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Susan Hekman [42]Susan J. Hekman [10]
  1. Susan J. Hekman (2007). Gender and Knowledge: Elements of a Postmodern Feminism. Polity Press.
  2.  7
    Stacy Alaimo & Susan Hekman (eds.) (2008). Material Feminisms. Indiana University Press.
    By insisting on the importance of materiality, this volume breaks new ground in philosophy, feminist theory, cultural studies, science studies, and other fields where the body and nature collide.
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  3.  14
    Susan J. Hekman (1995). Moral Voices, Moral Selves: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Moral Theory. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Using the work of Wittgenstein and Foucault, she outlines the parameters of a discursive morality and its implications for feminism and moral theory.
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  4.  7
    Susan J. Hekman (2010). The Material of Knowledge: Feminist Disclosures. Indiana University Press.
    Introduction -- The first settlement : philosophy of science -- The second settlement : analytic philosophy -- The third settlement : Foucault : we have never been postmodern -- The fourth settlement : feminism : from epistemology to ontology -- From construction to disclosure : ontology and the social.
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  5. Susan J. Hekman (1986). Hermeneutics and the Sociology of Knowledge. University of Notre Dame Press.
  6. Susan Hekman (1995). Moral Voices, Moral Selves: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Moral Theory. Polity.
    This book is an original discussion of key problems in moral theory. The author argues that the work of recent feminist theorists in this area, particularly that of Carol Gilligan, marks a radically new departure in moral thinking. Gilligan claims that there is not only one true, moral voice, but two: one masculine, one feminine. Moral values and concerns associated with a feminine outlook are relational rather than autonomous; they depend upon interaction with others. In a far-reaching examination and critique (...)
     
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  7. Susan Hekman (2004). Private Selves, Public Identities: Reconsidering Identity Politics. Penn State University Press.
    In an age when "we are all multiculturalists now," as Nathan Glazer has said, the politics of identity has come to pose new challenges to our liberal polity and the presuppositions on which it is founded. Just what identity means, and what its role in the public sphere is, are questions that are being hotly debated. In this book Susan Hekman aims to bring greater theoretical clarity to the debate by exposing some basic misconceptions—about the constitution of the (...)
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  8. Susan Hekman (2010). The Material of Knowledge: Feminist Disclosures. Indiana University Press.
    Susan Hekman believes we are witnessing an intellectual sea change. The main features of this change are found in dichotomies between language and reality, discourse and materiality. Hekman proposes that it is possible to find a more intimate connection between these pairs, one that does not privilege one over the other. By grounding her work in feminist thought and employing analytic philosophy, scientific theory, and linguistic theory, Hekman shows how language and reality can be understood as (...)
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  9.  20
    Susan Hekman (1992). John Stuart Mill'sthe Subjection of Women: The Foundations of Liberal Feminism. History of European Ideas 15 (4-6):681-686.
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  10. Susan Hekman (1998). Material Bodies. In Donn Welton (ed.), Body and Flesh: A Philosophical Reader. Blackwell Publishers 61--70.
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  11. Susan Hekman (1995). Review of Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Culture and the Body and Bodies That Matter. [REVIEW] Hypatia 10 (4):151-57.
  12.  10
    Susan Hekman (2009). We Have Never Been Postmodern: Latour, Foucault and the Material of Knowledge. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (4):435.
    In We Have Never Been Modern Bruno Latour challenges the intellectual community to find an alternative to modernism that does not privilege either the discursive or the material in the construction of knowledge. A central aspect of his thesis is the rejection of postmodernism as a version of linguistic constructionism. I challenge his assessment of one postmodern, Michel Foucault, by arguing that Foucault's work successfully integrates the discursive and the material. Focusing on Foucault's theory of power, I argue that he (...)
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  13.  24
    Susan Hekman (1984). Action as a Text: Gadamer's Hermeneutics and the Social Scientific Analysis of Action. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 14 (3):333–354.
    This paper argues that Gadamer's hermeneutics offers a methodological perspective for social and political theory that overcomes the impasse created by the dichotomy between the positivist and humanist approaches to social action. Both the positivists’attempt to replace the actors’subjective concepts with the objective concepts of the social scientist and the humanists’attempt to describe meaningful action strictly in the social actors’terms have been called into question in contemporary discussions. Gadamer's approach, which is based on the hermeneutical method of textual interpretation, offers (...)
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  14. Susan Hekman (1991). Review of Self, Society, and Personal Choice by Diana T. Meyers. [REVIEW] Hypatia 6 (2):222-25.
     
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  15.  20
    Susan Hekman (1999). Identity Crises: Identity, Identity Politics, and Beyond. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (1):3-26.
  16.  26
    Susan Hekman (1983). From Epistemology to Ontology: Gadamer's Hermeneutics and Wittgensteinian Social Science. [REVIEW] Human Studies 6 (1):205 - 224.
  17.  25
    Susan Hekman (1993). Moral Voices, Moral Selves: About Getting It Right in Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Human Studies 16 (1-2):143 - 162.
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  18.  4
    Susan J. Hekman (2001). Perspectives on Equality: Constructing a Relational Theory (Review). Hypatia 16 (3):163-166.
  19.  14
    Susan Hekman (2008). Review of Peg O'Connor, Morality and Our Complicated Form of Life: Feminist Wittgensteinian Metaethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (10).
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  20.  14
    Susan Hekman (1987). Antifoundational Thought and the Sociology of Knowledge: The Case of Karl Mannheim. [REVIEW] Human Studies 10 (3-4):333 - 356.
  21.  12
    Susan Hekman (2006). Book Review: Nancy Hirschmann. The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom. And Seyla Benhabib. The Claims of Culture: Equality and Diversity in the Global Era. [REVIEW] Hypatia 21 (3):190-194.
  22. Susan Hekman (2005). Patchen Markell, Bound By Recognition Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (4):278-280.
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  23.  4
    Susan J. Hekman (2006). The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, And: The Claims of Culture: Equality and Diversity in the Global Era (Review). Hypatia 21 (3):190-194.
  24.  2
    Susan Hekman (2001). Book Review: Christine M. Koggel.Perspectives on Equality: Constructing a Relational Theory. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (3):163-166.
  25.  4
    Susan Hekman (1982). The Althusserian Critique of Weber: A Reassessment. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 12 (1):83–102.
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  26.  1
    Susan Hekman (1999). Introduction. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (1):1-2.
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  27. Stacy Alaimo & Susan Hekman (eds.) (2008). Material Feminisms. Indiana University Press.
    Harnessing the energy of provocative theories generated by recent understandings of the human body, the natural world, and the material world, Material Feminisms presents an entirely new way for feminists to conceive of the question of materiality. In lively and timely essays, an international group of feminist thinkers challenges the assumptions and norms that have previously defined studies about the body. These wide-ranging essays grapple with topics such as the material reality of race, the significance of sexual difference, the impact (...)
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  28. Susan Hekman (1999). Identity Crises: Identity, Identity Politics, and Beyond. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (1):3-26.
  29. Susan Hekman (1999). Backgrounds and Riverbeds: Feminist Reflections. Feminist Studies 25.
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  30. Susan Hekman (2001). Book Review: Christine M. Koggel.Perspectives on Equality: Constructing a Relational Theory. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 16 (3):163-166.
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  31. Susan Hekman (2006). Book Review: Nancy Hirschmann. The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom. And Seyla Benhabib. The Claims of Culture: Equality and Diversity in the Global Era. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 21 (3):190-194.
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  32. Susan Hekman (ed.) (1996). Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault. Penn State University Press.
    This volume presents an exploration of the intersection between the work of Michel Foucault and feminist theory, focusing on Foucault's theories of sex/body, identity/subject, and power/politics. Like the other books in this series, this volume seeks to bring a feminist perspective to bear on the interpretation of a major figure in the philosophical canon. In the case of Michel Foucault, however, this aim is somewhat ironic because Foucault sees his work as disrupting that very canon. Since feminists see their work (...)
     
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  33. Susan Hekman (ed.) (2007). Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault. Penn State University Press.
    This volume presents an exploration of the intersection between the work of Michel Foucault and feminist theory, focusing on Foucault's theories of sex/body, identity/subject, and power/politics. Like the other books in this series, this volume seeks to bring a feminist perspective to bear on the interpretation of a major figure in the philosophical canon. In the case of Michel Foucault, however, this aim is somewhat ironic because Foucault sees his work as disrupting that very canon. Since feminists see their work (...)
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  34. Susan Hekman (2013). Moral Voices, Moral Selves: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Moral Theory. Polity.
    This book is an original discussion of key problems in moral theory. The author argues that the work of recent feminist theorists in this area, particularly that of Carol Gilligan, marks a radically new departure in moral thinking. Gilligan claims that there is not only one true, moral voice, but two: one masculine, one feminine. Moral values and concerns associated with a feminine outlook are relational rather than autonomous; they depend upon interaction with others. In a far-reaching examination and critique (...)
     
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  35. Susan Hekman (2013). Moral Voices, Moral Selves: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Moral Theory. Polity.
    This book is an original discussion of key problems in moral theory. The author argues that the work of recent feminist theorists in this area, particularly that of Carol Gilligan, marks a radically new departure in moral thinking. Gilligan claims that there is not only one true, moral voice, but two: one masculine, one feminine. Moral values and concerns associated with a feminine outlook are relational rather than autonomous; they depend upon interaction with others. In a far-reaching examination and critique (...)
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  36. Susan Hekman (2013). Moral Voices, Moral Selves: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Moral Theory. Polity.
    This book is an original discussion of key problems in moral theory. The author argues that the work of recent feminist theorists in this area, particularly that of Carol Gilligan, marks a radically new departure in moral thinking. Gilligan claims that there is not only one true, moral voice, but two: one masculine, one feminine. Moral values and concerns associated with a feminine outlook are relational rather than autonomous; they depend upon interaction with others. In a far-reaching examination and critique (...)
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  37. Susan Hekman (1994). Max Weber and Post-Positivist Social Theory. In Asher Horowitz & Terry Maley (eds.), The Barbarism of Reason: Max Weber and the Twilight of Enlightenment. University of Toronto Press 267--286.
     
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  38. Susan Hekman (2005). Private Selves, Public Identities: Reconsidering Identity Politics. Penn State University Press.
    In an age when "we are all multiculturalists now," as Nathan Glazer has said, the politics of identity has come to pose new challenges to our liberal polity and the presuppositions on which it is founded. Just what identity means, and what its role in the public sphere is, are questions that are being hotly debated. In this book Susan Hekman aims to bring greater theoretical clarity to the debate by exposing some basic misconceptions—about the constitution of the (...)
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  39. Susan J. Hekman (2000). Reconsidering Ethics and Politics. Theory and Event 4 (4).
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  40. Susan Hekman (2014). The Feminine Subject. Polity.
    In 1949 Simone de Beauvoir asked, “What does it mean to be a woman?” Her answer to that question inaugurated a radical transformation of the meaning of “woman” that defined the direction of subsequent feminist theory. What Beauvoir discovered is that it is impossible to define “woman” as an equal human being in our philosophical and political tradition. Her effort to redefine “woman” outside these parameters set feminist theory on a path of radical transformation. The feminist theorists who wrote in (...)
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  41. Susan Hekman (2014). The Feminine Subject. Polity.
    In 1949 Simone de Beauvoir asked, “What does it mean to be a woman?” Her answer to that question inaugurated a radical transformation of the meaning of “woman” that defined the direction of subsequent feminist theory. What Beauvoir discovered is that it is impossible to define “woman” as an equal human being in our philosophical and political tradition. Her effort to redefine “woman” outside these parameters set feminist theory on a path of radical transformation. The feminist theorists who wrote in (...)
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  42. Susan Hekman (2014). The Feminine Subject. Polity.
    In 1949 Simone de Beauvoir asked, “What does it mean to be a woman?” Her answer to that question inaugurated a radical transformation of the meaning of “woman” that defined the direction of subsequent feminist theory. What Beauvoir discovered is that it is impossible to define “woman” as an equal human being in our philosophical and political tradition. Her effort to redefine “woman” outside these parameters set feminist theory on a path of radical transformation. The feminist theorists who wrote in (...)
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  43. Susan Hekman (2014). The Feminine Subject. Polity.
    In 1949 Simone de Beauvoir asked, “What does it mean to be a woman?” Her answer to that question inaugurated a radical transformation of the meaning of “woman” that defined the direction of subsequent feminist theory. What Beauvoir discovered is that it is impossible to define “woman” as an equal human being in our philosophical and political tradition. Her effort to redefine “woman” outside these parameters set feminist theory on a path of radical transformation. The feminist theorists who wrote in (...)
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  44. Susan Hekman (2014). The Feminine Subject. Polity.
    In 1949 Simone de Beauvoir asked, “What does it mean to be a woman?” Her answer to that question inaugurated a radical transformation of the meaning of “woman” that defined the direction of subsequent feminist theory. What Beauvoir discovered is that it is impossible to define “woman” as an equal human being in our philosophical and political tradition. Her effort to redefine “woman” outside these parameters set feminist theory on a path of radical transformation. The feminist theorists who wrote in (...)
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  45. Susan Hekman (2010). The Material of Knowledge: Feminist Disclosures. Indiana University Press.
    Susan Hekman believes we are witnessing an intellectual sea change. The main features of this change are found in dichotomies between language and reality, discourse and materiality. Hekman proposes that it is possible to find a more intimate connection between these pairs, one that does not privilege one over the other. By grounding her work in feminist thought and employing analytic philosophy, scientific theory, and linguistic theory, Hekman shows how language and reality can be understood as (...)
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  46.  16
    Susan Hekman (1991). Reconstituting the Subject: Feminism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Hypatia 6 (2):44 - 63.
    Political agency is vital to the formulation of a feminist politics so feminists have attempted to create a subject that eschews the sexism of the Cartesian subject while at the same time retaining agency. This paper examines some of the principal feminist attempts to reconstitute the subject along these lines. It assesses the success of these attempts in light of the question of whether the subject is a necessary component of feminist theory and practice.
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