Search results for 'Susan Pearson' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Susan Mary Pearson (University of Warwick)
  1.  7
    Marc Hauser, Susan Perry, Joseph H. Manson, Helen Ball, Michael Williams, Erik Pearson & John Berard (1991). It's All in the Hands of the Beholder: New Data on Free-Ranging Rhesus Monkeys. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):342-344.
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  2.  51
    Susan Pearson (2012). Review of Roger Slee, The Irregular School: Exclusion, Schooling and Inclusive Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (2):199-206.
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  3.  4
    Susan Pearson (2013). Speaking Bodies, Speaking Minds: Animals, Language, History. History and Theory 52 (4):91-108.
    This essay explores a nineteenth-century debate over the linguistic capacity of animals in order to consider the links among language, reason, and history. Taking the American animal-protection movement as a point of departure, I show how protectionists, linguists, anthropologists, and advocates of deaf education were divided about the origins and nature of language. Was language a product of the soul and thus unique to humans, or was it a function of the body, a complex form of the corporeal expressions that (...)
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  4.  15
    Karl Pearson, The Grammar of Science, by Karl Pearson ..
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  5.  9
    Charls Pearson (2008). The Use of Synesthesia Experiments to Demonstrate a Double Application of Pearson's Principle of Paradigm Inversionwith a Balanced Set of Goals. Semiotics:452-462.
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  6. William Kingdon Clifford, Karl Pearson & James Roy Newman (1946). The Common Sense of the Exact Sciences. Edited, and with a Pref. By Karl Pearson; Newly Edited and with an Introd. By James R. Newman; Pref. By Bertrand Russell. [REVIEW] Knopf.
     
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  7.  20
    Roger Slee (2012). Response to Susan Pearson's Review of The Irregular School. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (2):207-209.
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  8. Keith Ansell-Pearson & Keith Ansell Pearson (2012). Germinal Life: The Difference and Repetition of Deleuze. Routledge.
    _Germinal Life_ is the sequel to the highly successful _Viroid Life_. Where _Viroid Life_ provided a compelling reading of Nietzsche's philosophy of the human, _Germinal Life_ is an original and groundbreaking analysis of little known and difficult theoretical aspects of the work of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. In particular, Keith Ansell Pearson provides fresh and insightful readings of Deleuze's work on Bergson and Deleuze's most famous texts _Difference and Repetition_ and _A Thousand Plateaus_. _Germinal Life _also provides new insights (...)
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  9.  17
    Gordon Pearson & Martin Parker (2001). The Relevance of Ancient Greeks to Modern Business? A Dialogue on Business and Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):341 - 353.
    What follows is a dialogue, in the Platonic sense, concerning the justifications for "business ethics" as a vehicle for asking questions about the values of modern business organisations. The protagonists are the authors, Gordon Pearson – a pragmatist and sceptic where business ethics is concerned – and Martin Parker – a sociologist and idealist who wishes to be able to ask ethical questions of business. By the end of the dialogue we come to no agreement on the necessity or (...)
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  10. Keith Ansell-Pearson & Keith Ansell Pearson (2001). Philosophy and the Adventure of the Virtual. Routledge.
    With the development of new technologies and the Internet, the notion of the virtual has grown increasingly important. In this lucid collection of essays, Pearson bridges the continental-analytic divide in philosophy, bringing the virtual to centre stage and arguing its importance for re-thinking such central philosophical questions as time and life. Drawing on philosophers from Bergson, Kant and Nietzsche to Proust, Russell, Dennett and Badiou, Pearson examines the limits of continuity, explores relativity, and offers a concept of creative (...)
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  11.  38
    Keith Ansell-Pearson & Keith Ansell Pearson (1999). Germinal Life: The Difference and Repetition of Deleuze. Routledge.
    _Germinal Life_ is the sequel to the highly successful _Viroid Life_. Where _Viroid Life_ provided a compelling reading of Nietzsche's philosophy of the human, _Germinal Life_ is an original and groundbreaking analysis of little known and difficult theoretical aspects of the work of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. In particular, Keith Ansell Pearson provides fresh and insightful readings of Deleuze's work on Bergson and Deleuze's most famous texts _Difference and Repetition_ and _A Thousand Plateaus_. _Germinal Life _also provides new insights (...)
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  12.  26
    Michael Pearson (1990). Millennial Dreams and Moral Dilemmas: Seventh-Day Adventism and Contemporary Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Recent and rapid technological developments on many fronts have created in our society some extremely difficult moral predicaments. Previous generations have not had to face the dilemmas posed by, for example, the availability of safe abortions, sperm banks and prostoglandins. They have not had to come to terms with an unchecked exploitation of natural resources heralding imminent ecological crisis, or, worst of all, with the recognition that only in this current generation have people the capacity to destroy themselves and their (...)
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  13. Heath Pearson (1997). Origins of Law and Economics: The Economists' New Science of Law, 1830–1930. Cambridge University Press.
    This work analyzes the centrality of law in nineteenth-century historical and institutional economics and is a prehistory to the new institutional economics of the late twentieth century. In the 1830s the 'new science of law' aimed to explain the working rules of human society by using the methodologically individualist terms of economic discourse, stressing determinism and evolutionism. Practitioners stood readier than contemporary institutionalists to admit the possibilities of altruistic values, bounded rationality, and institutional inertia into their research program. Professor (...) shows that the positive analysis of law tended to push normative discussions up from the level of specific laws to that of society's political organization. The analysis suggests that the professionalization of the social sciences - and the new science's own imprecision - condemned the program to oblivion around 1930. Nonetheless, institutional economics is currently developing greater resemblances to the now-forgotten new science. (shrink)
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  14. Heath Pearson (1997). Origins of Law and Economics: The Economists' New Science of Law, 1830–1930. Cambridge University Press.
    This work analyzes the centrality of law in nineteenth-century historical and institutional economics and is a prehistory to the new institutional economics of the late twentieth century. In the 1830s the 'new science of law' aimed to explain the working rules of human society by using the methodologically individualist terms of economic discourse, stressing determinism and evolutionism. Practitioners stood readier than contemporary institutionalists to admit the possibilities of altruistic values, bounded rationality, and institutional inertia into their research program. Professor (...) shows that the positive analysis of law tended to push normative discussions up from the level of specific laws to that of society's political organization. The analysis suggests that the professionalization of the social sciences - and the new science's own imprecision - condemned the program to oblivion around 1930. Nonetheless, institutional economics is currently developing greater resemblances to the now-forgotten new science. (shrink)
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  15.  21
    Lionel Ignacius Cusack Pearson (1962). Popular Ethics in Ancient Greece. Stanford, Calif.,Stanford University Press.
    Library POPULAR ETHICS IN ANCIENT GREECE Lionel Pearson STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS STANFORD. ...
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  16.  52
    Roger Pearson (1993). The Fables of Reason: A Study of Voltaire's "Contes Philosophiques". Oxford University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive study in English of Voltaire's contes philosophiques--the philosophical tales for which he is best remembered and which include his masterpiece Candide. Pearson situates each story in its historical and intellectual context and offers new readings in light of modern critical thinking. He rejects the traditional view that Voltaire's contes were the private expression of his philosophical perplexity, and argues that it is narrative that is Voltaire's essential mode of thought. His book is a witty, (...)
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  17. G. Pearson (2009). Towards One World. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introduction to world affairs in 1961 and after. It shows in bold outline how our rather small, increasingly overpopulated world has come to be dominated by the two giants powers, the USA and the USSR, with a new class of neutralist ex-colonial countries holding an increasingly important position. While Mr Pearson shows the part played by European or Western influence in creating one world, he also stresses that the outlying parts of the world are now independent (...)
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  18. Cornelis de Waal (2007). Susan Haack a Complete Bibliography. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books
    In this volume comprised of sixteen essays and rebuttals, author and professor of philosophy Susan Haack responds to her fellow philosophers and her critics on a wide range of topics that involve much more than the esoteric nature of contemporary philosophy. Instead, as is Haack's forte, she asserts her views on important current issues such as how scientists conduct their work, the ethics of affirmative action and the pitfalls of preferential hiring, and how the distorted reality the postmodern thinkers (...)
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  19. Charles H. Pence (2011). “Describing Our Whole Experience”: The Statistical Philosophies of W. F. R. Weldon and Karl Pearson. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (4):475-485.
    There are two motivations commonly ascribed to historical actors for taking up statistics: to reduce complicated data to a mean value (e.g., Quetelet), and to take account of diversity (e.g., Galton). Different motivations will, it is assumed, lead to different methodological decisions in the practice of the statistical sciences. Karl Pearson and W. F. R. Weldon are generally seen as following directly in Galton’s footsteps. I argue for two related theses in light of this standard interpretation, based on a (...)
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  20.  80
    Ben Bramble (2015). On Susan Wolf’s “Good-for-Nothings". Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1071-1081.
    According to welfarism about value, something is good simpliciter just in case it is good for some being or beings. In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf argues against welfarism by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf provides three main arguments against this view, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, (...)
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  21.  15
    Christine E. Gudorf (2004). Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief treatment (...)
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  22. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2000). Hannah Arendt and Susan Griffin: Toward a Feminist Metahistory. In Cecile Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press
    Efforts to introduce particular-focused and emotionally engaged storytelling into historiography have sparked intense debate. Stone-Mediatore argues that women and other under-represented groups have a particular interest in defending the epistemic value of storytelling, but that we can do so meaningfully -- not by endorsing all storytelling -- but only by articulating a metahistory that challenges the division between history and story as well as makes explicit the interrelated epistemic and ethical goals of historical inquiry. The author draws on Hannah Arendt (...)
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  23.  76
    Susan Hurley (2001). Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.
    [ Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether (...)
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  24.  16
    Sara Protasi (2015). Susan Wolf, The Variety of Values: Essays on Morality, Meaning, and Love. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015.
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  25.  21
    Susan E. Bernick (1992). Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo. Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  26.  45
    James Cargile (1996). Evidence and Inquiry by Susan Haack. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (3):621-625.
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  27.  15
    Max Black (1981). Philosophy of Logics By Susan Haack Cambridge University Press, 1978, Xvi + 276 Pp., £13.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 56 (217):435-.
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  28.  71
    Deborah G. Mayo & Aris Spanos (2006). Severe Testing as a Basic Concept in a Neyman–Pearson Philosophy of Induction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):323-357.
    Despite the widespread use of key concepts of the Neyman–Pearson (N–P) statistical paradigm—type I and II errors, significance levels, power, confidence levels—they have been the subject of philosophical controversy and debate for over 60 years. Both current and long-standing problems of N–P tests stem from unclarity and confusion, even among N–P adherents, as to how a test's (pre-data) error probabilities are to be used for (post-data) inductive inference as opposed to inductive behavior. We argue that the relevance of error (...)
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  29.  34
    Frederique Janssen-Lauret (forthcoming). Susan Stebbing, Incomplete Symbols, and Foundherentist Meta-Ontology. Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy.
    Susan Stebbing's work on incomplete symbols and analysis was instrumental in clarifying, sharpening, and improving the project of logical constructions which was pivotal to early analytic philosophy. She dispelled use-mention confusions by restricting the term `incomplete symbol' to expressions eliminable through analysis, rather than those expressions' purported referents, and distinguished linguistic analysis from directional analysis of facts. In this paper I explore Stebbing's role in analytic philosophy's development from anti-holism, presupposing that analysis terminates in simples, to the more holist (...)
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  30.  36
    Margaret Morrison (2002). Modelling Populations: Pearson and Fisher on Mendelism and Biometry. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (1):39-68.
    The debate between the Mendelians and the (largely Darwinian) biometricians has been referred to by R. A. Fisher as ‘one of the most needless controversies in the history of science’ and by David Hull as ‘an explicable embarrassment’. The literature on this topic consists mainly of explaining why the controversy occurred and what factors prevented it from being resolved. Regrettably, little or no mention is made of the issues that figured in its resolution. This paper deals with the latter topic (...)
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  31. Vincent C. Müller (2009). Susan Stuart & Gordana Dodig Crnkovic : 'Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal'. [REVIEW] Cybernetics and Human Knowing 16 (3-4):201-203.
    Review of: "Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal", Ed. Susan Stuart & Gordana Dodig Crnkovic, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, September 2007, xxiv+340pp, ISBN: 9781847180902, Hardback: £39.99, $79.99 ---- Are you a computer? Is your cat a computer? A single biological cell in your stomach, perhaps? And your desk? You do not think so? Well, the authors of this book suggest that you think again. They propose a computational turn, a turn towards computational explanation and towards the explanation (...)
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  32.  80
    Eugene Marshall (2013). Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics, by Susan James (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):318-319.
    Event synopsis: Professor Susan James inverses Leo Strauss’ reading of Spinoza. Whereas Strauss emphasized the hidden subtext of Spinoza’s arguments, James revives the explicit debates of his time within which Spinoza's Theologico-Political Treatise was situated. But this is not a simple historical reconstruction. James’ close reading of the Treatise offers a radically new perspective on Spinoza’s revolutionary book – a reading that presents startling new perspective on the political, metaphysical and theological implications of the book. Given the importance of (...)
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  33.  7
    M. Eileen Magnello (1998). Karl Pearson's Mathematization of Inheritance: From Ancestral Heredity to Mendelian Genetics (1895–1909). Annals of Science 55 (1):35-94.
    Summary Long-standing claims have been made for nearly the entire twentieth century that the biometrician, Karl Pearson, and his colleague, W. F. R. Weldon, rejected Mendelism as a theory of inheritance. It is shown that at the end of the nineteenth century Pearson considered various theories of inheritance (including Francis Galton's law of ancestral heredity for characters underpinned by continuous variation), and by 1904 he ?accepted the fundamental idea of Mendel? as a theory of inheritance for discontinuous variation. (...)
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  34.  98
    Deborah G. Mayo (1992). Did Pearson Reject the Neyman-Pearson Philosophy of Statistics? Synthese 90 (2):233 - 262.
    I document some of the main evidence showing that E. S. Pearson rejected the key features of the behavioral-decision philosophy that became associated with the Neyman-Pearson Theory of statistics (NPT). I argue that NPT principles arose not out of behavioral aims, where the concern is solely with behaving correctly sufficiently often in some long run, but out of the epistemological aim of learning about causes of experimental results (e.g., distinguishing genuine from spurious effects). The view Pearson did (...)
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  35. Nikolay Milkov (2003). Susan Stebbing's Criticism of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 10:351-63.
    Susan Stebbing’s paper “Logical Positivism and Analysis” (March 1933) was unusually critical of Wittgenstein. It put up a sharp opposition between Cambridge analytic philosophy of Moore and Russell and the positivist philosophy of the Vienna Circle to which she included Wittgenstein from 1929–32. Above all, positivists were interested in analyzing language, analytic philosophers in analyzing facts. Moreover, whereas analytic philosophers were engaged in directional analysis which seeks to illuminate the multiplicity of the analyzed facts, positivists aimed at final analysis (...)
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  36.  6
    B. Norton (1975). Metaphysics and Population Genetics: Karl Pearson and the Background to Fisher's Multi-Factorial Theory of Inheritance. Annals of Science 32 (6):537-553.
    This paper traces the background to R. A. Fisher's multi-factorial theory of inheritance. It is argued that the traditional account is incomplete, and that Karl Pearson's well-known pre-Fisherian objections to the theory were in fact overcome by Pearson himself. It is further argued that Pearson's stated reasons for not accepting his own achievement has to be seen as a rationalization, standing in for deeper-seated metaphysical objections to the Mendelian paradigm of a type not readily discussed in a (...)
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  37. Axel Cleeremans & Erik Myin (1999). A Short Review of Consciousness in Action by Susan Hurley. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:455-458.
    Consider Susan Hurley's depiction of mainstream views of the mind: "The mind is a kind of sandwich, and cognition is the filling" (p. 401). This particular sandwich (with perception as the bottom loaf and action as the top loaf) tastes foul to Hurley, who devotes most of "Consciousness in Action" to a systematic and sometimes extraordinarily detailed critique of what has otherwise been dubbed "classical" models of the mind. This critique then provides the basis for her alternative proposal, in (...)
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  38.  14
    Anthony Chemero & William Cordeiro, "Dynamical, Ecological Sub-Persons" Commentary on Susan HurleyÂ's Consciousness in Action.
    In a way that is rarely even attempted, and even more rarely actually pulled off, Susan Hurley, in her book Consciousness in Action, brings scientific ideas into contact with mainstream philosophy. It is not at all unusual for empirical results from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience to be raised in discussion of issues in philosophy of science and philosophy of mind--Dennett and the Churchlands, for example, have been doing so for years. But Hurley attempts to draw empirical results even (...)
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  39.  59
    Johannes Lenhard (2006). Models and Statistical Inference: The Controversy Between Fisher and Neyman–Pearson. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (1):69-91.
    The main thesis of the paper is that in the case of modern statistics, the differences between the various concepts of models were the key to its formative controversies. The mathematical theory of statistical inference was mainly developed by Ronald A. Fisher, Jerzy Neyman, and Egon S. Pearson. Fisher on the one side and Neyman–Pearson on the other were involved often in a polemic controversy. The common view is that Neyman and Pearson made Fisher's account more stringent (...)
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  40.  78
    Simon Derpmann (2012). Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why It Matters. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):421-422.
    Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why it Matters Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10677-011-9321-8 Authors Simon Derpmann, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Philosophisches Seminar, Domplatz 23, 48143 Münster, Germany Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  41.  24
    Robert Northcott (2005). Pearson's Wrong Turning: Against Statistical Measures of Causal Efficacy. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):900-912.
    Standard statistical measures of strength of association, although pioneered by Pearson deliberately to be acausal, nowadays are routinely used to measure causal efficacy. But their acausal origins have left them ill suited to this latter purpose. I distinguish between two different conceptions of causal efficacy, and argue that: 1) Both conceptions can be useful 2) The statistical measures only attempt to capture the first of them 3) They are not fully successful even at this 4) An alternative definition more (...)
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  42.  20
    Deborah G. Mayo (1981). In Defense of the Neyman-Pearson Theory of Confidence Intervals. Philosophy of Science 48 (2):269-280.
    In Philosophical Problems of Statistical Inference, Seidenfeld argues that the Neyman-Pearson (NP) theory of confidence intervals is inadequate for a theory of inductive inference because, for a given situation, the 'best' NP confidence interval, [CIλ], sometimes yields intervals which are trivial (i.e., tautologous). I argue that (1) Seidenfeld's criticism of trivial intervals is based upon illegitimately interpreting confidence levels as measures of final precision; (2) for the situation which Seidenfeld considers, the 'best' NP confidence interval is not [CIλ] as (...)
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  43.  19
    Sigrid Weigel (2010). Between the Philosophy of Religion and Cultural History: Susan Taubes on the Birth of Tragedy and the Negative Theology of Modernity. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (150):115-135.
    The caesura of tragedy, more precisely tragedy as the scene of a caesura upon which an interruption occurs in the relation between divine grounds and human will, stands at the center of Susan Taubes's confrontation with tragedy. Moving beyond an explication of generic history, she analyzed the “Nature of Tragedy” (1953) as a phenomenon emerging from a cultural-historical threshold situation, illuminating tragedy's origins in the framework of her approach to ritual, religion, and philosophy. In respect to the history of (...)
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  44.  24
    Susuan Blackmore (2003). The ‘New Science of Memetics’: The Case for Susan Blackmore. Think 2 (5):21.
    In this article and the following one, Susan Blackmore and Michael Bradie take contrary positions on the ‘science of memetics’, an approach to explaining human behaviour and culture based on the idea that our minds and cultures are in large part determined by self-replicating gene-like entities called ‘memes’. Memes would seem to allow the application of evolutionary ideas to both biology and culture. Many find that thought exciting and appealing. Others consider it arrogant and scientistic. Who is right?
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  45.  45
    Achille C. Varzi (1998). Review of Susan Haack, Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond the Formalism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 107 (3):468-471.
    Book information: Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond The Formalism. By SUSAN HAACK. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1996. Pp. xxvi, 291.
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  46.  74
    Gilberto Gomes (2005). Is Consciousness Epiphenomenal? Comment on Susan Pockett. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (12):77-79.
    In a provocative article published in the Journal of Consciousness Studies, Susan Pockett argues for the plausibility of considering consciousness as an epiphenomenon of neural activity. This means that consciousness, though caused by the brain, would not in its turn have any role in the causation of neural activity and, consequently, of behaviour. Critical for her argument is the distinction she makes between 'consciousness per se' and 'the neural processing that accompanies it' . In her discussion, though, the author (...)
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  47.  4
    Deborah G. Mayo (1982). On After-Trial Criticisms of Neyman-Pearson Theory of Statistics. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:145 - 158.
    Despite its widespread use in science, the Neyman-Pearson Theory of Statistics (NPT) has been rejected as inadequate by most philosophers of induction and statistics. They base their rejection largely upon what the author refers to as after-trial criticisms of NPT. Such criticisms attempt to show that NPT fails to provide an adequate analysis of specific inferences after the trial is made, and the data is known. In this paper, the key types of after-trial criticisms are considered and it is (...)
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  48.  54
    H. G. Callaway (2000). Review: Susan Haack, Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate, Unfashionable Essays. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 53 (3):407-414.
    Susan Haack presents a striking and appealing figure in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. In spite of British birth and education, she appears to bridge the gap between analytic philosophy and American pragmatism, with its more diverse influences and sources. Well known for her writings in the philosophy of logic and epistemology, she fuses something of the hard-headed debunking style of a Bertrand Russell with a lively interest in Peirce, James and Dewey.
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  49.  17
    Mas'ud Zavarzadeh (1985). A Stragegy of Containment: Center and Margin in Desperately Seeking Susan. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (65):136-143.
    In her film, Desperately Seeking Susan, Susan Seidelman continues her inquiry into the relations between the “center” and the “margin” in contemporary culture. The ideology of the film represents the center — the status quo — as the site for mature negotiations of communal values, whereas it constructs the margin — the locus of opposition — as an instance of self-indulgence, transgression, and extremity. This is the same theme in her first film, Smithereens. This fascination with the tension (...)
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    Christina Pareigis (2010). Letter From Susan Taubes to Jacob Taubes April 4, 1952. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (150):111-114.
    Foreword This letter is part of a correspondence belonging to the estate of Susan Taubes. It documents the private and intellectual relations between her and Jacob Taubes, whom she married in 1949. The two spent most of the period until 1952 geographically separated from each other, a situation due to their changing work and study circumstances. Susan spent the first half of 1952 in Paris, preparing her dissertation at the Sorbonne; Jacob took up Gershom Scholem's invitation to teach (...)
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