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  1. Susan Power Bratton, P. Clayton & Z. Simpson (2006). Ecology and Religion. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. 207-225.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712129; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 207-225.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 222-225.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  2. Susan Power Bratton (1993). Loving Nature: Ecological Integrity and Christian Responsibility. Environmental Ethics 15 (1):93-96.
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  3. Susan Power Bratton (1993). Loving Nature. Environmental Ethics 15 (1):3-25.
    Christian ethics are usually based on a theology of love. In the case of Christian relationships to nature, Christian environmental writers have either suggested eros as a primary source for Christian love, without dealing with traditional Christian arguments against eros, or have assumed agape (spiritual love or sacrificial love) is the appropriate mode, without defining how agape should function in human relationships with the nonhuman portion of the universe. I demonstrate that God’s love for nature has the same form and (...)
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  4. Susan Power Bratton (1990). Thomas Berry: The Dream of the Earth. Environmental Ethics 12 (1):87-89.
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  5. Susan Power Bratton (1989). Richard Cartwright Austin: Beauty of the Lord. Environmental Ethics 11 (3):277-280.
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  6. Susan Power Bratton (1988). The Original Desert Solitaire: Early Christian Monasticism and Wilderness. Environmental Ethics 10 (1):31-53.
    Roderick Nash’s conc1usion in Wilderness and the American Mind that St. Francis “stood alone in a posture of humility and respect before the natural world” is not supported by thorough analysis of monastic literature. Rather St. Francis stands at the end of a thousand-year monastic tradition. Investigation of the “histories” and sayings of the desert fathers produces frequent references to the environment, particularly to wildlife. In stories about lions, wolves, antelopes, and other animals, the monks sometimes exercise spiritual powers over (...)
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  7. Susan Power Bratton (1985). National Park Management and Values. Environmental Ethics 7 (2):117-133.
    Throughout the history ofthe U.S. national park system, park advocates and managers have changed both acquisition priorities and internal management policies. The park movement began with the establishment of large, spectacular natural areas, primarily in the West. As the movement developed there was more emphasis on the biological, on recreation, and on parks near population centers. GraduaIly, scenic wonders and uniqueness have become less necessary to designation and the types of sites eligible have diversified. Early managers treated the parks as (...)
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  8. Susan Power Bratton (1985). The Spirit of the Earth. Environmental Ethics 7 (3):283-285.
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  9. Susan Power Bratton (1984). Christian Ecotheology and the Old Testament. Environmental Ethics 6 (3):195-209.
    Because of its theocentric nature and the dispersion of relevant passages, the Old Testament presentation of creation theology is frequently misunderstood. I investigate the works of modem Old Testament scholars, particularly Walther Eichrodt, Gerhard von Rad, and Claus Westermann, in regard to the theology of creation. Using principles of analysis suggested by Gerhard Hasel, I discuss how the Old Testament portrays God as acting in both the original creation and post-Genesis events. The role of God as creator is not independent (...)
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  10. Susan Power Bratton (1983). The Ecotheology of James Watt. Environmental Ethics 5 (3):225-236.
    The popular press has claimed that Secretary of the Interior James Watt bases his philosophy of environmental management on his religious views as a charismatic Christian. An examination of Watt’s published statements indicates: (1) his philosophy of environmental management sterns largely from economic and political considerations; (2) he has a relatively simple ecotheology based on concepts such as God providing creation as a blessing for mankind, and mankind having a stewardship responsibility to use resources to provide for people; (3) his (...)
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