Search results for 'Sustainable development' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Eric Palmer, Public Consultation and the 2030 Agenda: Sustaining Commentary for the Sustainable Development Goals.
    (Pre-publication draft November 2015: Partial content of "Introduction: The 2030 Agenda," Journal of Global Ethics 11:3 [December 2015], 262-270) This introduction briefly explains the process through which the Sustainable Development Goals have developed from their receipt in 2014 to their passage in September 2015 by the UN General Assembly, and it considers their development in prospect. The Millennium Development Goals, which spanned 1990-2015, present a case study that reveals the changeability of such long-term multilateral commitments. They (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  43
    Reinhard Steurer, Markus E. Langer, Astrid Konrad & André Martinuzzi (2005). Corporations, Stakeholders and Sustainable Development I: A Theoretical Exploration of Business–Society Relations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 61 (3):263 - 281.
    Sustainable development (SD) – that is, “Development that meets the needs of current generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs and aspirations” – can be pursued in many different ways. Stakeholder relations management (SRM) is one such way, through which corporations are confronted with economic, social, and environmental stakeholder claims. This paper lays the groundwork for an empirical analysis of the question of how far SD can be achieved through SRM. It describes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  3.  25
    Rüdiger Hahn (2009). The Ethical Rational of Business for the Poor – Integrating the Concepts Bottom of the Pyramid, Sustainable Development, and Corporate Citizenship. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):313 - 324.
    The first United Nations Millennium Development Goal calls for a distinct reduction of worldwide poverty. It is now widely accepted that the private sector is a crucial partner in achieving this ambitious target. Building on this insight, the ‹Bottom of the Pyramid’ concept provides a framework that highlights the untapped opportunities with the ‹poorest of the poor’, while at the same time acknowledging the abilities and resources of private enterprises for poverty alleviation. This article connects the idea of business (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  4.  52
    Dinah M. Payne & Cecily A. Raiborn (2001). Sustainable Development: The Ethics Support the Economics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):157 - 168.
    Within their value chains of suppliers through customers, many businesses are becoming more aware of the environmental aspects and impacts of their organizations. Viewed as a continuum of behavior, business environmentalism can range from simply complying with the law to accepting and pursuing a goal of sustainable development. The point on the continuum at which an organization chooses to operate is reflected in its environmental mission, policies, and actions. Attributes of the various levels of behavior and classification of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  5.  78
    Volkert Beekman (2004). Sustainable Development and Future Generations. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (1):3-22.
    This paper argues, mainly on the basis of Rawls''s savings principle, Wissenburg''s restraint principle, Passmore's chains of love, and De-Shalit's transgenerational communities, for a double interpretation of sustainable development as a principle of intergenerational justice and a future-oriented green ideal. This double interpretation (1) embraces the restraint principle and the argument that no individualcan claim an unconditional right to destroy environmental goods as a baseline that could justify directive strategies for government intervention in non-sustainable lifestyles, and (2) (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  6.  41
    Wing S. Chow & Yang Chen (2012). Corporate Sustainable Development: Testing a New Scale Based on the Mainland Chinese Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):519-533.
    According to the predominant corporate sustainable development (CSD) framework, this exploratory paper verifies that CSD construct can be modeled by integrating the dimensions of social, economic, and environmental development. We first developed and validated measurement scales for these three dimensions based on a survey of 314 managers in mainland China. Then, using structural equation modelling, we confirmed that the proposed model is valid. Therefore, our findings may allow researchers to explore CSD further, and practitioners to develop their (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  60
    A. H. T. Fergus & J. I. A. Rowney (2005). Sustainable Development: Lost Meaning and Opportunity? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):17 - 27.
    The term Sustainable Development has been used in many different contexts and consequently has come to represent many different ideas. The purpose of this paper was to explore the underlying meaning of the term Sustainable Development, and to assess the dominant ethic behind such meaning. Through this exploration, we uncovered a change in the semantic meaning of the term, and described what that meaning entails. The term Sustainable Development had the potential, we argue, to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  8.  23
    Andrew H. T. Fergus & Julie I. A. Rowney (2005). Sustainable Development: Epistemological Frameworks & an Ethic of Choice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):197 - 207.
    As the second part of a research agenda addressing the idea and meaning of Sustainable Development, this paper responds to the challenges set in the first paper. Using a Foucaudian perspective, we uncover and highlight the importance of discourse in the development of societal context which could lead to the radical change in our epistemological thought necessary for Sustainable Development to reach its potential. By developing an argument for an epistemological change, we suggest that business (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  9.  20
    Ksenia Gerasimova (2016). Debates on Genetically Modified Crops in the Context of Sustainable Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):525-547.
    The paper discusses conflicts in perceptions of GM crops illustrating the complexities of GM debates and applications of the concept of sustainable development. The concept consists of three discourses that both opponents and supporters of GM crops refer to in their analyses: environmentalism, social and economic development and the two sub-issues of sustainable development—biodiversity loss and food security. This creates a unique situation when both proponents and opponents of GM food use the same framework of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  27
    David A. Lertzman & Harrie Vredenburg (2005). Indigenous Peoples, Resource Extraction and Sustainable Development: An Ethical Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):239 - 254.
    Resource extraction companies worldwide are involved with Indigenous peoples. Historically these interactions have been antagonistic, yet there is a growing public expectation for improved ethical performance of resource industries to engage with Indigenous peoples. (Crawley and Sinclair, Journal of Business Ethics 45, 361–373 (2003)) proposed an ethical model for human resource practices with Indigenous peoples in Australian mining companies. This paper expands on this work by re-framing the discussion within the context of sustainable development, extending it to Canada, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  11.  16
    Anne Ingeborg Myhr & Terje Traavik (2003). Sustainable Development and Norwegian Genetic Engineering Regulations: Applications, Impacts, and Challenges. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (4):317-335.
    The main purpose of The NorwegianGene Technology Act (1993) is to enforcecontainment of genetically modified organisms(GMOs) and control of GMO releases.Furthermore, the Act intends to ensure that``production and use of GMOs should take placein an ethically and socially justifiable way,in accordance with the principle of sustainabledevelopment and without detrimental effects tohealth and the environment.'' Hence it isobvious that, for the Norwegian authorities,sustainable development is a normativeguideline when evaluating acceptableconsequences of GMO use and production. Inaccordance with this, we have (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12.  3
    Robert Geerts (2013). Dialogue on Sustainable Development as Part of Engineering Education: The Relevance of the Finnish Case. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1571-1576.
    Society invests in the education of engineers because it is expected that the works of engineers will bring good results for society. Because the work of engineers is not value free or neutral, it is important that engineers are educated in the important principles of the social sciences and humanities. This education is essential for the awareness and understanding of what is good for society. Therefore the concept of sustainable development should be part of an education in engineering (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  4
    Damien Roiland (2016). Frugality, A Positive Principle to Promote Sustainable Development. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):571-585.
    Thinking and acting in favor of sustainable development is internationally recognized; it is necessary but societies and individuals are slow to adopt an appropriate behavior. International organizations such as World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology recommend to opt for frugality, a principle emphasized to avoid over-consumption and consequently the depletion of natural resources. This article thus examines the principle of frugality by proving that it is not necessarily related to consumption as it is understood (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  41
    Joseph R. Herkert (1998). Sustainable Development, Engineering and Multinational Corporations: Ethical and Public Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):333-346.
    This paper explores the concept of sustainable development and its ethical and public policy implications for engineering and multinational corporations. Sustainable development involves achieving objectives in three realms: ecological (sustainable scale), economic (efficient allocation) and social (just distribution). While movement toward a sustainable society is dependent upon satisfying all three objectives, questions of just distribution and other questions of equity are often left off the table or downplayed when engineers and corporate leaders consider (...) development issues. Indeed, almost all the effort of engineers and engineering organizations on the issue of sustainable development has been focused on striking a balance between economic development and environmental protection. Similarly, corporate approaches rely on technological fixes to the challenges posed by sustainable development. While there have been some efforts aimed at incorporating environmental and social equity concepts into engineering codes of ethics, social concerns have been secondary to environmental issues. The incongruity between the ideal of sustainable development and the way in which it is typically characterized by the engineering and business communities has significant implications for engineering and public policy, engineering ethics, and the potential roles of engineers and multinational corporations as facilitators of a transition to a sustainable society. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  15.  3
    Yvonne M. Scherrer (2009). Environmental Conservation NGOs and the Concept of Sustainable Development: A Research Into the Value Systems of Greenpeace International, WWF International and IUCN International. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):555 - 571.
    On the background of the widely known and controversially discussed concept of sustainable development and the ever increasing influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on social, environmental and economic issues, this article focuses on how NGOs, specialised in environmental protection and conservation issues, reacted to the holistic societal concept of sustainable development which aims at finding solutions not only to environmental, but also to social and economic issues. For this purpose, the article investigates whether and to what (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  27
    Mikael Karlsson (2003). Ethics of Sustainable Development – a Study of Swedish Regulations for Genetically Modified Organisms. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (1):51-62.
    In spite of stricter provisions inthe new EU directive on deliberate release ofgenetically modified organisms (GMOs), criticsstill advocate a moratorium on permits forcultivation of GMOs. However, in an attempt tomeet concerns raised by the public, thedirective explicitly gives Member States thepossibility to take into consideration ethicalaspects of GMOs in the decision-making. Thisarticle investigates the potential effects ofsuch formulation by means of an empiricalanalysis of experiences gained the last yearsfrom similar Swedish regulations for GMOs,aiming at promoting sustainable development.The faulty (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  14
    Maria A. Martin, Pablo Martínez de Anguita & Miguel Acosta (2013). Analysis of the “European Charter on General Principles for Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development” The Council of Europe Document CO-DBP (2003)2. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):1037-1050.
    For almost 50 years, the Council of Europe through a series of documents has been helping to build up a set of rules, principles, and strategies related to culture, environment, ethics, and sustainable development. At the moment, one of the most important aims of the Council of Europe’s agenda deals with the elaboration of the General Principles for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development, as raised in document CO-DBP (2003)2 related to the environmental subject. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  41
    Mert Bilgin (2009). The PEARL Model: Gaining Competitive Advantage Through Sustainable Development. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):545 - 554.
    This article formulates institutional virtues according to sustainable development (SD) criteria to come up with a paradigmatic set of corporate principles. It aims to answer how a corporation might obtain competitive advantage by combining "going ethical" with "going green." On the one hand, it brings out facts that indicate a forthcoming trend inclined to force relevant actors to comply with SD requirements. On the other hand, it suggests that SD may be implemented as a strategy to gain competitive (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  15
    Maria A. Martin, Pablo Martínez de Anguita & Miguel Acosta (2013). Analysis of the “European Charter on General Principles for Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development” The Council of Europe Document CO-DBP (2003)2. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):1037-1050.
    For almost 50 years, the Council of Europe through a series of documents has been helping to build up a set of rules, principles, and strategies related to culture, environment, ethics, and sustainable development. At the moment, one of the most important aims of the Council of Europe’s agenda deals with the elaboration of the General Principles for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development, as raised in document CO-DBP (2003)2 related to the environmental subject. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  28
    Harrie Vredenburg (2011). Multinational Oil Companies and the Adoption of Sustainable Development: A Resource-Based and Institutional Theory Interpretation of Adoption Heterogeneity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):39-65.
    Sustainable development is often framed as a social issue to which corporations should pay attention because it offers both opportunities and challenges. Through the use of institutional theory and the resource-based view of the firm, we shed some light on why, more than 20 years after sustainable development was first introduced, we see neither the adoption of this business model as dominant nor its converse, that is the total abandonment of the model as unworkable and unprofitable. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  30
    Frank P. LeVeness & Patrick D. Primeaux (2004). Vicarious Ethics: Politics, Business, and Sustainable Development. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):185-198.
    An historical overview of the United Nations sustainable development initiative reflects a convergence of political and ethical concerns, and a need to incorporate business and the ethics of business into an inclusive perspective. Underlying all of the resolutions and recommendations ensuing from that initiative is the age-old question of “the one and the many,” with which theology and philosophy have grappled for centuries, and sociology and politics in more recent times. Inherent to sustainable development is a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  9
    Nancy Grudens-Schuck, Will Allen, Tasha M. Hargrove & Margaret Kilvington (2003). Renovating Dependency and Self-Reliance for Participatory Sustainable Development. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (1):53-64.
    Dependency stands for manygrievances and is generally considered asymptom of oppression. An opposing concept,offered as the preferred state, isself-reliance. Dependency and self-reliance arekey concepts in sustainable developmentprograms that feature participatory approaches.Some of the ways in which development projectsemploy the concepts of dependency andself-reliance, however, are troubling.Dependency and self-reliance in two programsfor participatory sustainable development areexamined, one in Canada and the other in NewZealand. Frameworks for dependency and self-reliance aredrawn from social psychology and philosophy toexamine problematic aspects (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  5
    Victor Olumekun & Emmanuel Ige (2011). Local Disposition to Environmental Protection, Poverty Alleviation and Other Issues in the Sustainable Development Agenda in Ondo State, Nigeria. Human Affairs 21 (3):294-303.
    Sustainable development is the global agenda designed to ensure that the world’s climate is not irretrievably damaged and future generations have equal access to the world’s resources for their own development. The institutionalisation of measures to promote sustainable development has however not had unanimous cooperation. This study therefore investigated the attitude of officials at the local government level to topical issues in the sustainable development agenda in Ondo State, Nigeria, as a pointer to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  16
    Mario Giampietro & Sandra G. F. Bukkens (1992). Sustainable Development: Scientific and Ethical Assessments. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 5 (1):27-57.
    The problem of assessing the sustainability of human development is discussed in theoretical and practical terms.In Part I, two theoretical tools for describing the challenge of assessing sustainable development are introduced and briefly discussed: (i) the use of an energetic model to describe the dynamic interaction between the human and the biophysical compartment; (ii) basic concepts derived from the hierarchy theory applied to the development of human society. Sustainable and ethical development of human society (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  12
    Juana María Rivera-Lirio & María Jesús Muñoz-Torres (2010). The Effectiveness of the Public Support Policies for the European Industry Financing as a Contribution to Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):489 - 515.
    In recent years, the debate about the role of the Public Institutions in the fields of corporate social responsibility and sustainable development has gained momentum. Nevertheless, the ambiguity of the latter concepts makes it difficult both to measure them and to estimate the impact that the different public initiatives may have on them. In this sense, the present research has the aim to design a fuzzy logic-based methodology applied to the evaluation of the above-mentioned processes in relation to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  12
    Yvonne M. Scherrer (2009). Environmental Conservation NGOs and the Concept of Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):555-571.
    On the background of the widely known and controversially discussed concept of sustainable development and the ever increasing influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on social, environmental and economic issues, this article focuses on how NGOs, specialised in environmental protection and conservation issues, reacted to the holistic societal concept of sustainable development which aims at finding solutions not only to environmental, but also to social and economic issues. For this purpose, the article investigates whether and to what (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  14
    Charles Verharen, John Tharakan, Flordeliz Bugarin, Joseph Fortunak, Gada Kadoda & George Middendorf (2014). Survival Ethics in the Real World: The Research University and Sustainable Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):135-154.
    We discuss how academically-based interdisciplinary teams can address the extreme challenges of the world’s poorest by increasing access to the basic necessities of life. The essay’s first part illustrates the evolving commitment of research universities to develop ethical solutions for populations whose survival is at risk and whose quality of life is deeply impaired. The second part proposes a rationale for university responsibility to solve the problems of impoverished populations at a geographical remove. It also presents a framework for integrating (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  61
    M. Victoria López, Arminda Garcia & Lazaro Rodriguez (2007). Sustainable Development and Corporate Performance: A Study Based on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):285 - 300.
    The goal of this paper is to examine whether business performance is affected by the adoption of practices included under the term Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). To achieve this goal, we analyse the relation between CSR and certain accounting indicators and examine whether there exist significant differences in performance indicators between European firms that have adopted CSR and others that have not. The effects of compliance with the requirements of CSR were determined on the basis of firms included in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  29.  24
    Alan Irwin (1995). Citizen Science: A Study of People, Expertise, and Sustainable Development. Routledge.
    We are all concerned by the environmental threats facing us today. Environmental issues are a major area of concern for policy makers, industrialists and public groups of many different kinds. While science seems central to our understanding of such threats, the statements of scientists are increasingly open to challenge in this area. Meanwhile, citizens may find themselves labelled as "ignorant" in environmental matters. In Citizen Science Alan Irwin provides a much needed route through the fraught relationship between science, the public (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  30.  24
    David R. Lea (1993). Melanesian Axiology, Communal Land Tenure, and the Prospect of Sustainable Development Within Papua New Guinea. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):89-101.
    It is the contention of this paper that some progress in alleviating the social and environmental problems which are beginning to face Papua New Guinea can be achieved by supporting traditional Melanesian values through maintaining the customary system of communal land tenure. In accordance with this aim, I will proceed to contrast certain Western attitudes towards individual freedom, selfinterested behaviour, individual and communal interests and private ownership with attitudes and values expressed in the traditional Melanesian approach. In order to demonstrate (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  13
    Sara Hajmohammad & Stephan Vachon (2014). Safety Culture: A Catalyst for Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):263-281.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  3
    Ruth Thomas-Pellicer (2016). Dystopian Contemporary Positions: Sustainable Development as an Instance of the Epistemological Disposition. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):309-335.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  43
    Mao He & Juan Chen (2009). Sustainable Development and Corporate Environmental Responsibility: Evidence From Chinese Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):323-339.
    China is currently experiencing rapid economic growth. The price of this, however, is environment pollution. Many Chinese corporations are lacking in corporate environmental responsibility (CER). Therefore, this study employs data from Chinese and multinational corporations to identify why Chinese corporations seldom engage in CER by investigating their motivations and stakeholders. The results show that the most important reason why Chinese corporations do not engage in CER is the fact that their competitive strategy of cost cutting makes them limited in resources, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Keekok Lee, A. J. Holland & Desmond Mcneill (2000). Global Sustainable Development in the Twenty-First Century.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  6
    Gerd Michelsen (2013). Sustainable Development as a Challenge for Undergraduate Students: The Module “Science Bears Responsibility” in the Leuphana Bachelor's Programme. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1505-1511.
    The Leuphana Semester at Leuphana University Lüneburg, together with the module “Science bears responsibility” demonstrate how innovative methods of teaching and learning can be combined with the topic of sustainable development and how new forms of university teaching can be introduced. With regard to module content, it has become apparent that, due to the complexity of the field of sustainability, a single discipline alone is unable to provide analyses and solutions. If teaching in higher education is to adequately (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  8
    Daniel Puente-Rodríguez (2010). Biotechnologizing Jatropha for Local Sustainable Development. Agriculture and Human Values 27 (3):351-363.
    This article explores whether and how the biotechnologization process that the fuel-plant Jatropha curcas is undergoing might strengthen local sustainable development. It focuses on the ongoing efforts of the multi-stakeholder network Gota Verde to harness Jatropha within local small-scale production systems in Yoro, Honduras. It also looks at the genomics research on Jatropha conducted by the Dutch research institute Plant Research International, specifically addressing the ways in which that research can assists local development in Honduras. A territorial (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  14
    Fernando Dias Avila-Piredes, Luiz Carlos Mior, Vilênia Porto Aguiar & Susana Regina de Mello Schlemper (2000). The Concept of Sustainable Development Revisited. Foundations of Science 5 (3):261-268.
    The concept of sustainable development is here revised in the light of a brief historical analysis, followed by a semantic analysis of the expressions development and sustainability. The authors criticize the common use of this concept in a loose way or in wide generalizations, to conclude, based on the principles of human ecology, that it is only possible to make it operational in limited spans of time and in limited spatial units.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. R. Edward Grumbine (1994). Wildness, Wise Use, and Sustainable Development. Environmental Ethics 16 (3):227-249.
    Ideas of wilderness in North America are evolving toward some new configuration. Current wilderness ideology, among other weaknesses, has been charged with encouraging a radical separation between people and nature and with being inadequate to serve the protection of biodiversity. Sustainable development and “wise use” privatization of wildlands have been offered as alternatives to the Western wilderness concept. I review this wilderness debate and argue that critical distinctions between wildness and wilderness and self and other must be settled (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  16
    Paul T. M. Ingenbleek & Machiel J. Reinders (2013). The Development of a Market for Sustainable Coffee in The Netherlands: Rethinking the Contribution of Fair Trade. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):461-474.
    In recent years, researchers have observed the process of mainstreaming Fair Trade and the emergence of alternative sustainability standards in the coffee industry. The underlying market dynamics that have contributed to these developments are, however, under-researched. Insight into these dynamics is important to understand how markets can develop to favor sustainability. This study examines the major developments in the market for certified coffee in the Netherlands. It finds that, in the creation of a market for sustainable coffee, decisions that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  42
    Marta G. Rivera-Ferre (2009). Can Export-Oriented Aquaculture in Developing Countries Be Sustainable and Promote Sustainable Development? The Shrimp Case. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):301-321.
    Industrial shrimp farming has been promoted by international development and financial institutions in coastal indebted poor countries as a way to obtain foreign exchange earnings, reimburse external debt, and promote development. The promotion of the shrimp industry is a clear example of a more general trend of support of export-oriented primary products, consisting in monocultures of commodities, as opposed to the promotion of more diverse, traditional production directed to feed the local population. In general, it is assumed that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  76
    Eric Palmer (2015). Introduction: The Sustainable Development Goals Forum. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):3-9.
    (Article part 1 of 2) This introduction notes the contributions of various authors to the first issue of the Journal of Global Ethics 2015 Forum and briefly explains the United Nations process through which the sustainable development goals have been formulated up to the receipt by the General Assembly, in August 2014, of the Report of the Open Working Group of the General Assembly on Sustainable Development Goals. The goals are identified as a confluence of distinct (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  4
    Luis Camacho (2015). Sustainable Development Goals: Kinds, Connections and Expectations. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):18-23.
    We point out the need to clarify some of the ideas related to the connection between development and sustainability in the Report of the Open Working Group of the General Assembly on Sustainable Development. In particular, the meaning of ‘sustainable’ is not clear when applied to specific areas of human activity. A more detailed explanation of the kind of equality sought for in the proposal is also needed. Because of potential conflicts between goals, we miss some (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43. R. Edward Grumbine (1994). Wildness, Wise Use, and Sustainable Development. Environmental Ethics 16 (3):227-249.
    Ideas of wilderness in North America are evolving toward some new configuration. Current wilderness ideology, among other weaknesses, has been charged with encouraging a radical separation between people and nature and with being inadequate to serve the protection of biodiversity. Sustainable development and “wise use” privatization of wildlands have been offered as alternatives to the Western wilderness concept. I review this wilderness debate and argue that critical distinctions between wildness and wilderness and self and other must be settled (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  18
    Thomas Pogge & Mitu Sengupta (2015). The Sustainable Development Goals: A Plan for Building a Better World? Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):56-64.
    Despite some clear positives, the draft text of the Sustainable Development Goals does not fulfill its self-proclaimed purpose of inspiring and guiding a concerted international effort to eradicate severe poverty everywhere in all of its forms. We offer some critical comments on the proposed agreement and suggest 10 ways to embolden the goals and amplify their appeal and moral power. While it may well be true that the world's poor are better off today than their predecessors were decades (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  3
    Clara Brandi (2015). Safeguarding the Earth System as a Priority for Sustainable Development and Global Ethics: The Need for an Earth System SDG. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):32-36.
    While the list of 17 Sustainable Development Goals proposed by the United Nations’ Open Working Group comprises a catalog of highly important post-2015 development priorities, one of the key issue that has not received the attention it deserves is the need to safeguard the Earth's life-support system. Over the course of the past decades, we have concentrated much more on socioeconomic development rather than on environmental sustainability while putting a number of the Earth's systems at risk, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  38
    Raine Isaksson, Peter Johansson & Klaus Fischer (2010). Detecting Supply Chain Innovation Potential for Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (3):425 - 442.
    In a world of limited resources, it could be argued that companies that aspire to be good corporate citizens need to focus on making best use of resources. User value and environmental harm are created in supply chains and it could therefore be argued that company business ethics should be extended from the company to the entire value chain from the first supplier to the last customer. Starting with a delineation of the linkages between business ethics, corporate sustainability, and the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47. Berhanu Nega (2010). No Shortcut to Stability: Democratic Accountability and Sustainable Development in Ethiopia. Social Research: An International Quarterly 77 (4):1401-1446.
    The link between broad based economic prosperity, political stability and accountable governance is generally acknowledged as a reasonable proposition to explain the wealth and poverty of nations. Although there is continuing debate about what accountable governance actually imply and the degree to which government accountability is related to the democratic nature of the state, there is a broad consensus that political stability is an important precondition for durable development. Modern Ethiopian history is nothing but a story of economic decline, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  51
    Julie L. Davidson (2000). Sustainable Development: Business as Usual or a New Way of Living? Environmental Ethics 22 (1):25-42.
    In the eighteenth century, the economic problem was reformulated according to a particular set of politico-economic components, in which the pursuit of individual freedom was elevated to an ethical and political ideal. Subsequent developments of this individualist philosophy together with the achievements of technological progress now appear as a threat to future existence. Extensive environmentaldegradation and persistent global inequalities of wealth demand a new reformulation of the economic problem. Sustainable development has emerged as the most recent economic strategy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49.  13
    Giuseppe Munda (1997). Environmental Economics, Ecological Economics, and the Concept of Sustainable Development. Environmental Values 6 (2):213 - 233.
    This paper presents a systematic discussion, mainly for non-economists, on economic approaches to the concept of sustainable development. As a first step, the concept of sustainability is extensively discussed. As a second step, the argument that it is not possible to consider sustainability only from an economic or ecological point of view is defended; issues such as economic-ecological integration, inter-generational and intra-generational equity are considered of fundamental importance. Two different economic approaches to environmental issues, i.e. neo-classical environmental economics (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  50.  21
    Lesław Michnowski (2010). Global Governance and Information for the World Society's Sustainable Development. Dialogue and Universalism 20 (11-12):127-139.
    The current crisis is an open phase of a global crisis. It is a result of a false recognition of this structural crisis, previously described in the Limits to Growth Report. This crisis is not a result of overpopulation, but of the world society's maladjustment to life in a State of Change and Risk. In this rather new situation, obsolescence (moral destruction) of life-forms not adapted to new life-conditions is the main life-destroying and crisis-generating factor.To permanently overcome this crisis, we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000