Search results for 'Suzanne Pinac Ward' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  13
    Suzanne Pinac Ward, Dan R. Ward & Alan B. Deck (1993). Certified Public Accountants: Ethical Perception Skills and Attitudes on Ethics Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (8):601 - 610.
    This study investigated the proficiency of CPAs in recognizing and evaluating ethical and unethical situations. In addition, CPAs provided attitudes on ethics education. Respondents were asked to evaluate the ethical acceptability of CPA behavior as presented in six vignettes involving a variety of ethical dilemmas from questions of conflict of interest to questions of personal honor. The results tend to signify that CPAs can, to a degree, distinguish ethical and unethical behaviors. It appears that ethical behaviors and very specific unethical (...)
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  2. Barbara Abbott, Andrew Kehler & Gregory Ward, A Note on Kehler & Ward (2006).
    expression that indicates hearer-familiarity conversationally implicates that the referent is in fact nonfamiliar to the hearer” (KW 177, emphasis in original, footnote added). The purpose of this note is two-fold: first, to look more closely at the proposed implicature; and second, to clarify its relation to a different implicature – a scalar implicature of nonuniqueness resulting from use of the indefinite rather than the definite article, which was proposed by Hawkins (1991). In the first section below we distinguish explicit from (...)
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  3.  12
    M. Fox & D. Ward (1992). Endnotes for Fox/Ward, From Page 6. Inquiry 10 (4):11-11.
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  4.  8
    James Ward (1926). A List of the Writings of James Ward. The Monist 36 (1):170 - 176.
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  5.  10
    Maisie Ward (2004). Chesterton and Wilfrid Ward. The Chesterton Review 30 (3/4):421-431.
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  6.  8
    Mary Ward (1926). James Ward on Sense and Thought. Mind 35 (140):452-461.
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  7.  5
    Mary Ward (1926). Discussions: James Ward on Sense and Thought. Mind 35 (140):452-461.
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  8.  4
    Kelly Ward (1997). Book Review: Discipline-Based Approaches to Teaching Ethics: A Book Review by Kelly Ward. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (1):63 – 64.
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  9. Jacques Maritain, Joseph William Evans & Leo R. Ward (1968). Challenges and Renewals Selected Readings. Edited by Joseph W. Evans and Leo R. Ward. The World Pub. Co.
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  10. C. J. Mews, Cary J. Nederman, Rodney M. Thomson & John O. Ward (2003). Rhetoric and Renewal in the Latin West 1100-1540 Essays in Honour of John O. Ward.
     
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  11. Henry Sidgwick & James Ward (1902). Philosophy: Its Scope and Relations, an Intr. Course of Lects. [Ed. By J. Ward].
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  12. J. S. K. Ward (1968). Existence, Transcendence and God: J. S. K. WARD. Religious Studies 3 (2):461-476.
    Is the existence of God a question of fact? To the majority of theists, both now and in the past, I think it has seemed clear that, if the phrase ‘God exists’ is to be meaningful, then it is a fact, either that God exists or that he does not. This assertion may even seem trivially true; and yet it has evidently been denied, in recent years, by many theologians. The reasons for such a denial are, in part, to be (...)
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  13. James Ward (1920). The Realm of Ends or, Pluralism and Theism; the Gifford Lectures Delivered in the University of St. Andrews in the Years 1907-10, by James Ward. [REVIEW] The University Press.
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  14. Keith Ward (1998). Religion and Human Nature. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Continuing Keith Ward's series on comparative religion, this book deals with religious views of human nature and destiny. The beliefs of six major traditions are presented: the view of Advaita Vedanta that there is one Supreme Self, unfolding into the illusion of individual existence; the Vaishnava belief that there is an infinite number of souls, whose destiny is to be released from material embodiment; the Buddhist view that there is no eternal Self; the Abrahamic belief that persons are essentially (...)
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  15. Stephen J. A. Ward (2010). Global Journalism Ethics. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Stephen Ward argues that present media practices are narrowly based within the borders of single country and thus unable to successfully inform the public about a globalized world. Presenting an ethical framework for work in multimedia, the author extends John Rawl's theories of justice and the human good to redefine the aims for which journalism should strive and then applies this new foundation to issues such as the roles of patriotism and objectivity in journalism. An innovative argument that presents (...)
     
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  16.  27
    Stephen J. A. Ward (2010). Summary of “Toward a Global Media Ethics: Theoretical Perspectives”. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (1):65 – 68.
    This is a summary of “Toward a Global Media Ethics: Theoretical Perspectives,” which appeared in Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies , 29(2), 2008, 135-172. The article was written by Clifford G. Christians, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Shakuntala Rao, State University of New York-Plattsburgh; Stephen J. A. Ward, University of Wisconsin-Madison; and Herman Wasserman, University of Sheffield. It was the result of a workshop on global media ethics by the article's authors hosted by the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study (...)
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  17. Julie K. Ward (2008). Aristotle on Homonymy: Dialectic and Science. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Julie K. Ward examines Aristotle's thought regarding how language informs our views of what is real. First she places Aristotle's theory in its historical and philosophical contexts in relation to Plato and Speusippus. Ward then explores Aristotle's theory of language as it is deployed in several works, including Ethics, Topics, Physics, and Metaphysics, so as to consider its relation to dialectical practice and scientific explanation as Aristotle conceived it.
     
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  18.  12
    Roger A. Ward (2004). Conversion in American Philosophy: Exploring the Practice of Transformation. Fordham University Press.
    In this fresh, provocative account of the American philosophical tradition, Roger Ward explores the work of key thinkers through an innovative and counterintuitive lens: religious conversion. From Jonathan Edwards to Cornel West, Ward threads the history of American thought into an extended, multivalent encounter with the religious experience. Looking at Dewey, James, Peirce, Rorty, Corrington, and other thinkers, Ward demonstrates that religious themes have deeply influenced the development of American philosophy.This innovative reading of the American philosophical tradition (...)
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  19.  1
    Geoffrey Ward (1986). Dying to Write: Maurice Blanchot and Tennyson's "Tithonus". Critical Inquiry 12 (4):672-687.
    The customary assumption about dying is that one would rather not. The event of death itself should be postponed for as long as possible, and comfort may be gained from doctrines which promise a victory over it. We celebrate those who try to cheat it. The dying Henry James thought he was Napoleon, and there is something in that, over and above the pathos of a wandering mind, that exemplifies, however parodically, the mental set we expect to find and what (...)
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  20. Claire Pajaczkowska & Ivan Ward (eds.) (2008). Shame and Sexuality: Psychoanalysis and Visual Culture. Routledge.
    Why do human beings feel shame? What is the cultural dimension of shame and sexuality? Can theory understand the power of affect? How is psychoanalysis integral to cultural theory? The experience of shame is a profound, painful and universal emotion with lasting effects on many aspects of public life and human culture. Rooted in childhood experience, linked to sexuality and the cultural norms which regulate the body and its pleasures, shame is uniquely human. _Shame and Sexuality _explores elements of shame (...)
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  21. Stephen J. A. Ward (2012). Ethics and the Media: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a comprehensive introduction to media ethics and an exploration of how it must change to adapt to today's media revolution. Using an ethical framework for the new 'mixed media' ethics – taking in the global, interactive media produced by both citizens and professionals – Stephen J. A. Ward discusses the ethical issues which occur in both mainstream and non-mainstream media, from newspapers and broadcast to social media users and bloggers. He re-defines traditional conceptions of journalistic truth-seeking, (...)
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  22. Stephen J. A. Ward (2011). Ethics and the Media: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a comprehensive introduction to media ethics and an exploration of how it must change to adapt to today's media revolution. Using an ethical framework for the new 'mixed media' ethics – taking in the global, interactive media produced by both citizens and professionals – Stephen J. A. Ward discusses the ethical issues which occur in both mainstream and non-mainstream media, from newspapers and broadcast to social media users and bloggers. He re-defines traditional conceptions of journalistic truth-seeking, (...)
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  23. Graham Ward (2016). How the Light Gets In: Ethical Life I. Oxford University Press Uk.
    How the Light Gets In: Ethical Life I presents a systematic account of the teachings of the Christian faith to offer a vision, from a human, created, and limited perspective, of the ways all things might be understood from the divine perspective. It explores how Christian doctrine is lived, and the way in which beliefs are not simply cognitive sets of ideas but embodied cultural practices. Christians learn how to understand the contents of their faith, learn the language of the (...)
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  24.  6
    Patricia A. Ward (1980). Joseph Joubert and the Critical Tradition: Platonism and Romanticism. Droz.
    WARD Joseph Joubert and the Critical Tradition Platonism and Romanticism LIBRAIRIE DROZ SA 11, rue Massot GENEVE 1980 ...
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  25.  11
    Andrew Ward (2006). Kant: The Three Critiques. Polity Press.
    Immanuel Kants three critiques the Critique of Pure Reason, the Critique of Practical Reason and the Critique of Judgment are among the pinnacles of Western Philosophy. This accessible study grounds Kants philosophical position in the context of his intellectual influences, most notably against the background of the scepticism and empiricism of David Hume. It is an ideal critical introduction to Kants views in the key areas of knowledge and metaphysics; morality and freedom; and beauty and design. By examining the Kantian (...)
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  26. Andrew Ward (2006). Kant: The Three Critiques. Polity.
    Immanuel Kants three critiques the Critique of Pure Reason, the Critique of Practical Reason and the Critique of Judgment are among the pinnacles of Western Philosophy. This accessible study grounds Kants philosophical position in the context of his intellectual influences, most notably against the background of the scepticism and empiricism of David Hume. It is an ideal critical introduction to Kants views in the key areas of knowledge and metaphysics; morality and freedom; and beauty and design. By examining the Kantian (...)
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  27. Andrew Ward (2006). Kant: The Three Critiques. Polity.
    Immanuel Kants three critiques the Critique of Pure Reason, the Critique of Practical Reason and the Critique of Judgment are among the pinnacles of Western Philosophy. This accessible study grounds Kants philosophical position in the context of his intellectual influences, most notably against the background of the scepticism and empiricism of David Hume. It is an ideal critical introduction to Kants views in the key areas of knowledge and metaphysics; morality and freedom; and beauty and design. By examining the Kantian (...)
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  28.  1
    Ian Ward (2009). Law, Text, Terror. Cambridge University Press.
    Ian Ward argues that through a closer appreciation of the ethical and aesthetical dimensions of terror, as well as the historical, political and cultural, we can better comprehend modern expressions and experiences of terrorism.
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  29. James Ward (2011). Naturalism and Agnosticism: The Gifford Lectures Delivered Before the University of Aberdeen in the Years 1896–1898. Cambridge University Press.
    James Ward was Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic at the University of Cambridge. First published in 1899, this two-volume work consists of his Gifford Lectures, delivered between 1896 and 1898, in which he criticises Naturalism, and Agnosticism, in favour of Idealism, in which spiritual and non-material phenomena are central to human experience. The lectures in Volume 1 set Naturalism and Agnosticism within the context of the Mechanical Theory, arguing against its claim that experience can be fully described in (...)
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  30. James Ward (2011). Naturalism and Agnosticism 2 Volume Paperback Set: The Gifford Lectures Delivered Before the University of Aberdeen in the Years 1896–1898. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    James Ward was Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic at the University of Cambridge. First published in 1899, this two-volume work consists of his Gifford Lectures, delivered between 1896 and 1898, in which he criticises Naturalism, and Agnosticism, in favour of Idealism, in which spiritual and non-material phenomena are central to human experience. Volume 1 sets Naturalism and Agnosticism within the context of the Mechanical Theory, arguing against its claim that experience can be fully described in terms of mechanical (...)
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  31. James Ward (2012). Naturalism and Agnosticism: Volume 1: The Gifford Lectures Delivered Before the University of Aberdeen in the Years 1896–1898. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    James Ward was Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic at the University of Cambridge. First published in 1899, this two-volume work consists of his Gifford Lectures, delivered between 1896 and 1898, in which he criticises Naturalism, and Agnosticism, in favour of Idealism, in which spiritual and non-material phenomena are central to human experience. The lectures in Volume 1 set Naturalism and Agnosticism within the context of the Mechanical Theory, arguing against its claim that experience can be fully described in (...)
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  32. James Ward (2012). Naturalism and Agnosticism: Volume 2: The Gifford Lectures Delivered Before the University of Aberdeen in the Years 1896–1898. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    James Ward was Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic at the University of Cambridge. First published in 1899, this two-volume work consists of his Gifford Lectures, delivered between 1896 and 1898, in which he criticises Naturalism, and Agnosticism, in favour of Idealism, in which spiritual and non-material phenomena are central to human experience. The lectures in Volume 2 oppose dualist defences of the Mechanical Theory, which claim that the mind is distinct from physical objects. Ward ultimately argues for (...)
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  33. Michael Ward (2010). Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis. OUP Usa.
    For over half a century, scholars have laboured to show that C. S. Lewis's famed but apparently disorganised Chronicles of Narnia have an underlying symbolic coherence, pointing to such possible unifying themes as the seven sacraments, the seven deadly sins, and the seven books of Spenser's Faerie Queene. None of these explanations has won general acceptance and the structure of Narnia's symbolism has remained a mystery. -/- Michael Ward has finally solved the enigma. In Planet Narnia he demonstrates that (...)
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  34. Michael Ward (2007). Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis. Oxford University Press Usa.
    For over half a century, scholars have laboured to show that C. S. Lewis's famed but apparently disorganised Chronicles of Narnia have an underlying symbolic coherence, pointing to such possible unifying themes as the seven sacraments, the seven deadly sins, and the seven books of Spenser's Faerie Queene. None of these explanations has won general acceptance and the structure of Narnia's symbolism has remained a mystery. Michael Ward has finally solved the enigma. In Planet Narnia he demonstrates that medieval (...)
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  35. Keith Ward (1998). Religion and Human Nature. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Continuing Keith Ward's series on comparative religion, this book deals with religious views of human nature and destiny. The beliefs of six major traditions are presented: the view of Advaita Vedanta that there is one Supreme Self, unfolding into the illusion of individual existence; the Vaishnava belief that there is an infinite number of souls, whose destiny is to be released from material embodiment; the Buddhist view that there is no eternal Self; the Abrahamic belief that persons are essentially (...)
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  36. Stephen J. A. Ward (2015). The Invention of Journalism Ethics, Second Edition: The Path to Objectivity and Beyond. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Does objectivity exist in the news media? In The Invention of Journalism Ethics, Stephen Ward argues that given the current emphasis on interpretation, analysis, and perspective, journalists and the public need a new theory of objectivity. He explores the varied ethical assertions of journalists over the past few centuries, focusing on the changing relationship between journalist and audience. This historical analysis leads to an innovative theory of pragmatic objectivity that enables journalists and the public to recognize and avoid biased (...)
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  37. Stephen J. A. Ward (2015). The Invention of Journalism Ethics, Second Edition: The Path to Objectivity and Beyond. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Does objectivity exist in the news media? In The Invention of Journalism Ethics, Stephen Ward argues that given the current emphasis on interpretation, analysis, and perspective, journalists and the public need a new theory of objectivity. He explores the varied ethical assertions of journalists over the past few centuries, focusing on the changing relationship between journalist and audience. This historical analysis leads to an innovative theory of pragmatic objectivity that enables journalists and the public to recognize and avoid biased (...)
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  38. Lee Ward (ed.) (2016). Two Treatises of Government. Focus.
    Designed to serve the needs of students confronting Locke's political thought for the first time, Lee Ward's edition offers a faithful text of _Two Treatises of Government _with modernized spelling and punctuation. Its Editor's Introduction outlines the main arguments of these works, illustrates the conceptual thread uniting the less frequently read _First Treatise_ with the far more famous _Second Treatise_, and locates Locke's work amid the turbulent constitutional battles of 1690s England. Helpful notes at the foot of the page, (...)
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  39. Leo L. Ward (ed.) (1948). The Uses of Knowledge: Selections From the Idea of a University. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This insightful selection, features four discourses from The Idea of a University: Knowledge Its Own End; Knowledge Viewed in Relation to Learning; Knowledge Viewed in Relation to Professional Skill; and Knowledge Viewed in Relation to Religion. Also included are excerpts from the "Preface" and the following appendices: Discipline of Mind; Literature and Science; and Style. Edited by Leo L. Ward, this volume also contains an introduction, a list of principal dates in Newman's life, and a bibliography.
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  40.  1
    Suzanne F. Wemple (1990). Benedicta Ward, SLG, Harlots of the Desert: A Study of Repentance in Early Monastic Sources.(Cistercian Studies Series, 106.) Kalamazoo, Mich.: Cistercian Publications, 1987. Pp. Ix, 113. $25.95 (Cloth); $11.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 65 (3):777-778.
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  41. J. Simner, C. Mulvenna, N. Sagiv, E. Tsakanikos, S. A. Witherby, C. Fraser, K. Scott & J. Ward (2006). Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences. Perception 35 (8):1024-33.
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  42. James Ward (1919). Sense-Knowledge. Mind 28 (111):257-274.
  43. Noam Sagiv, Julia Simner, James Collins, Brian Butterworth & Jamie Ward (2006). What is the Relationship Between Synaesthesia and Visuo-Spatial Number Forms? Cognition 101 (1):114-28.
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  44. James Ward (1894). Assimilation and Association. Mind 3 (12):509-532.
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  45. Dave Ward, Tom Roberts & Andy Clark (2011). Knowing What We Can Do: Actions, Intentions, and the Construction of Phenomenal Experience. Synthese 181 (3):375-394.
    How do questions concerning consciousness and phenomenal experience relate to, or interface with, questions concerning plans, knowledge and intentions? At least in the case of visual experience the relation, we shall argue, is tight. Visual perceptual experience, we shall argue, is fixed by an agent’s direct unmediated knowledge concerning her poise (or apparent poise) over a currently enabled action space. An action space, in this specific sense, is to be understood not as a fine-grained matrix of possibilities for bodily movement, (...)
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  46.  40
    John Milbank, Catherine Pickstock & Graham Ward (eds.) (1999). Radical Orthodoxy: A New Theology. Routledge.
    Radical Orthodoxy is a new wave of theological thinking that seeks to re-inject the modern world with theology. The group of theologians associated with Radical Orthodoxy are dissatisfied with conteporary theolgical responses to both modernity and postmodernity Radical Orthodoxy is a collection that aims to reclaim the world by situating its concerns and activities within a theological framework. By mapping the new theology against a range of areas where modernity has failed, these essays offer us way out of the impasses (...)
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  47.  8
    Richard D. Wright & Lawrence M. Ward (2008). Orienting of Attention. Oxford University Press.
    This book is a succinct introduction to the orienting of attention.
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  48.  23
    Stephen J. A. Ward (2005). Philosophical Foundations for Global Journalism Ethics. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 20 (1):3 – 21.
    This article proposes 3 principles and 3 imperatives as the philosophical foundations of a global journalism ethics. The central claim is that the globalization of news media requires a radical rethinking of the principles and standards of journalism ethics, through the adoption of a cosmopolitan attitude. The article explains how and why ethicists should construct a global journalism ethics, using a contractualist approach. It then formulates 3 "claims" or principles: the claims of credibility, justifiable consequence, and humanity. The claim of (...)
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  49.  45
    Jamie Ward & Peter Meijer (2010). Visual Experiences in the Blind Induced by an Auditory Sensory Substitution Device. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):492-500.
    In this report, the phenomenology of two blind users of a sensory substitution device – “The vOICe” – that converts visual images to auditory signals is described. The users both report detailed visual phenomenology that developed within months of immersive use and has continued to evolve over a period of years. This visual phenomenology, although triggered through use of The vOICe, is likely to depend not only on online visualization of the auditory signal but also on the users’ previous (albeit (...)
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  50. G. Ward (1996). Book Reviews : Barth's Ethics of Reconciliation, by John Webster, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995. Xii+238pp. Hb. 35. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 9 (2):126-129.
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