Search results for 'Sustainable development' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Volkert Beekman (2004). Sustainable Development and Future Generations. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (1):3-22.score: 90.0
    This paper argues, mainly on the basis of Rawls''s savings principle, Wissenburg''s restraint principle, Passmore's chains of love, and De-Shalit's transgenerational communities, for a double interpretation of sustainable development as a principle of intergenerational justice and a future-oriented green ideal. This double interpretation (1) embraces the restraint principle and the argument that no individualcan claim an unconditional right to destroy environmental goods as a baseline that could justify directive strategies for government intervention in non-sustainable lifestyles, and (2) (...)
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  2. Dinah M. Payne & Cecily A. Raiborn (2001). Sustainable Development: The Ethics Support the Economics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):157 - 168.score: 90.0
    Within their value chains of suppliers through customers, many businesses are becoming more aware of the environmental aspects and impacts of their organizations. Viewed as a continuum of behavior, business environmentalism can range from simply complying with the law to accepting and pursuing a goal of sustainable development. The point on the continuum at which an organization chooses to operate is reflected in its environmental mission, policies, and actions. Attributes of the various levels of behavior and classification of (...)
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  3. A. H. T. Fergus & J. I. A. Rowney (2005). Sustainable Development: Lost Meaning and Opportunity? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):17 - 27.score: 90.0
    The term Sustainable Development has been used in many different contexts and consequently has come to represent many different ideas. The purpose of this paper was to explore the underlying meaning of the term Sustainable Development, and to assess the dominant ethic behind such meaning. Through this exploration, we uncovered a change in the semantic meaning of the term, and described what that meaning entails. The term Sustainable Development had the potential, we argue, to (...)
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  4. Mert Bilgin (2009). The PEARL Model: Gaining Competitive Advantage Through Sustainable Development. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):545 - 554.score: 90.0
    This article formulates institutional virtues according to sustainable development (SD) criteria to come up with a paradigmatic set of corporate principles. It aims to answer how a corporation might obtain competitive advantage by combining "going ethical" with "going green." On the one hand, it brings out facts that indicate a forthcoming trend inclined to force relevant actors to comply with SD requirements. On the other hand, it suggests that SD may be implemented as a strategy to gain competitive (...)
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  5. Joseph R. Herkert (1998). Sustainable Development, Engineering and Multinational Corporations: Ethical and Public Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):333-346.score: 90.0
    This paper explores the concept of sustainable development and its ethical and public policy implications for engineering and multinational corporations. Sustainable development involves achieving objectives in three realms: ecological (sustainable scale), economic (efficient allocation) and social (just distribution). While movement toward a sustainable society is dependent upon satisfying all three objectives, questions of just distribution and other questions of equity are often left off the table or downplayed when engineers and corporate leaders consider (...) development issues. Indeed, almost all the effort of engineers and engineering organizations on the issue of sustainable development has been focused on striking a balance between economic development and environmental protection. Similarly, corporate approaches rely on technological fixes to the challenges posed by sustainable development. While there have been some efforts aimed at incorporating environmental and social equity concepts into engineering codes of ethics, social concerns have been secondary to environmental issues. The incongruity between the ideal of sustainable development and the way in which it is typically characterized by the engineering and business communities has significant implications for engineering and public policy, engineering ethics, and the potential roles of engineers and multinational corporations as facilitators of a transition to a sustainable society. (shrink)
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  6. David A. Lertzman & Harrie Vredenburg (2005). Indigenous Peoples, Resource Extraction and Sustainable Development: An Ethical Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):239 - 254.score: 90.0
    Resource extraction companies worldwide are involved with Indigenous peoples. Historically these interactions have been antagonistic, yet there is a growing public expectation for improved ethical performance of resource industries to engage with Indigenous peoples. (Crawley and Sinclair, Journal of Business Ethics 45, 361–373 (2003)) proposed an ethical model for human resource practices with Indigenous peoples in Australian mining companies. This paper expands on this work by re-framing the discussion within the context of sustainable development, extending it to Canada, (...)
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  7. Wing S. Chow & Yang Chen (2012). Corporate Sustainable Development: Testing a New Scale Based on the Mainland Chinese Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):519-533.score: 90.0
    According to the predominant corporate sustainable development (CSD) framework, this exploratory paper verifies that CSD construct can be modeled by integrating the dimensions of social, economic, and environmental development. We first developed and validated measurement scales for these three dimensions based on a survey of 314 managers in mainland China. Then, using structural equation modelling, we confirmed that the proposed model is valid. Therefore, our findings may allow researchers to explore CSD further, and practitioners to develop their (...)
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  8. Andrew H. T. Fergus & Julie I. A. Rowney (2005). Sustainable Development: Epistemological Frameworks & an Ethic of Choice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):197 - 207.score: 90.0
    As the second part of a research agenda addressing the idea and meaning of Sustainable Development, this paper responds to the challenges set in the first paper. Using a Foucaudian perspective, we uncover and highlight the importance of discourse in the development of societal context which could lead to the radical change in our epistemological thought necessary for Sustainable Development to reach its potential. By developing an argument for an epistemological change, we suggest that business (...)
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  9. Rüdiger Hahn (2009). The Ethical Rational of Business for the Poor – Integrating the Concepts Bottom of the Pyramid, Sustainable Development, and Corporate Citizenship. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):313 - 324.score: 90.0
    The first United Nations Millennium Development Goal calls for a distinct reduction of worldwide poverty. It is now widely accepted that the private sector is a crucial partner in achieving this ambitious target. Building on this insight, the ‹Bottom of the Pyramid’ concept provides a framework that highlights the untapped opportunities with the ‹poorest of the poor’, while at the same time acknowledging the abilities and resources of private enterprises for poverty alleviation. This article connects the idea of business (...)
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  10. Harrie Vredenburg (2011). Multinational Oil Companies and the Adoption of Sustainable Development: A Resource-Based and Institutional Theory Interpretation of Adoption Heterogeneity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):39-65.score: 90.0
    Sustainable development is often framed as a social issue to which corporations should pay attention because it offers both opportunities and challenges. Through the use of institutional theory and the resource-based view of the firm, we shed some light on why, more than 20 years after sustainable development was first introduced, we see neither the adoption of this business model as dominant nor its converse, that is the total abandonment of the model as unworkable and unprofitable. (...)
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  11. Frank P. LeVeness & Patrick D. Primeaux (2004). Vicarious Ethics: Politics, Business, and Sustainable Development. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):185-198.score: 90.0
    An historical overview of the United Nations sustainable development initiative reflects a convergence of political and ethical concerns, and a need to incorporate business and the ethics of business into an inclusive perspective. Underlying all of the resolutions and recommendations ensuing from that initiative is the age-old question of “the one and the many,” with which theology and philosophy have grappled for centuries, and sociology and politics in more recent times. Inherent to sustainable development is a (...)
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  12. Mario Giampietro & Sandra G. F. Bukkens (1992). Sustainable Development: Scientific and Ethical Assessments. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 5 (1):27-57.score: 90.0
    The problem of assessing the sustainability of human development is discussed in theoretical and practical terms.In Part I, two theoretical tools for describing the challenge of assessing sustainable development are introduced and briefly discussed: (i) the use of an energetic model to describe the dynamic interaction between the human and the biophysical compartment; (ii) basic concepts derived from the hierarchy theory applied to the development of human society. Sustainable and ethical development of human society (...)
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  13. Maria A. Martin, Pablo Martínez de Anguita & Miguel Acosta (2013). Analysis of the “European Charter on General Principles for Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development” The Council of Europe Document CO-DBP (2003)2. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):1037-1050.score: 90.0
    For almost 50 years, the Council of Europe through a series of documents has been helping to build up a set of rules, principles, and strategies related to culture, environment, ethics, and sustainable development. At the moment, one of the most important aims of the Council of Europe’s agenda deals with the elaboration of the General Principles for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development, as raised in document CO-DBP (2003)2 related to the environmental subject. (...)
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  14. Juana María Rivera-Lirio & María Jesús Muñoz-Torres (2010). The Effectiveness of the Public Support Policies for the European Industry Financing as a Contribution to Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):489 - 515.score: 90.0
    In recent years, the debate about the role of the Public Institutions in the fields of corporate social responsibility and sustainable development has gained momentum. Nevertheless, the ambiguity of the latter concepts makes it difficult both to measure them and to estimate the impact that the different public initiatives may have on them. In this sense, the present research has the aim to design a fuzzy logic-based methodology applied to the evaluation of the above-mentioned processes in relation to (...)
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  15. Mikael Karlsson (2003). Ethics of Sustainable Development – a Study of Swedish Regulations for Genetically Modified Organisms. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (1):51-62.score: 90.0
    In spite of stricter provisions inthe new EU directive on deliberate release ofgenetically modified organisms (GMOs), criticsstill advocate a moratorium on permits forcultivation of GMOs. However, in an attempt tomeet concerns raised by the public, thedirective explicitly gives Member States thepossibility to take into consideration ethicalaspects of GMOs in the decision-making. Thisarticle investigates the potential effects ofsuch formulation by means of an empiricalanalysis of experiences gained the last yearsfrom similar Swedish regulations for GMOs,aiming at promoting sustainable development.The faulty (...)
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  16. Anne Ingeborg Myhr & Terje Traavik (2003). Sustainable Development and Norwegian Genetic Engineering Regulations: Applications, Impacts, and Challenges. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (4):317-335.score: 90.0
    The main purpose of The NorwegianGene Technology Act (1993) is to enforcecontainment of genetically modified organisms(GMOs) and control of GMO releases.Furthermore, the Act intends to ensure that``production and use of GMOs should take placein an ethically and socially justifiable way,in accordance with the principle of sustainabledevelopment and without detrimental effects tohealth and the environment.'' Hence it isobvious that, for the Norwegian authorities,sustainable development is a normativeguideline when evaluating acceptableconsequences of GMO use and production. Inaccordance with this, we have (...)
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  17. Reinhard Steurer, Markus E. Langer, Astrid Konrad & André Martinuzzi (2005). Corporations, Stakeholders and Sustainable Development I: A Theoretical Exploration of Business–Society Relations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 61 (3):263 - 281.score: 90.0
    Sustainable development (SD) – that is, “Development that meets the needs of current generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs and aspirations” – can be pursued in many different ways. Stakeholder relations management (SRM) is one such way, through which corporations are confronted with economic, social, and environmental stakeholder claims. This paper lays the groundwork for an empirical analysis of the question of how far SD can be achieved through SRM. It describes (...)
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  18. Yvonne M. Scherrer (2009). Environmental Conservation NGOs and the Concept of Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):555-571.score: 90.0
    On the background of the widely known and controversially discussed concept of sustainable development and the ever increasing influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on social, environmental and economic issues, this article focuses on how NGOs, specialised in environmental protection and conservation issues, reacted to the holistic societal concept of sustainable development which aims at finding solutions not only to environmental, but also to social and economic issues. For this purpose, the article investigates whether and to what (...)
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  19. Yvonne M. Scherrer (2009). Environmental Conservation NGOs and the Concept of Sustainable Development: A Research Into the Value Systems of Greenpeace International, WWF International and IUCN International. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):555 - 571.score: 90.0
    On the background of the widely known and controversially discussed concept of sustainable development and the ever increasing influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on social, environmental and economic issues, this article focuses on how NGOs, specialised in environmental protection and conservation issues, reacted to the holistic societal concept of sustainable development which aims at finding solutions not only to environmental, but also to social and economic issues. For this purpose, the article investigates whether and to what (...)
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  20. Robert Geerts (2013). Dialogue on Sustainable Development as Part of Engineering Education: The Relevance of the Finnish Case. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1571-1576.score: 90.0
    Society invests in the education of engineers because it is expected that the works of engineers will bring good results for society. Because the work of engineers is not value free or neutral, it is important that engineers are educated in the important principles of the social sciences and humanities. This education is essential for the awareness and understanding of what is good for society. Therefore the concept of sustainable development should be part of an education in engineering (...)
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  21. Nancy Grudens-Schuck, Will Allen, Tasha M. Hargrove & Margaret Kilvington (2003). Renovating Dependency and Self-Reliance for Participatory Sustainable Development. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (1):53-64.score: 90.0
    Dependency stands for manygrievances and is generally considered asymptom of oppression. An opposing concept,offered as the preferred state, isself-reliance. Dependency and self-reliance arekey concepts in sustainable developmentprograms that feature participatory approaches.Some of the ways in which development projectsemploy the concepts of dependency andself-reliance, however, are troubling.Dependency and self-reliance in two programsfor participatory sustainable development areexamined, one in Canada and the other in NewZealand. Frameworks for dependency and self-reliance aredrawn from social psychology and philosophy toexamine problematic aspects (...)
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  22. Maria A. Martin, Pablo Martínez de Anguita & Miguel Acosta (2013). Analysis of the “European Charter on General Principles for Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development” The Council of Europe Document CO-DBP (2003)2. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):1037-1050.score: 90.0
    For almost 50 years, the Council of Europe through a series of documents has been helping to build up a set of rules, principles, and strategies related to culture, environment, ethics, and sustainable development. At the moment, one of the most important aims of the Council of Europe’s agenda deals with the elaboration of the General Principles for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development, as raised in document CO-DBP (2003)2 related to the environmental subject. (...)
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  23. Charles Verharen, John Tharakan, Flordeliz Bugarin, Joseph Fortunak, Gada Kadoda & George Middendorf (2014). Survival Ethics in the Real World: The Research University and Sustainable Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):135-154.score: 87.0
    We discuss how academically-based interdisciplinary teams can address the extreme challenges of the world’s poorest by increasing access to the basic necessities of life. The essay’s first part illustrates the evolving commitment of research universities to develop ethical solutions for populations whose survival is at risk and whose quality of life is deeply impaired. The second part proposes a rationale for university responsibility to solve the problems of impoverished populations at a geographical remove. It also presents a framework for integrating (...)
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  24. David R. Lea (1993). Melanesian Axiology, Communal Land Tenure, and the Prospect of Sustainable Development Within Papua New Guinea. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):89-101.score: 78.0
    It is the contention of this paper that some progress in alleviating the social and environmental problems which are beginning to face Papua New Guinea can be achieved by supporting traditional Melanesian values through maintaining the customary system of communal land tenure. In accordance with this aim, I will proceed to contrast certain Western attitudes towards individual freedom, selfinterested behaviour, individual and communal interests and private ownership with attitudes and values expressed in the traditional Melanesian approach. In order to demonstrate (...)
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  25. M. Victoria López, Arminda Garcia & Lazaro Rodriguez (2007). Sustainable Development and Corporate Performance: A Study Based on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):285 - 300.score: 76.0
    The goal of this paper is to examine whether business performance is affected by the adoption of practices included under the term Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). To achieve this goal, we analyse the relation between CSR and certain accounting indicators and examine whether there exist significant differences in performance indicators between European firms that have adopted CSR and others that have not. The effects of compliance with the requirements of CSR were determined on the basis of firms included in the (...)
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  26. Mao He & Juan Chen (2009). Sustainable Development and Corporate Environmental Responsibility: Evidence From Chinese Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):323-339.score: 75.0
    China is currently experiencing rapid economic growth. The price of this, however, is environment pollution. Many Chinese corporations are lacking in corporate environmental responsibility (CER). Therefore, this study employs data from Chinese and multinational corporations to identify why Chinese corporations seldom engage in CER by investigating their motivations and stakeholders. The results show that the most important reason why Chinese corporations do not engage in CER is the fact that their competitive strategy of cost cutting makes them limited in resources, (...)
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  27. Alan Irwin (1995). Citizen Science: A Study of People, Expertise, and Sustainable Development. Routledge.score: 75.0
    We are all concerned by the environmental threats facing us today. Environmental issues are a major area of concern for policy makers, industrialists and public groups of many different kinds. While science seems central to our understanding of such threats, the statements of scientists are increasingly open to challenge in this area. Meanwhile, citizens may find themselves labelled as "ignorant" in environmental matters. In Citizen Science Alan Irwin provides a much needed route through the fraught relationship between science, the public (...)
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  28. Sara Hajmohammad & Stephan Vachon (forthcoming). Safety Culture: A Catalyst for Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 75.0
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  29. Victor Olumekun & Emmanuel Ige (2011). Local Disposition to Environmental Protection, Poverty Alleviation and Other Issues in the Sustainable Development Agenda in Ondo State, Nigeria. Human Affairs 21 (3):294-303.score: 75.0
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  30. Fernando Dias Avila-Piredes, Luiz Carlos Mior, Vilênia Porto Aguiar & Susana Regina de Mello Schlemper (2000). The Concept of Sustainable Development Revisited. Foundations of Science 5 (3):261-268.score: 72.0
    The concept of sustainable development is here revised in the light of a brief historical analysis, followed by a semantic analysis of the expressions development and sustainability. The authors criticize the common use of this concept in a loose way or in wide generalizations, to conclude, based on the principles of human ecology, that it is only possible to make it operational in limited spans of time and in limited spatial units.
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  31. Paul T. M. Ingenbleek & Machiel J. Reinders (2013). The Development of a Market for Sustainable Coffee in The Netherlands: Rethinking the Contribution of Fair Trade. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):461-474.score: 72.0
    In recent years, researchers have observed the process of mainstreaming Fair Trade and the emergence of alternative sustainability standards in the coffee industry. The underlying market dynamics that have contributed to these developments are, however, under-researched. Insight into these dynamics is important to understand how markets can develop to favor sustainability. This study examines the major developments in the market for certified coffee in the Netherlands. It finds that, in the creation of a market for sustainable coffee, decisions that (...)
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  32. Gerd Michelsen (2013). Sustainable Development as a Challenge for Undergraduate Students: The Module “Science Bears Responsibility” in the Leuphana Bachelor's Programme. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1505-1511.score: 72.0
    The Leuphana Semester at Leuphana University Lüneburg, together with the module “Science bears responsibility” demonstrate how innovative methods of teaching and learning can be combined with the topic of sustainable development and how new forms of university teaching can be introduced. With regard to module content, it has become apparent that, due to the complexity of the field of sustainability, a single discipline alone is unable to provide analyses and solutions. If teaching in higher education is to adequately (...)
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  33. Daniel Puente-Rodríguez (2010). Biotechnologizing Jatropha for Local Sustainable Development. Agriculture and Human Values 27 (3):351-363.score: 72.0
    This article explores whether and how the biotechnologization process that the fuel-plant Jatropha curcas is undergoing might strengthen local sustainable development. It focuses on the ongoing efforts of the multi-stakeholder network Gota Verde to harness Jatropha within local small-scale production systems in Yoro, Honduras. It also looks at the genomics research on Jatropha conducted by the Dutch research institute Plant Research International, specifically addressing the ways in which that research can assists local development in Honduras. A territorial (...)
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  34. Marta G. Rivera-Ferre (2009). Can Export-Oriented Aquaculture in Developing Countries Be Sustainable and Promote Sustainable Development? The Shrimp Case. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):301-321.score: 63.0
    Industrial shrimp farming has been promoted by international development and financial institutions in coastal indebted poor countries as a way to obtain foreign exchange earnings, reimburse external debt, and promote development. The promotion of the shrimp industry is a clear example of a more general trend of support of export-oriented primary products, consisting in monocultures of commodities, as opposed to the promotion of more diverse, traditional production directed to feed the local population. In general, it is assumed that (...)
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  35. Raine Isaksson, Peter Johansson & Klaus Fischer (2010). Detecting Supply Chain Innovation Potential for Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (3):425 - 442.score: 62.0
    In a world of limited resources, it could be argued that companies that aspire to be good corporate citizens need to focus on making best use of resources. User value and environmental harm are created in supply chains and it could therefore be argued that company business ethics should be extended from the company to the entire value chain from the first supplier to the last customer. Starting with a delineation of the linkages between business ethics, corporate sustainability, and the (...)
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  36. Alice Mani (2013). Evolving Corporate Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Mysore Paper Mills Limited. [REVIEW] Asian Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.score: 62.0
    In 1987, the World Commission on Economic Development (WCED) popularized the term “sustainable development” in its well-cited report, Our Common Future. According to this report, sustainable development is defined as “the development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” The WCED asserted that sustainable development required simultaneous adoption of environmental, economical, and equity principles. Bansal (Strategic Management Journal, 26(3), 197–218, 2005) (...)
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  37. Julie L. Davidson (2000). Sustainable Development: Business as Usual or a New Way of Living? Environmental Ethics 22 (1):25-42.score: 60.0
    In the eighteenth century, the economic problem was reformulated according to a particular set of politico-economic components, in which the pursuit of individual freedom was elevated to an ethical and political ideal. Subsequent developments of this individualist philosophy together with the achievements of technological progress now appear as a threat to future existence. Extensive environmentaldegradation and persistent global inequalities of wealth demand a new reformulation of the economic problem. Sustainable development has emerged as the most recent economic strategy (...)
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  38. Emery Roe (1997). Sustainable Development and the Local Justice Framework. Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (2):97-114.score: 60.0
    Jon Elster's notion of 'local justice systems' helps recon ceive sustainable development in several fresh ways. Keeping options open for the future use of resources turns out to be a justice/injustice cycle: the more sustainable development becomes a global phenom enon, the more locally unjust its uniform application would necess arily be. The more uniform the application, the greater the local pressure for suitably varied alternatives. But the more varied the applications, the greater the chance of (...)
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  39. Joanna Becker (2007). How Frameworks Can Help Operationalize Sustainable Development Indicators. World Futures 63 (2):137 – 150.score: 60.0
    After nearly three decades of discussion about sustainable development are we any nearer to achieving it? And do we even know what a sustainable world will look like for future generations? Early definitions of sustainable development were so broad as to allow a range of interpretations based largely on individual interests and anthropocentric needs. We are measuring the performance of countless indicators of sustainable development, but is this more an exercise in applying data (...)
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  40. R. Edward Grumbine (1994). Wildness, Wise Use, and Sustainable Development. Environmental Ethics 16 (3):227-249.score: 60.0
    Ideas of wilderness in North America are evolving toward some new configuration. Current wilderness ideology, among other weaknesses, has been charged with encouraging a radical separation between people and nature and with being inadequate to serve the protection of biodiversity. Sustainable development and “wise use” privatization of wildlands have been offered as alternatives to the Western wilderness concept. I review this wilderness debate and argue that critical distinctions between wildness and wilderness and self and other must be settled (...)
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  41. Fernando Dias de Avila-Pires, Luiz Carlos Mior, Vilênia Porto Aguiar & Susana Regina Mello Schlempeder (2000). The Concept of Sustainable Development Revisited. Foundations of Science 5 (3).score: 60.0
    The concept of sustainable development is here revised in the light of a brief historical analysis, followed by a semantic analysis of the expressions development and sustainability. The authors criticize the common use of this concept in a loose way or in wide generalizations, to conclude, based on the principles of human ecology, that it is only possible to make it operational in limited spans of time and in limited spatial units.
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  42. Wilfred Beckerman (1994). 'Sustainable Development': Is It a Useful Concept? Environmental Values 3 (3):191 - 209.score: 60.0
    It is argued that 'sustainable development' has been defined in such a way as to be either morally repugnant or logically redundant. 'Strong' sustainability, overriding all other considerations, is morally unacceptable as well as totally impractical; and 'weak' sustainability, in which compensation is made for resources consumed, offers nothing beyond traditional economic welfare maximisation. The 'sustainability' requirement that human well-being should never be allowed to decline is shown to be irrational. Welfare economics can accommodate distributional considerations, and, suitably (...)
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  43. Georg Brun & Gertrude Hirsch Hadorn (2007). Ranking Policy Options for Sustainable Development. Poiesis and Praxis 5 (1):15-31.score: 60.0
    Sustainable development calls for choices among alternative policy options. It is a common view that such choices can be justified by appealing to an evaluative ranking of the options with respect to how their consequences affect a broad range of prudential and moral values. Three philosophically motivated proposals for analysing evaluative rankings are discussed: the measured merits model (e.g. Chang), the ordered values model (e.g. Griffin), and the permissible preference orderings model (Rabinowicz). The analysis focuses on the models’ (...)
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  44. M. Haque (2000). Environmental Discourse and Sustainable Development Linkages and Limitations. Ethics and the Environment 5 (1):3-21.score: 60.0
    In the development field, one of the major shortcomings of mainstream development theories and models is their relative indifference toward environmental concerns. However, the worsening environmental catastrophes and the growing environmental consciousness led to the emergence of a new model of development known as "sustainable development." The proponents of sustainable development tend to explore the environmental costs of development activities, prescribe environment-friendly policies, suggest institutional and legal measures for environmental protection, and publicize (...)
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  45. E. M. Young (1999). Far-Fetched Meals and Indigestible Discourses: Reflections on Ethics, Globalisation, Hunger and Sustainable Development. Philosophy and Geography 2 (1):19 – 40.score: 60.0
    Analyses of the 'food business' expose some of the most fascinating and disturbing characteristics of contemporary capitalism as well as some of the most significant flaws within contemporary academic discourses; deficiencies in diets are the material manifestations of the deficiencies in common analytical and conceptual categories as well as political will. Much of the voluminous recent discourse about sustainable development is similarly flawed. This paper reflects on the connections between the character of contemporary capitalism and allied discourses on (...)
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  46. Robin Attfield (2007). Sustainable Development Revisited. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:185-189.score: 60.0
    My aim is to defend the concept of sustainable development both against economists' interpretations that make it involve perpetual gains to human well-being, and against sceptical accounts that make its meaning vary from speaker to speaker, serving as a cloak for the status quo and the suggestion that it be discarded. The assumptions of the economists' interpretation are questioned, and the centrality among early advocates of sustainable development of sustainable practices and of sustainability being social (...)
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  47. Yuri Krista (2003). Information-Hierarchical Organization of Mankind and Problems of its Sustainable Development. World Futures 59 (6):401 – 419.score: 60.0
    The information-hierarchical approach is used to analyze the evolutionary developed organization of mankind. This organization is shown to be hierarchical, from molecular hierarchical levels to the religious ones. Time cycles of each level operation are included in the greater cycle of the next level according to the specific schemes defined by the common information principle of natural system development. Time cycles of levels have duration of 1 second, 6 seconds, 42 seconds, 24 hours, 11 days, 1 years, 33 year, (...)
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  48. W. Mckinney (2000). Of Sustainability and Precaution The Logical, Epistemological, and Moral Problems of the Precautionary Principle and Their Implications for Sustainable Development. Ethics and the Environment 5 (1):77-87.score: 60.0
    From the convening of the Brundtland Commission in 1983 to the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development and beyond, sustainable development has been one of the core issues facing environmental ethicists and policymakers. The challenge facing both policy makers and ethicists has been to ascertain the proper formulation and implementation of sustainable development practices either within the present global market economy or within a new, more ecological, paradigm. This analysis, however, takes a slightly different (...)
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  49. Paul G. Harris (1997). Affluence, Poverty, and Ecology: Obligation, International Relations, and Sustainable Development. Ethics and the Environment 2 (2):121 - 138.score: 60.0
    Effective efforts to protect the global environment will require the willing cooperation of the world's poor. Persuading them to join international environmental agreements and to choose environmentally sustainable development requires substantial concessions from the affluent industrialized countries, including additional financial assistance and technology transfers. The affluent countries ought to provide such assistance to the world's poor for ethical reasons. Doing so would promote transnational distributive justice, which is defined here as a fair and equitable distribution among countries of (...)
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  50. Oluf Langhelle (2000). Sustainable Development and Social Justice: Expanding the Rawlsian Framework of Global Justice. Environmental Values 9 (3):295 - 323.score: 60.0
    This article makes two arguments. First, that social justice constitutes an inherent part of the conception of sustainable development that the World Commission on Environment and Development outlined in Our Common Future (1987). The primary goal of the Commission was to reconcile physical sustainability, need satisfaction and equal opportunities, within and between generations. Sustainable development is what defines this reconciliation. Second, it is argued that this conception of sustainable development is broadly compatible with (...)
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