Search results for 'Susan Meininger Morris' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susan Meininger Morris (2003). Nietzsche, Aesthetics, and Modernity (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):106-108.score: 870.0
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  2. Susan E. Sanders & Heather Morris (2010). Exposing Student Teachers' Content Knowledge: Empowerment or Debilitation? Educational Studies 26 (4):397-408.score: 280.0
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  3. John Abromeit, Mark W. Cobb, Lilian Alweiss, Susan J. Armstrong, Richard G. Botzler, Ronald Aronson, Robin Attfield, Gordon Baker, Katherine Morris & Etienne Balibar (unknown). The Following Books Have Been Received and Are Available for Review. Please Contact the Reviews Editor: Jim. Oshea@ Ucd. Ie. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):517 - 523.score: 240.0
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  4. Suelyn Ching Tune, Julie Stewart Williams, Susan Nunes, Vivian L. Thompson, Aldyth Morris, Lu Xun, William A. Lyell, Gary Pak, Margaret K. Pai & Uno Chiyo (2013). Maui and the Secret of Fire. Philosophy East and West 63 (2).score: 240.0
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  5. William Morris (2001). The Earthly Paradise by William Morris. Routledge.score: 150.0
    This annotated critical edition is the first attempt to make Morris's 42,000-word verse sequence accessible to a modern audience.
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  6. Henry Morris (1984). The Henry Morris Collection. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    Henry Morris (1889-1961), the great educational philosopher, and initiator of the integrated community educational centre - embodied in the Cambridgeshire village college system - was county education officer and had his first 'memorandum' on the concept of community education printed by the Cambridge University Press. 1984 is both the 60th anniversary of his first memorandum and the 400th anniversary of the Press and this commemorative book will be published to coincide with a number of events to celebrate that. The (...)
     
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  7. Michael Morris (2007). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this textbook, Michael Morris offers a critical introduction to the central issues of the philosophy of language. Each chapter focusses on one or two texts which have had a seminal influence on work in the subject, and uses these as a way of approaching both the central topics and the various traditions of dealing with them. Texts include classic writings by Frege, Russell, Kripke, Quine, Davidson, Austin, Grice and Wittgenstein. Theoretical jargon is kept to a minimum and is (...)
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  8. Stephen G. Morris (2009). The Evolution of Cooperative Behavior and its Implications for Ethics. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):915-926.score: 60.0
    While many philosophers agree that evolutionary theory has important implications for the study of ethics, there has been no consensus on what these implications are. I argue that we can better understand these implications by examining two related yet distinct issues in evolutionary theory: the evolution of our moral beliefs and the evolution of cooperative behavior. While the prevailing evolutionary account of morality poses a threat to moral realism, a plausible model of how altruism evolved in human beings provides the (...)
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  9. Colin Morris (1972/1987). The Discovery of the Individual, 1050-1200. University of Toronto Press in Association with the Medieval Academy of America.score: 60.0
    Colin Morris traces the origin of the concept of the individual, not to the Renaissance where it is popularly assumed to have been invented, but farther back, ...
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  10. Norval Morris (1992). The Brothel Boy, and Other Parables of the Law. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The mystery does not always end when the crime has been solved. Indeed, the most insolvable problems of crime and punishment are not so much who committed the crime, but how to see that justice is done. Now, in this illuminating volume, one of America's great legal thinkers, Norval Morris, addresses some of the most perplexing and controversial questions of justice in a highly singular fashion--by examining them in fictional form, in what he calls "parables of the law." The (...)
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  11. Michael Morris (1992). The Good and the True. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book provides a radical alternative to naturalistic theories of content, and offers a new conception of the place of mind in the world. Confronting the scientific conception of the nature of reality that has dominated the Anglo-American philosophical tradition, Morris presents a detailed analysis of content and propositional attitudes based on the idea that truth is a value. He rejects the causal theory of the explanation of behavior and replaces it with an alternative that depends upon a rich (...)
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  12. Gordon Baker & Katherine Morris (1995). Descartes' Dualism. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Was Descartes a Cartesian Dualist? In this controversial study, Gordon Baker and Katherine J. Morris argue that, despite the general consensus within philosophy, Descartes was neither a proponent of dualism nor guilty of the many crimes of which he has been accused by twentieth century philosophers. In lively and engaging prose, Baker and Morris present a radical revision of the ways in which Descartes' work has been interpreted. Descartes emerges with both his historical importance assured and his philosophical (...)
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  13. Christopher W. Morris (2011). Questions of Life and Death: Readings in Practical Ethics. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Featuring sixty-seven classic and contemporary selections, Questions of Life and Death: Readings in Practical Ethics is ideal for courses in contemporary moral problems, applied ethics, and introduction to ethics. In contrast with other moral problems anthologies, it deals exclusively with current moral issues concerning life and death, the ethics of killing, and the ethics of saving lives. By focusing on these specific questions--rather than on an unrelated profusion of moral problems--this volume offers a theoretically unified presentation that enables students to (...)
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  14. Christopher Morris (2002). Reading Opera Between the Lines: Orchestral Interludes and Cultural Meaning From Wagner to Berg. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    A characteristic feature of Wagnerian and post-Wagnerian opera is the tendency to link scenes with numerous and often surprisingly lengthy orchestral interludes, frequently performed with the curtain closed. Often taken for granted or treated as a filler by audiences and critics, these interludes can take on very prominent roles, representing dream sequences, journeys and sexual encounters, and in some cases becoming a highlight of the opera. Christopher Morris investigates the implications of these important but strangely overlooked passages. Combining close (...)
     
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  15. Eddy Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2006). Is Incompatibilism Intuitive? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):28 - 53.score: 30.0
    Incompatibilists believe free will is impossible if determinism is true, and they often claim that this view is supported by ordinary intuitions. We challenge the claim that incompatibilism is intuitive to most laypersons and discuss the significance of this challenge to the free will debate. After explaining why incompatibilists should want their view to accord with pretheoretical intuitions, we suggest that determining whether incompatibilism is in fact intuitive calls for empirical testing. We then present the results of our studies, which (...)
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  16. J. S. Morris, A. Ohman & Raymond J. Dolan (1998). Conscious and Unconscious Emotional Learning in the Human Amygdala. Nature 393:467-470.score: 30.0
  17. Eddy A. Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2005). Surveying Freedom: Folk Intuitions About Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Psychology 18 (5):561-584.score: 30.0
    Philosophers working in the nascent field of ‘experimental philosophy’ have begun using methods borrowed from psychology to collect data about folk intuitions concerning debates ranging from action theory to ethics to epistemology. In this paper we present the results of our attempts to apply this approach to the free will debate, in which philosophers on opposing sides claim that their view best accounts for and accords with folk intuitions. After discussing the motivation for such research, we describe our methodology of (...)
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  18. Eddy Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2004). The Phenomenology of Free Will. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (7-8):162-179.score: 30.0
    Philosophers often suggest that their theories of free will are supported by our phenomenology. Just as their theories conflict, their descriptions of the phenomenology of free will often conflict as well. We suggest that this should motivate an effort to study the phenomenology of free will in a more systematic way that goes beyond merely the introspective reports of the philosophers themselves. After presenting three disputes about the phenomenology of free will, we survey the (limited) psychological research on the experiences (...)
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  19. David Morris (2005). Animals and Humans, Thinking and Nature. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):49-72.score: 30.0
    Studies that compare human and animal behaviour suspend prejudices about mind, body and their relation, by approaching thinking in terms of behaviour. Yet comparative approaches typically engage another prejudice, motivated by human social and bodily experience: taking the lone animal as the unit of comparison. This prejudice informs Heidegger’s and Merleau-Ponty’s comparative studies, and conceals something important: that animals moving as a group in an environment can develop new sorts of “sense.” The study of animal group-life suggests a new way (...)
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  20. Katherine J. Morris (1984). In Defense of Methodological Solipsism: A Reply to Noonan. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):399-412.score: 30.0
    Noonan's arguments against methodological solipsism ("methodological solipsism," "philosophical studies" 4, 1981) assumes that mental states are individuated by (russellian) content; this assumption entails that narrowness and wideness are intrinsic to mental states. I propose an alternative "extrinsic" reading of methodological solipsism, According to which narrowness and wideness are modes of attribution of mental states, And thus reject the doctrine of individuation by russellian content. Noonan's arguments fail against this version of methodological solipsism.
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  21. M. Morris (1991). Why There Are No Mental Representations. Minds and Machines 1 (1):1-30.score: 30.0
    I argue that there are no mental representations, in the sense of “representation” used in standard computational theories of the mind. I take Cummins' Meaning and Mental Representation as my stalking-horse, and argue that his view, once properly developed, is self-defeating. The argument implicitly undermines Fodor's view of the mind; I draw that conclusion out explicitly. The idea of mental representations can then only be saved by appeal to a Dennett-like instrumentalism; so I argue against that too. Finally, I argue (...)
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  22. Michael Morris (1992). Beyond Interpretation: Reply to Cummins' Response. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 2 (1):85-95.score: 30.0
    In his response to my Why There Are No Mental Representations, Robert Cummins accused me of having misinterpreted his views, and attempted to undermine a crucial premise of my argument, which claimed that one could only define a semantic type non-semantically by stipulating which tokens should receive a uniform interpretation. I respond to the charge and defend the premise.
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  23. Katherine J. Morris (1996). Pain, Injury, and First/Third-Person Asymmetry. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (1):125-56.score: 30.0
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  24. William E. Morris (1990). Knowledge and the Regularity Theory of Information. Synthese 82 (3):375-398.score: 30.0
    Fred Dretske's "Knowledge and the Flow of Information" is an extended attempt to develop a philosophically useful theory of information. Dretske adapts central ideas from Shannon and Weaver's mathematical theory of communication, and applies them to some traditional problems in epistemology. In doing so, he succeeds in building for philosophers a much-needed bridge to important work in cognitive science. The pay-off for epistemologists is that Dretske promises a way out of a long-standing impasse -- the Gettier problem. He offers an (...)
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  25. William E. Morris & Robert C. Richardson (1995). How Not to Demarcate Cognitive Science and Folk Psychology: A Response to Pickering and Chater. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 5 (3):339-355.score: 30.0
    Pickering and Chater (P&C) maintain that folk psychology and cognitive science should neither compete nor cooperate. Each is an independent enterprise, with a distinct subject matter and characteristic modes of explanation. P&C''s case depends upon their characterizations of cognitive science and folk psychology. We question the basis for their characterizations, challenge both the coherence and the individual adequacy of their contrasts between the two, and show that they waver in their views about the scope of each. We conclude that P&C (...)
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  26. A. C. Morris (1998). Commentary on ''Cortical Activity and the Explanatory Gap''. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (2):193-195.score: 30.0
  27. P. J. Watson, R. J. Morris & A. Hickman Ramsey (1996). Further Contrasts Between Self-Reflectiveness and Internal State Awareness Factors of Private Self-Consciousness. Journal of Psychology 130:183-92.score: 30.0
  28. M. Morris (1986). Causes of Behavior. Philosophical Quarterly 36 (April):123-44.score: 30.0
  29. P. J. Hampson & P. E. Morris (1978). Unfulfilled Expectations: A Criticism of Neisser's Theory of Imagery. Cognition 6 (March):79-85.score: 30.0
  30. P. J. Hampson & P. E. Morris (1990). Imagery, Consciousness, and Cognitive Control: The Boss Model Reviewed. In P. J. Hampson, D. F. Marks & Janet Richardson (eds.), Imagery: Current Developments. Routledge.score: 30.0
     
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  31. P. E. Morris & P. J. Hampson (1983). Imagery and Consciousness. Academic Press.score: 30.0
  32. John M. Morris & Ray Dolan (2001). The Amygdala and Unconscious Fear Processing. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. 185-204.score: 30.0
  33. C. R. Morris (1926). The Notion of Emergence. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 6:49-55.score: 30.0
     
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  34. William E. Morris (1990). The Regularity Theory of Information. Synthese 82:375-398.score: 30.0
     
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  35. L. Susan Stebbing (1934). Idealistic Logic: A Study of its Aim, Method, and Achievement. By C. R. Morris, M.A., (London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd. 1933. Pp. X + 338. Price 12s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 9 (35):368-.score: 24.0
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  36. Susan Petrilli (2008). The Relation with Morris in Rossi-Landi's and Sebeok's Approach to Signs. American Journal of Semiotics 24 (4):89-121.score: 24.0
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  37. Susan Petrilli (1999). Charles Morris's Biosemiotics. Semiotica 127 (1-4):67-102.score: 24.0
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  38. Susan Petrilli (1987). Da Peirce (via Morris e Jakobson) a Sebeok: I segni di un percorso. Idee 5:123-132.score: 24.0
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  39. Susan Petrilli (2004). From Pragmatic Philosophy to Behavioral Semiotics: Charles W. Morris After Charles S. Peirce. Semiotica 2004 (148).score: 24.0
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  40. Susan Petrilli (1990). Il Carteggio Rossi-Landi-Morris. Idee 13:155-170.score: 24.0
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  41. Susan Petrilli (1992). Social Practice, Semiotics and the Sciences of Man, the Correspondence Between Morris, Charles and Rossilandi, Ferruccio. Semiotica 88 (1-2):1.score: 24.0
     
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  42. Cornelis de Waal (2007). Susan Haack a Complete Bibliography. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.score: 21.0
    In this volume comprised of sixteen essays and rebuttals, author and professor of philosophy Susan Haack responds to her fellow philosophers and her critics on a wide range of topics that involve much more than the esoteric nature of contemporary philosophy. Instead, as is Haack's forte, she asserts her views on important current issues such as how scientists conduct their work, the ethics of affirmative action and the pitfalls of preferential hiring, and how the distorted reality the postmodern thinkers (...)
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  43. Christine E. Gudorf (2004). Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.score: 18.0
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief treatment (...)
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  44. Piers J. Hale (2010). Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):17 - 66.score: 18.0
    During the British socialist revival of the 1880s competing theories of evolution were central to disagreements about strategy for social change. In News from Nowhere (1891), William Morris had portrayed socialism as the result of Lamarckian processes, and imagined a non-Malthusian future. H.G. Wells, an enthusiastic admirer of Morris in the early days of the movement, became disillusioned as a result of the Malthusianism he learnt from Huxley and his subsequent rejection of Lamarckism in light of Weismann's experiments (...)
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  45. Piers J. Hale (2003). Labor and the Human Relationship with Nature: The Naturalization of Politics in the Work of Thomas Henry Huxley, Herbert George Wells, and William Morris. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):249 - 284.score: 18.0
    Historically labor has been central to human interactions with the environment, yet environmentalists pay it scant attention. Indeed, they have been critical of those who foreground labor in their politics, socialists in particular. However, environmentalists have found the nineteenth-century socialist William Morris appealing despite the fact that he wrote extensively on labor. This paper considers the place of labor in the relationship between humanity and the natural world in the work of Morris and two of his contemporaries, the (...)
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  46. Susan Hurley (2001). Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.score: 15.0
    [Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether it (...)
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  47. Harold W. Noonan (1984). Methodological Solipsism: A Reply to Morris. Philosophical Studies 48 (September):285-290.score: 15.0
  48. James Cargile (1996). Evidence and Inquiry by Susan Haack. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (3):621-625.score: 15.0
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  49. Max Black (1981). Philosophy of Logics By Susan Haack Cambridge University Press, 1978, Xvi + 276 Pp., £13.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 56 (217):435-.score: 15.0
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  50. Steve Edwards (2010). William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones: Interlacings; The Poetry of Chartism: Aesthetics, Politics, History. Historical Materialism 18 (2):165-176.score: 15.0
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