics. Philosophical Topics 36 (1):97-110.
    Part of Kant’s legacy to Peirce was a lasting conviction that metaphysics is not irredeemable, but can and should be set “on the secure path of a science”. However, Peirce’s “scientific metaphysics”, unlike Kant’s, uses the method of science, i.e., of experience and reasoning; but requires close attention to experience of the most familiar kind rather than the recherché experience needed by the special sciences. This distinctively plausible reconception of what a genuinely scientific metaphysics would be is part of Peirce’s (...)
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  13.  73 DLs
    Susan Haack (1974). On a Theological Argument for Fatalism. Philosophical Quarterly 24 (95):156-159.
    It is the aim of this paper to show that [the theological argument from Divine omniscience] is not more than a needlessly (and confusingly) elaborate version of the argument for fatalism discussed by Aristotle in de Interpretatione 9, which, since its sole premise is the Principle of Bivalence, may conveniently be called the logical argument for fatalism. If this is right, if the theological premisses of the theological argument can be shown to be strictly irrelevant to the fatalist conclusion, then (...)
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  14.  73 DLs
    Susan Haack (1979). Descriptive and Revisionary Metaphysics. Philosophical Studies 35 (4):361 - 371.
  15.  65 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). Of Truth, in Science and in Law. Brooklyn Law Review 73 (2).
    Abstract: This paper responds to the question posed in the announcement of the conference at Brooklyn Law School at which it was presented: if and how [the inquiry into the reliability of proffered scientific testimony mandated by Daubert] relates to 'truth,' and whose view of the truth should prevail. The first step is to sketch the legal history leading up to Daubert, and to explore some of the difficulties Daubert brought in its wake; the next, to develop an account of (...)
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  16.  65 DLs
    Susan Haack (2010). Defending Science - Within Reason. Principia 3 (2):187-212.
    We need to find a middle way between the exaggerated deference towards science characteristic of scientism, and the exaggerated suspicion characteristic of anti-scientific attitudes — to acknowledge that science is neither sacred nor a confidence trick. The Critical Commonsensist account of scientific evidence and scientific method offered here corrects the narrowly logical approach of the Old Deferentialists without succumbing to the New Cynics' sociologism or their factitious despair of the epistemic credentials of science.
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  17.  60 DLs
    Susan Haack (1975). On "on Theological Fatalism Again" Again. Philosophical Quarterly 25 (99):159-161.
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  18.  58 DLs
    R. J. Haack & Susan Haack (1970). Token-Sentences, Translation and Truth-Value. Mind 79 (313):40-57.
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  19.  57 DLs
    Susan Haack (1978). Philosophy of Logics. Cambridge University Press.
    The first systematic exposition of all the central topics in the philosophy of logic, Susan Haack's book has established an international reputation (translated into five languages) for its accessibility, clarity, conciseness, orderliness, and range as well as for its thorough scholarship and careful analyses. Haack discusses the scope and purpose of logic, validity, truth-functions, quantification and ontology, names, descriptions, truth, truth-bearers, the set-theoretical and semantic paradoxes, and modality. She also explores the motivations for a whole range of nonclassical systems of (...)
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  20.  57 DLs
    Susan Haack (2005). On Legal Pragmatism: Where Does 'the Path of the Law' Lead Us? American Journal of Jurisprudence 50 (1):71-105.
    What is called legal pragmatism today is very different from the older style of legal pragmatism traditionally associated with Oliver Wendell Holmes; and there is much that is worthwhile on the conception of the law revealed by reading Holmes's The Path of the Law in the light of the classical pragmatist tradition of Peirce, James, and Dewey. Here, reflections on the varieties of pragmatism - philosophical and legal, old and new - will be wrapped around an exploration of Holmes's legal (...)
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  21.  56 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). After My Own Heart: Dorothy Sayers' Feminism. Think 7 (19):23-33.
    Dorothy Sayers' Gaudy Night, published in 1936, explores still-topical questions about the relation of epistemological and ethical values, and about the place of women in the life of the mind. In her wry reflections on the radical differences between today's feminist philosophy and Sayers' no-nonsense observation that Susan Haack draws both on this detective story and on Sayers' wonderfully brisk essay.
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  22.  56 DLs
    Susan Haack (2009). Irreconcilable Differences? The Troubled Marriage of Science and Law. Law and Contemporary Problems 72 (1).
    Because its business is to resolve disputed issues, the law very often calls on those fields of science where the pressure of commercial interests is most severe. Because the legal system aspires to handle disputes promptly, the scientific questions to which it seeks answers will often be those for which all the evidence is not yet in. Because of its case-specificity, the legal system often demands answers of a kind science is not well-equipped to supply; and, for related reasons, constitutes (...)
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  23.  53 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). The Pluralistic Universe of Law: Towards a Neo-Classical Legal Pragmatism. Ratio Juris 21 (4):453-480.
    After a brief sketch of the history of philosophical pragmatism generally, and of legal pragmatism specifically (section 1), this paper develops a new, neo-classical legal pragmatism: a theory of law drawing in part on Holmes, but also on ideas from the classical pragmatist tradition in philosophy. Main themes are the "pluralistic universe" of law (section 2); the evolution of legal systems (section 3); the place of logic in the law (section 4); and the relation of law and morality (section 5).
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  24.  53 DLs
    Susan Haack (1996). Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond the Formalism. University of Chicago Press.
    Initially proposed as rivals of classical logic, alternative logics have become increasingly important in areas such as computer science and artificial intelligence. Fuzzy logic, in particular, has motivated major technological developments in recent years. Susan Haack's Deviant Logic provided the first extended examination of the philosophical consequences of alternative logics. In this new volume, Haack includes the complete text of Deviant Logic , as well as five additional papers that expand and update it. Two of these essays critique fuzzy logic, (...)
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  25.  53 DLs
    Susan Haack (1976). Is It True What They Say About Tarski? Philosophy 51 (197):323 - 336.
    Popper welcomes Tarski's theory of truth as a vindication of the ‘objective or absolute or correspondence theory of truth’: -/- Tarski's greatest achievement, and the real significance of his theory for the philosophy of the empirical sciences, is that he rehabilitated the correspondence theory of absolute or objective truth … He vindicated the free use of the intuitive idea of truth as correspondence to the facts ….
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  26.  52 DLs
    Susan Haack (2004). Fallibilism, Objectivity, and the New Cynicism. Episteme 1 (1):35-48.
    Nobody seriously doubts the possibility, or the usefulness, of finding things out; that is something we all take for granted when we inquire about our plane schedule, the state of our bank account, the best treatment for our child's illness, and so forth – a presupposition of the most ordinary, everyday looking into things as well as of the most sophisticated scientific research, not to mention of the legal system. Of course, nobody seriously doubts, either, that sometimes, instead of really (...)
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  27.  49 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). Warrant, Causation, and the Atomism of Evidence Law. Episteme 5 (3):pp. 253-265.
    The epistemological analysis offered in this paper reveals that a combination of pieces of evidence, none of them sufficient by itself to warrant a causal conclusion to the legally required degree of proof, may do so jointly. The legal analysis offered here, interlocking with this, reveals that Daubert’s requirement that courts screen each item of scientific expert testimony for reliability can actually impede the process of arriving at the conclusion most warranted by the evidence proffered.
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  28.  48 DLs
    Susan Haack (1982). Theories of Knowledge: An Analytic Framework. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 83:143 - 157.
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  29.  45 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). Proving Causation: The Holism of Warrant and the Atomism of Daubert. Journal of Health and Biomedical Law 4:253-289.
    In many toxic-tort cases - notably in Oxendine v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc, and in Joiner v. G.E., - plaintiffs argue that the expert testimony they wish to present, though no part of it is sufficient by itself to establish causation "by a preponderance of the evidence," is jointly sufficient to meet this standard of proof; and defendants sometimes argue in response that it is a mistake to imagine that a collection of pieces of weak evidence can be any stronger (...)
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  30.  44 DLs
    Susan Haack (1991). The Failure of Feminism. International Studies in Philosophy 23 (1):107-109.
  31.  44 DLs
    Susan Haack (1975). The Relevance of Psychology to Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 6 (2):161–176.
  32.  43 DLs
    Susan Haack, Gerard Radnitzky & Gunnar Andersson (1980). Progress and Rationality in Science. Philosophical Quarterly 30 (119):174.
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  33.  41 DLs
    Susan Haack (1985). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology and Philosophy of Science Edited by S. Harding and M. B. Hintikka Dordrecht: Reidel, 1983, 322 Pp. [REVIEW] Philosophy 60 (232):265-.
  34.  40 DLs
    Susan Haack (1995). Vulgar Pragmatism. In Herman J. Saatkamp (ed.), Rorty & Pragmatism: The Philosopher Responds to His Critics. Vanderbilt University Press 136.
  35.  39 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). Putting Philosophy to Work: Inquiry and its Place in Culture: Essays on Science, Religion, Law, Literature, and Life. Prometheus Books.
    Staying for an answer : the untidy process of groping for truth -- The same, only different -- The unity of truth and the plurality of truths -- Coherence, consistency, cogency, congruity, cohesiveness, &c. : remain calm! don't go overboard! -- Not cynicism, but synechism : lessons from classical pragmatism -- Science, economics, "vision" -- The integrity of science : what it means, why it matters -- Scientific secrecy and "spin" : the sad, sleazy story of the trials of remune (...)
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  36.  39 DLs
    Susan Haack (1997). Prècis of Evidence and Inquiry: Towards Reconstruction in Epistemology. [REVIEW] Synthese 112 (1):7-11.
  37.  38 DLs
    Susan Haack (2004). Science, Economics, 'Vision'. Social Research 71 (2):223-234.
    The focus here is Robert L. Heilbroner's critique, in the last chapter of the 7th edition of The Worldly Philosophers, of the idea that economics is, or should be, scientific. Heilbroner's conception of economics as essentially tied to capitalism is too narrow, and at odds with his own commentary on the rise of pauperism after the English common-land enclosures; and his critique of contemporary economics-as-social science is overdrawn. Nevertheless, there is indeed an important role for the “visionary” economics for which (...)
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  38.  37 DLs
    Susan Haack (2007). On Logic in the Law: "Something, but Not All". Ratio Juris 20 (1):1-31.
    In 1880, when Oliver Wendell Holmes (later to be a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court) criticized the logical theology of law articulated by Christopher Columbus Langdell (the first Dean of Harvard Law School), neither Holmes nor Langdell was aware of the revolution in logic that had begun, the year before, with Frege's Begriffsschrift. But there is an important element of truth in Holmes's insistence that a legal system cannot be adequately understood as a system of axioms and corollaries; and (...)
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  39.  35 DLs
    Susan Haack (2007). The Legitimacy of Metaphysics. Polish Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):97-110.
    Part of Kant’s legacy to Peirce was a lasting conviction that metaphysics is not irredeemable, but can and should be set “on the secure path of a science”. However, Peirce’s “scientific metaphysics”, unlike Kant’s, uses the method of science, i.e., of experience and reasoning; but requires close attention to experience of the most familiar kind rather than the recherché experience needed by the special sciences. This distinctively plausible reconception of what a genuinely scientific metaphysics would be is part of Peirce’s (...)
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  40.  34 DLs
    Susan Haack (2005). Formal Philosophy? A Plea for Pluralism. In John Symonds Vincent Henricks (ed.), Formal Philosophy. 77--98.
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  41.  33 DLs
    Susan Haack (2008). What's Wrong with Litigation-Driven Science? An Essay in Legal Epistemology. Midwest Studies in Philosophy, 32:20-35.
    Rehearing Daubert on remand from the Supreme Court, Judge Kozinski introduced a fifth "Daubert factor" of his own: that expert testimony is based on "litigation-driven science" is an indication that it is unreliable. This article explores the role this factor has played in courts' handling of scientific testimony, clears up an ambiguity in "litigation-driven" and some uncertainties in "reliable," and assesses the reasons courts have given for reading such research with suspicion. This analysis reveals that research that is litigation-driven in (...)
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  42.  33 DLs
    Susan Haack (1979). Fallibilism and Necessity. Synthese 41 (1):37 - 63.
    Part of an early version of this paper was read at the University of Warwick in October 1977, and a later version was read at the Newcastle Royal Institute of Philosophy in November 1977 and at Aberystwyth and Oxford in early 1978. Thanks are due to the many colleagues and friends who made helpful comments on early drafts; special thanks to Hugh Mellor, Rita Nolan and Paul Weiss for detailed written criticisms, and to Don Locke, for very helpful discussions.
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  43.  32 DLs
    Susan Haack (1995). Science is Neither Sacred nor a Confidence Trick. Foundations of Science 1 (3):323-335.
    The Old Deferentialism, taking science to enjoy a privileged epistemic standing because of its uniquely rational and objective method, is over-optimistic. But there is no need to conclude, like the New Cynics, that appeals to evidence, rationality, objectivity are mere rhetorical bullying. A new theory of scientific method and knowledge is developed, which combines logical and social elements, and reveals science to be not epistemologically privileged, but epistemologically distinguished.
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  44.  32 DLs
    Susan Haack (2005). The Ideal of Intellectual Integrity, in Life and Literature. New Literary History 36 (3):359-375.
    A philosophical exploration of the ideal of intellectual integrity drawing on Samuel Butler's semi-autobiographical Bildungsroaman, The Way of All Flesh; and relating this to C.S. Peirce's idea of the scientific attitude and Percy Bridgman's reflections on the conditions needed for this ideal to flourish.
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  45.  31 DLs
    Susan Haack (2007). Peer Review and Publication: Lessons for Lawyers. Stetson Law Review 36 (3).
    Peer review and publication is one of the factors proposed in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. as indicia of the reliability of scientific testimony. This Article traces the origins of the peer-review system, the process by which it became standard at scientific and medical journals, and the many roles it now plays. Additionally, the Author articulates the epistemological rationale for pre-publication peer-review and the inherent limitations of the system as a scientific quality-control mechanism. The Article explores recent changes in (...)
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  46.  31 DLs
    Susan Haack (1977). Analyticity and Logical Truth in The Roots of Reference. Theoria 43 (2):129-143.
  47.  30 DLs
    Susan Haack (2004). Epistemology Legalized: Or, Truth, Justice, and the American Way. American Journal of Jurisprudence 49 (1):43-61.
    Jeremy Bentham's powerful metaphor of Injustice, and her handmaid Falsehood reminds us, if we need reminding, that justice requires not only just laws, and just administration of those laws, but also factual truth - objective factual truth; and that in consequence the very possibility of a just legal system requires that there be objective indications of truth, i.e., objective standards of better or worse evidence... My plan [in this Olin Lecture in Jurisprudence, presented at Notre Dame law School, in October (...)
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  48.  30 DLs
    Susan Haack (1997). Reply to BonJour. Synthese 112 (1):25-35.
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  49.  30 DLs
    Susan Haack (2007). On Real Metaphysics and Real Realism : Response to Cynthia MacDonald. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books
  50.  29 DLs
    Susan Haack (1996). Between Scientism and Conversationalism. Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):455-474.
    Of late, two contrasting departures from the analytic mainstream have become fashionable: the displacement of philosophy by the natural sciences, epitomized by the Churchlands' theme of "neurophilosophy," and the displacement of philosophy by the literary, epitomized by Rorty's theme of philosophy as "just a kind of writing," as "carrying on the conversation" of Western culture. Both are disastrous. My purpose here is to articulate a metaphilosophy which, avoiding both scientism and literary dilettantism, allows a more robustly plausible account of the (...)
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