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  1. Susan M. Wolf & Jeffrey P. Kahn (forthcoming). Bioethics Matures: The Field Faces the Future. Hastings Center Report.
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  2. Gail E. Henderson, Susan M. Wolf, Kristine J. Kuczynski, Steven Joffe, Richard R. Sharp, D. Williams Parsons, Bartha M. Knoppers, Joon‐Ho Yu & Paul S. Appelbaum (2014). The Challenge of Informed Consent and Return of Results in Translational Genomics: Empirical Analysis and Recommendations. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):344-355.
    As exome and genome sequencing move into clinical application, questions surround how to elicit consent and handle potential return of individual genomic results. This study analyzes nine consent forms used in NIH-funded sequencing studies. Content analysis reveals considerable heterogeneity, including in defining results that may be returned, identifying potential benefits and risks of return, protecting privacy, addressing placement of results in the medical record, and data-sharing. In response to lack of consensus, we offer recommendations.
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  3. Leili Fatehi, Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey McCullough, Ralph Hall, Frances Lawrenz, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Cortney Jones, Stephen A. Campbell, Rebecca S. Dresser, Arthur G. Erdman, Christy L. Haynes, Robert A. Hoerr, Linda F. Hogle, Moira A. Keane, George Khushf, Nancy M. P. King, Efrosini Kokkoli, Gary Marchant, Andrew D. Maynard, Martin Philbert, Gurumurthy Ramachandran, Ronald A. Siegel & Samuel Wickline (2012). Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):716-750.
    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an (...)
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  4. Susan M. Wolf (2012). INTRODUCTION: The Challenge of Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research: Protecting Participants, Workers, Bystanders, and the Environment. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):712-715.
  5. Jordan Paradise, Susan M. Wolf, Jennifer Kuzma, Aliya Kuzhabekova, Alison W. Tisdale, Efrosini Kokkoli & Gurumurthy Ramachandran (2009). Developing U.S. Oversight Strategies for Nanobiotechnology: Learning From Past Oversight Experiences. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):688-705.
    The emergence of nanotechnology, and specifically nanobiotechnology, raises major oversight challenges. In the United States, government, industry, and researchers are debating what oversight approaches are most appropriate. Among the federal agencies already embroiled in discussion of oversight approaches are the Food and Drug Administration , Environmental Protection Agency , Department of Agriculture , Occupational Safety and Health Administration , and National Institutes of Health . All can learn from assessment of the successes and failures of past oversight efforts aimed at (...)
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  6. Jordan Paradise, Susan M. Wolf, Jennifer Kuzma, Gurumurthy Ramachandran & Efrosini Kokkoli (2009). Introduction. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):543-545.
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  7. Susan M. Wolf, Rishi Gupta & Peter Kohlhepp (2009). Gene Therapy Oversight: Lessons for Nanobiotechnology. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):659-684.
    Oversight of human gene transfer research presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene (...)
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  8. Hassan Siddiki, J. G. Fletcher, Beth McFarland, Nora Dajani, Nicholas Orme, Barbara Koenig, Marguerite Strobel & Susan M. Wolf (2008). Incidental Findings in CT Colonography: Literature Review and Survey of Current Research Practice. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):320-331.
    Incidental fndings of potential medical signifcance are seen in approximately 5-8 percent of asymptomatic subjects and 16 percent of symptomatic subjects participating in large computed tomography colonography studies, with the incidence varying further by CT acquisition technique. While most CTC research programs have a well-defned plan to detect and disclose IFs, such plans are largely communicated only verbally. Written consent documents should also inform subjects of how IFs of potential medical signifcance will be detected and reported in CTC research studies.
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  9. Susan M. Wolf (2008). Confronting Physician Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: My Father's Death. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 23-26.
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  10. Susan M. Wolf (2008). Introduction: The Challenge of Incidental Findings. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):216-218.
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  11. Susan M. Wolf (2008). Neurolaw: The Big Question. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):21 – 22.
  12. Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond (2008). Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
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  13. Susan M. Wolf, Jordan Paradise & Charlisse Caga-Anan (2008). The Law of Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Establishing Researchers' Duties. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):361-383.
    Research technologies can now produce so much information that there is signifcant potential for incidental fndings . These are fndings generated in research that are beyond the aims of the study. Current law and federal regulations ofer no direct guidance on how to deal with IFs in research, nor is there adequate professional or institutional guidance. We advocate a defned set of researcher duties based on law and ethics and recommend a pathway to be followed in handling IFs in research. (...)
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  14. Jeffrey P. Kahn & Susan M. Wolf (2007). Understanding the Role of Genetics in Disability Insurance. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (s2):5-5.
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  15. Susan M. Wolf & Jeffrey P. Kahn (2007). Genetic Testing and the Future of Disability Insurance: Ethics, Law & Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (s2):6-32.
    Predictive genetic testing poses fundamental questions for disability insurance, a crucial resource funding basic needs when disability prevents income from work. This article, from an NIH-funded project, presents the first indepth analysis of the challenging issues: Should disability insurers be permitted to consider genetics and exclude predicted disability? May disabilities with a recognized genetic basis be excluded from coverage as pre-existing conditions? How can we assure that private insurers writing individual and group policies, employers, and public insurers deal competently and (...)
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  16. Susan M. Wolf (2006). Debating the Use of Racial and Ethnic Categories in Research. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (3):483-486.
  17. Susan M. Wolf & Jeffrey P. Kahn (2005). Bioethics Matures:. Hastings Center Report 35 (4):22-24.
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  18. Susan M. Wolf (2004). Law & Bioethics: From Values to Violence. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):293-306.
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  19. Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey P. Kahn & John E. Wagner (2003). Clinical, Ethical, and Legal Issues in Using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis to Create a Stem Cell Donor. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31:327-39.
     
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  20. Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey P. Kahn & John E. Wagner (2003). Using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis to Create a Stem Cell Donor: Issues, Guidelines & Limits. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):327-339.
  21. Susan M. Wolf (1997). Ban Cloning? Why NBAC Is Wrong. Hastings Center Report 27 (5):12-15.
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  22. Susan M. Wolf (ed.) (1996). Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction. Oxford University Press.
    Bioethics has paid surprisingly little attention to the special problems faced by women and to feminist analyses of current health care issues other than ...
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  23. Susan M. Wolf (1995). Beyond "Genetic Discrimination": Toward the Broader Harm of Geneticism. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (4):345-353.
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  24. Susan M. Wolf (1994). Health Care Reform and the Future of Physician Ethics. Hastings Center Report 24 (2):28-41.
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  25. Leon R. Kass, Derek Humphry & Susan M. Wolf (1992). Letters. Hastings Center Report 22 (6):44-45.
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  26. Susan M. Wolf (1992). Book Review:Surrogate Motherhood: Politics and Privacy. Larry Gostin. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (3):671-.
  27. Susan M. Wolf (1992). Due Process in Ethics Committee Case Review. HEC Forum 4 (2):83-96.
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  28. Susan M. Wolf (1992). Final Exit: The End of Argument. Hastings Center Report 22 (1):30-33.
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  29. Susan M. Wolf (1992). Toward a Theory of Process. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):278-290.
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  30. Mildred Z. Solomon, Bruce Jennings, Vivian Guilfoy, Rebecca Jackson, Lydia O'Donnell, Susan M. Wolf, Kathleen Nolan, Dieter Koch-Weser & Strachan Donnelley (1991). Toward An Expanded Vision of Clinical Ethics Education: From the Individual to the Institution. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (3):225-245.
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  31. Susan M. Wolf (1991). Honoring Broader Directives. Hastings Center Report 21 (5):8-16.
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  32. Susan M. Wolf (1990). Nancy Beth Cruzan: In No Voice At All. Hastings Center Report 20 (1):38-41.
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  33. Susan M. Wolf (1989). At the Center. Hastings Center Report 19 (2):1-1.
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  34. Susan M. Wolf (1989). Holding the Line on Euthanasia. Hastings Center Report 19 (1):13-15.
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  35. Susan M. Wolf (1988). Conflict Between Doctor and Patient. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (3-4):197-203.
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  36. Susan M. Wolf & Strachan Donnelley (1988). Doing Ethics in Italy. Hastings Center Report 18 (4):13-14.
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  37. Bruce Jennings, Daniel Callahan & Susan M. Wolf (1987). Introduction: The Public Duties of the Professions. Hastings Center Report 17 (1):1-2.
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  38. Bruce Jennings, Daniel Callahan & Susan M. Wolf (1987). The Professions: Public Interest and Common Good. Hastings Center Report 17 (1):3-10.
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  39. Susan M. Wolf (1987). Trying Not to Talk Forever: A Tool for Change. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 15 (4):248-253.
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  40. Susan M. Wolf (1986). Ethics Committees: In The Courts. Hastings Center Report 16 (3):12-15.
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