Search results for 'Susan T. Brison' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  78
    Susan T. Brison (1993). Surviving Sexual Violence: A Philosophical Perspective. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):5-22.
  2.  35
    Susan Brison (2002). Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of a Self. Princeton University Press.
    Violence and the Remaking of a Self Susan J. Brison. Political activism (including lobbying for new legislation, speaking out, educating others, helping survivors) can also help to undo the double bind of self-blame versus helplessness.
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  3. Susan J. Brison (2003). Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of a Self. Princeton University Press.
    On July 4, 1990, while on a morning walk in southern France, Susan Brison was attacked from behind, severely beaten, sexually assaulted, strangled to unconsciousness, and left for dead. She survived, but her world was destroyed. Her training as a philosopher could not help her make sense of things, and many of her fundamental assumptions about the nature of the self and the world it inhabits were shattered.At once a personal narrative of recovery and a philosophical exploration of (...)
     
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  4.  78
    Susan J. Brison (2006). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    : In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book—domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling—but (...)
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  5.  2
    J. Brison Susan (2003). Beauvoir and Feminism: Interview and Reflections. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press 189.
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  6. Susan J. Brison (1998). The Autonomy Defense of Free Speech. Ethics 108 (2):312-339.
  7. Susan J. Brison (1996). Outliving Oneself: Trauma, Memory and Personal Identity. In Diana T. Meyers (ed.), Feminists Rethink the Self (Feminist Theory and Politics Series). Westview Press
     
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  8. David Estlund, Kok‐Chor Tan, Sophia Reibetanz, Susan J. Brison, Arthur Isak Applbaum, Tamara Horowitz, Elinor Mason & Jeff McMahan (1998). 10. Notes on Contributors Notes on Contributors (P. 460). In Stephen Everson (ed.), Ethics. Cambridge University Press
     
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  9. Susan J. Brison (2004). Review: Free Speech. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):351-357.
  10. Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Sandra Lee Bartky, Susan Bordo, Rosi Braidotti, Susan J. Brison, Judith Butler, Drucilla L. Cornell, Deirdre E. Davis, Nancy Fraser, Evelynn M. Hammonds, Nancy J. Hirschmann, Eva Feder Kittay, Sharon Marcus, Marsha Marotta, Julien S. Murphy, Iris MarionYoung & Linda M. G. Zerilli (2002). Gender Struggles: Practical Approaches to Contemporary Feminism. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The sixteen essays in Gender Struggles address a wide range of issues in gender struggles, from the more familiar ones that, for the last thirty years, have been the mainstay of feminist scholarship, such as motherhood, beauty, and sexual violence, to new topics inspired by post-industrialization and multiculturalism, such as the welfare state, cyberspace, hate speech, and queer politics, and finally to topics that traditionally have not been seen as appropriate subjects for philosophizing, such as adoption, care work, and the (...)
     
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  11. Susan J. Brison (2000). Relational Autonomy and Freedom of Expression. In Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.), Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency, and the Social Self. OUP Usa
     
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  12.  12
    Susan J. Brison (2006). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  13.  19
    Susan J. Brison (1998). Speech, Harm, and the Mind-Body Problem in First Amendment Jurisprudence. Legal Theory 4 (1):39-61.
    “Sucks and stones will break my bones,” Justice Scalia pronounced from the bench in oral arguments in Schenck v. Pro-Choice Network , “but words can never hurt me. That's the First Amendment,” he added. Jay Alan Sekulow, the lawyer for the petitioners, anti-abortion protesters who had been enjoined from moving closer than fifteen feet away from those entering an abortion facility, was obviously pleased by this characterization of the right to free speech, replying, “That's certainly our position on it, and (...)
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  14.  10
    Susan J. Brison (2001). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  15. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Susan J. Brison (eds.) (1993). Contemporary Perspectives on Constitutional Interpretation. Westview Press.
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  16.  10
    Susan J. Brison (2004). Speech and Other Acts. Legal Theory 10 (4):261-272.
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  17.  9
    Susan J. Brison (1989). The Intentional Stance. Philosophical Books 30 (3):169-172.
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  18.  17
    Susan J. Brison (2008). Book Review. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 27 (1):97-104.
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  19.  10
    M. Houghton Susan, T. A. Gabel Joan & W. Williams David (2009). Connecting the Two Faces of Csr: Does Employee Volunteerism Improve Compliance? Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4).
    In 2004, the United States Sentencing Commission amended the Federal Sentencing Guidelines to allow firms that create “effective compliance and ethics programs” to receive better treatment if prosecuted for fraud. Effective compliance and ethics, however, appear to be limited to activities focused on complying with the firms’ internal legal and ethical standards. We explored a potential connection between the firms’ external corporate social responsibility (CSR) behaviors and internal compliance: Is there an organizationally valid relationship between these two firm activities? That (...)
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  20.  3
    Susan J. Brison (1996). Taking Liberalism (and its Critics) Seriously. Philosophical Books 37 (4):241-251.
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  21. Susan J. Brison (2003). Beauvoir and Feminism: Interview and Reflections. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press 189--207.
     
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  22. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Susan J. Brison (1993). A Philosophical Indrocuction to Constitutional Interpretation. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Susan J. Brison (eds.), Contemporary Perspectives on Constitutional Interpretation. Westview Press 1-25.
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  23. Jacques Abbadie & W. T. (1695). The Art of Knowing One-Self: Or, an Enquiry Into the Sources of Morality [Tr. By T.W.].
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  24. Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. (1713). An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr. John Locke [by J. Le Clerc, Tr. By T.F.P.].
     
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  25. Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. (1714). An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr. John Locke [by J. Le Clerc, Tr. By T.F.P.]. [Followed by] the Last Will and Testament of John Locke. [REVIEW]
     
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  26. Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. (1706). The Life and Character of Mr. John Locke. Done Into Engl. By T.F.P.
     
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  27. W. T. (1698). A Dialogue Between Mr. Merriman, and Dr. Chymist: Concerning John Sergents Paradoxes, in His New Method to Science, and His Solid Philosophy. By T.W. [REVIEW] [S.N.].
     
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  28. L. T. L. T. (1908). NUNN, T. P. -The Aim and Achievements of Scientific Method. [REVIEW] Mind 17:274.
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  29.  1
    Love Thy Neighbour & Maybe Not (2009). Susan T. Gardner (Canada) Love Thy Neighbour? Maybe Not. In Eva Marsal, Takara Dobashi & Barbara Weber (eds.), Children Philosophize Worldwide: Theoretical and Practical Concepts. Peter Lang 421.
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  30. Charlotte Delbo (1997). Susan J. Brison. In Diana T. Meyers (ed.), Feminists Rethink the Self. Westview Press 12.
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  31.  9
    Cavendish Hooke, Jonathan Barnes, David William Bates & David Bloor (forthcoming). Abromeit, John. Max Horkheimer and the Foundations of the Frankfurt School. New York: Cambridge UP, 2011. Xiii, 441p., Bibl., Ill., Index, $95. Intellectual Biography of the Early and Middle Horkheimer, 1895–1941. Aıt-Touati, Frédérique. Fictions of the Cosmos: Science and Literature in the Seventeenth Century. Trans. Susan Emanuel. Chicago: U of Chicago P. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Ideas.
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  32.  14
    Carol Quinn (2000). Taking Seriously Victims of Unethical Experiments: Susan Brison's Conception of the Self and its Relevance to Bioethics. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (3):316–325.
  33.  5
    Soran Reader (2005). Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of a Self by Susan Brison. Princeton University Press. 2002. $29.25. Philosophy 80 (2):300-303.
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  34.  2
    M. Macdonald (1945). Men and Moral Principles. By L. Susan Stebbing. L. T. Hobhouse Memorial Trust Lecture No. 13. (Oxford University Press. 1944. Pp. 27. Price 2s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 20 (75):76-.
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  35. G. L'E. Turner (1974). Technology A History of Glassmaking. By R. W. Douglas and Susan Frank. Henley-on-Thames: G. T. Foulis, 1972. Pp. Xii + 213. £4.50. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 7 (3):291.
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  36. Nancy J. Hirschmann (2006). Response to Friedman and Brison. Hypatia 21 (4):201-211.
    Here, Hirschmann responds to Marilyn Friedman and Susan J. Brison's comments on The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom. She clarifies some aspects of her social construction argument, articulates the role of discourse and its relation to material reality, and explicates the potentially paradoxical case of support for women's choices when those choices produce harm.
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  37. Susan Schneider (2007). Yes, It Does: A Diatribe on Jerry Fodor's the Mind Doesn't Work That Way. Psyche.
    The Mind Doesn’t Work That Way is an expose of certain theoretical problems in cognitive science, and in particular, problems that concern the Classical Computational Theory of Mind (CTM). The problems that Fodor worries plague CTM divide into two kinds, and both purport to show that the success of cognitive science will likely be limited to the modules. The first sort of problem concerns what Fodor has called “global properties”; features that a mental sentence has which depend on how the (...)
     
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  38.  9
    Susan Gellman (1992). “Brother, You Can't Go to Jail for What You're Thinking”: Motives, Effects, and “Hate Crime” Laws. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):24-29.
    (1992). “Brother, you can't go to jail for what you're thinking”: Motives, effects, and “hate crime” laws. Criminal Justice Ethics: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 24-29. doi: 10.1080/0731129X.1992.9991919.
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  39.  6
    Susan Haack (2007). Crossing My I's and Dotting Some T's : Response to Vern Walker. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books
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  40.  19
    Gavin Huntley-Fenner, Susan Carey & Andrea Solimando (2002). Objects Are Individuals but Stuff Doesn't Count: Perceived Rigidity and Cohesiveness Influence Infants' Representations of Small Groups of Discrete Entities. Cognition 85 (3):203-221.
  41.  33
    Susan A. J. Stuart (2010). The Mindsized Mashup Mind Isn't Supersized After All. Analysis 70 (1):174-183.
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  42.  64
    Peter Swirski (2012). American Pragmatism and Poetic Practice: Crosscurrents From Emerson to Susan Howe by Kristen Case. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (3):396-399.
    From Aristotle's Poetics to contemporary aestheticians grappling with the politics and poetics of rap, intellectual traffic between philosophy and poetry has formed an appreciable undercurrent in the historical ebb and flow of cross-disciplinary bridge building. If anything, in the postwar years this undercurrent has only become more pronounced. Not to look too far, Wittgenstein himself admonished in Culture and Value that philosophy ought really to be written only as a form of poetic composition. Skeptics will, of course, take Wittgenstein with (...)
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  43.  21
    Susan B. Rubin (2007). If We Think It's Futile, Can't We Just Say No? HEC Forum 19 (1):45-65.
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  44. Susan Dwyer, How not to argue that morality isn't innate: Comments on Jesse Prinz's “is morality innate?”.
    We must admire the ambition of Prinz’s title question. But does he provide a convincing answer to it? Prinz’s own view of morality as “a byproduct – accidental or invented – of faculties that evolved for different purposes (1),” which appears to express a negative reply, does not receive much direct argument here. Rather, Prinz’s main aim is to try to show that the considerations he believes are typically presented by moral nativists are insufficient or inadequate to establish that morality (...)
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  45.  2
    Susan Feldman (1999). Please Don't Call Me 'Dear': Older Women's Narratives of Health Care. Nursing Inquiry 6 (4):269-276.
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  46.  15
    Susan I. Rotroff (2013). R.T. Neer Art & Archaeology of the Greek World. A New History, C. 2500–150 Bce. Pp. 400, B/W & Colour Ills, Colour Maps. London: Thames & Hudson, 2012. Cased, £35. ISBN: 978-0-500-05166-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):225-226.
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  47. T. O. J. Rawls (1994). Pp. 462-63. Susan Moller Okin Suggests That One Reasonable Interpretation of Rawls's PL is That It Requires That the Family Be Internally Subject to the Two Principles of Justice. So, Under This Interpretation, Patriarchal Family Forms Might Be Disallowed by Rawls's Theory. See Okin," Political Liberalism, Justice and Gender,". [REVIEW] In Peter Singer (ed.), Ethics. Oxford University Press 105--23.
     
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  48. Susan Hekman (1991). Review of Self, Society, and Personal Choice by Diana T. Meyers. [REVIEW] Hypatia 6 (2):222-25.
     
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  49.  7
    Tiziana Ligorio, Susan L. Epstein, Rebecca J. Passonneau & Joshua Gordon (forthcoming). What You Did and Didn't Mean: Noise, Context, and Human Skill. Cognitive Science.
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  50.  15
    Susan Downie (2009). (T.H.) Nielsen Olympia and the Classical Hellenic City-State Culture. (Historisk-Filosofiske Meddelelser 96.) Pp. 139, Ill. Copenhagen: The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters. Paper, DKr120. ISBN: 978-87-7304-309-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):308-.
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