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  1. Susan T. Gardner (2012). Love Them or Leave Them? Respect Requires Neither. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):253-268.
    The notion of “respect for persons” is a one often closely tied to the religious edict that “we ought to love one another.” It thus appears to give rise to a command that we are obliged to nurture some kind of positive regard toward others.Taking on a slightly different hue, Kant’s notion of “respect for persons” requires that we recognize universalizing agents as autonomous, and, hence, even if fanatical (Hare), we have no grounds to condemn.In this paper, both of these (...)
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  2. Susan T. Gardner (2012). Teaching Children to Think Ethically. Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 32 (2):75-81.
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  3. Susan T. Gardner (2009). Thinking Your Way to Freedom: A Guide to Owning Your Own Practical Reasoning. Temple University Press.
    A Teacher's Manual for this book will be available online at www.temple.edu/tempress.
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  4. Susan T. Gardner (2008). Agitating for Munificence or Going Out of Business. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 3:21-29.
    If you cannot, then you ought not. Taking its own precepts seriously, philosophy, in the face of scientific deterministic success, has abandoned its original calling of inspiring munificence and, in doing so, has undercut much of its own relevance. But this need not be the case. If we adopt a more finely grained set of theoretical glasses, we will see that human freedom is simply the icing on a deterministic layer cake that launches entities, both phylogenetically and ontogenetically, from the (...)
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  5. Susan T. Gardner (2008). Moving Beyond Universalizability. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:117-125.
    The use of Kant’s universalizability principle as a method of determining the warrantability of an ethical claim has two fundamental flaws. On the one hand, it renders the universalizing moralizer mute in the face of fanaticism, and, on the other, it too easily dissolves into irrational rule worship. In the face of such flaws,many have argued that this “rational” approach to ethics ought to be abandoned in favor of fanning the flames of sentiment. Such a proposal suggests that we have (...)
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