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  1. Susan Keith (2013). A Viewing Dynamic That Endures. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 28 (4):302-304.
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  2. B. William Silcock, Carol B. Schwalbe & Susan Keith (2008). "Secret" Casualties: Images of Injury and Death in the Iraq War Across Media Platforms. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):36 – 50.
    This study examined more than 2,500 war images from U.S. television news, newspapers, news magazines, and online news sites during the first five weeks of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 and found that only 10% showed injury or death. The paper analyzes which media platforms were most willing to show casualties and offers insights on when journalists should use gruesome war images or keep them secret.
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  3. B. William Silcock, Carol B. Schwalbe & Susan Keith (2008). “Secret” Casualties: Images of Injury and Death in the Iraq War Across Media Platforms. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):36-50.
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  4. Susan Keith, Carol B. Schwalbe & B. William Silcock (2006). Images in Ethics Codes in an Era of Violence and Tragedy. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (4):245 – 264.
    In an analysis of 47 U.S. journalism ethics codes, we found that although most consider images, only 9 address a gripping issue: how to treat images of tragedy and violence, such as those produced on the battlefields of Iraq, during the 2005 London bombings, and after Hurricane Katrina. Among codes that consider violent and tragic images, there is agreement on what images are problematic and a move toward green-light considerations of ethical responsibilities. However, the special problems of violence and truth (...)
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  5. Lisa H. Newton, Louis Hodges & Susan Keith (2004). Accountability in the Professions: Accountability in Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):166 – 190.
    Accountability is viewed as a civilizing element in society, with professional accountability formalized in most cases as duties dating to the Greeks and Socrates; journalists must find their own way, without formal professional or government regulation or licensing. Three scholars look at the process in a line from the formal professional discipline to suggesting problems the journalism fraternity faces without regulation to suggesting serious internal ethics conferences as 1 solution to the problem.
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  6. Susan Keith (2000). The Existential Copy Editor. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 15 (1):43 – 57.
    Newspaper copy editors labor in anonymity and struggle for respect in their newsrooms. These conditions may make it difficult for them to realize their potential as the last line of defense against violations of ethical practice. By adopting existentialism as a guiding moral philosophy, however, copy editors can find the courage and confidence to act as final guardians of ethical journalism. This article examines how copy editors are often overlooked in the literature of journalism ethics and suggests ways in which (...)
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