Search results for 'Suzanne Pinac Ward' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Suzanne Pinac Ward, Dan R. Ward & Alan B. Deck (1993). Certified Public Accountants: Ethical Perception Skills and Attitudes on Ethics Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (8):601 - 610.score: 900.0
    This study investigated the proficiency of CPAs in recognizing and evaluating ethical and unethical situations. In addition, CPAs provided attitudes on ethics education. Respondents were asked to evaluate the ethical acceptability of CPA behavior as presented in six vignettes involving a variety of ethical dilemmas from questions of conflict of interest to questions of personal honor. The results tend to signify that CPAs can, to a degree, distinguish ethical and unethical behaviors. It appears that ethical behaviors and very specific unethical (...)
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  2. Barbara Abbott, Andrew Kehler & Gregory Ward, A Note on Kehler & Ward (2006).score: 150.0
    expression that indicates hearer-familiarity conversationally implicates that the referent is in fact nonfamiliar to the hearer” (KW 177, emphasis in original, footnote added). The purpose of this note is two-fold: first, to look more closely at the proposed implicature; and second, to clarify its relation to a different implicature – a scalar implicature of nonuniqueness resulting from use of the indefinite rather than the definite article, which was proposed by Hawkins (1991). In the first section below we distinguish explicit from (...)
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  3. Mary Ward (1926). James Ward on Sense and Thought. Mind 35 (140):452-461.score: 120.0
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  4. Kelly Ward (1997). Book Review: Discipline-Based Approaches to Teaching Ethics: A Book Review by Kelly Ward. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (1):63 – 64.score: 120.0
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  5. Maisie Ward (2004). Chesterton and Wilfrid Ward. The Chesterton Review 30 (3/4):421-431.score: 120.0
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  6. Mary Ward (1926). Discussions: James Ward on Sense and Thought. Mind 35 (140):452-461.score: 120.0
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  7. M. Fox & D. Ward (1992). Endnotes for Fox/Ward, From Page 6. Inquiry 10 (4):11-11.score: 120.0
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  8. James Ward (1926). A List of the Writings of James Ward. The Monist 36 (1):170 - 176.score: 120.0
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  9. Stephen J. A. Ward (2010). Summary of “Toward a Global Media Ethics: Theoretical Perspectives”. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (1):65 – 68.score: 60.0
    This is a summary of “Toward a Global Media Ethics: Theoretical Perspectives,” which appeared in Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies , 29(2), 2008, 135-172. The article was written by Clifford G. Christians, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Shakuntala Rao, State University of New York-Plattsburgh; Stephen J. A. Ward, University of Wisconsin-Madison; and Herman Wasserman, University of Sheffield. It was the result of a workshop on global media ethics by the article's authors hosted by the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study (...)
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  10. Roger A. Ward (2004). Conversion in American Philosophy: Exploring the Practice of Transformation. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    In this fresh, provocative account of the American philosophical tradition, Roger Ward explores the work of key thinkers through an innovative and counterintuitive lens: religious conversion. From Jonathan Edwards to Cornel West, Ward threads the history of American thought into an extended, multivalent encounter with the religious experience. Looking at Dewey, James, Peirce, Rorty, Corrington, and other thinkers, Ward demonstrates that religious themes have deeply influenced the development of American philosophy.This innovative reading of the American philosophical tradition (...)
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  11. Andrew Ward (2006). Kant: The Three Critiques. Polity Press.score: 60.0
    Immanuel Kants three critiques the Critique of Pure Reason, the Critique of Practical Reason and the Critique of Judgment are among the pinnacles of Western Philosophy. This accessible study grounds Kants philosophical position in the context of his intellectual influences, most notably against the background of the scepticism and empiricism of David Hume. It is an ideal critical introduction to Kants views in the key areas of knowledge and metaphysics; morality and freedom; and beauty and design. By examining the Kantian (...)
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  12. Patricia A. Ward (1980). Joseph Joubert and the Critical Tradition: Platonism and Romanticism. Droz.score: 60.0
    WARD Joseph Joubert and the Critical Tradition Platonism and Romanticism LIBRAIRIE DROZ SA 11, rue Massot GENEVE 1980 ...
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  13. Ian Ward (2009). Law, Text, Terror. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Ian Ward argues that through a closer appreciation of the ethical and aesthetical dimensions of terror, as well as the historical, political and cultural, we can better comprehend modern expressions and experiences of terrorism.
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  14. Julie K. Ward (2008). Aristotle on Homonymy: Dialectic and Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this book, Julie K. Ward examines Aristotle's thought regarding how language informs our views of what is real. First she places Aristotle's theory in its historical and philosophical contexts in relation to Plato and Speusippus. Ward then explores Aristotle's theory of language as it is deployed in several works, including Ethics, Topics, Physics, and Metaphysics, so as to consider its relation to dialectical practice and scientific explanation as Aristotle conceived it.
     
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  15. Michael Ward (2010). Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    For over half a century, scholars have laboured to show that C. S. Lewis's famed but apparently disorganised Chronicles of Narnia have an underlying symbolic coherence, pointing to such possible unifying themes as the seven sacraments, the seven deadly sins, and the seven books of Spenser's Faerie Queene. None of these explanations has won general acceptance and the structure of Narnia's symbolism has remained a mystery. -/- Michael Ward has finally solved the enigma. In Planet Narnia he demonstrates that (...)
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  16. Barry Ward (2007). Laws, Explanation, Governing, and Generation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):537 – 552.score: 30.0
    Advocates and opponents of Humean Supervenience (HS) have neglected a crucial feature of nomic explanation: laws can explain by generating descriptions of possibilities. Dretske and Armstrong have opposed HS by arguing that laws construed as Humean regularities cannot explain, but their arguments fail precisely because they neglect to consider this generating role of laws. Humeans have dismissed the intuitive violations of HS manifested by John Carroll's Mirror Worlds as erroneous, but distinguishing the laws' generating role from the non-Humean notion that (...)
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  17. Barry Ward (2009). Cartwright, Forces, and Ceteris Paribus Laws. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):55-62.score: 30.0
    This paper proposes a novel response to Nancy Cartwright’s famous argument that fundamental physical laws, such as Newton’s law of gravitation, are ceteris paribus: construing forces instrumentally allows such laws to apply generally, eliminating the need for ceteris paribus clauses. The instrumental construal of forces is motivated, and defended against prominent recent objections. Further, it is argued that such instrumentalism in no way undermines the role of force-laws in scientific practise, and indeed, is compatible with a robust realism about force-laws.
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  18. Dave Ward, Tom Roberts & Andy Clark (2011). Knowing What We Can Do: Actions, Intentions, and the Construction of Phenomenal Experience. Synthese 181 (3):375-394.score: 30.0
    How do questions concerning consciousness and phenomenal experience relate to, or interface with, questions concerning plans, knowledge and intentions? At least in the case of visual experience the relation, we shall argue, is tight. Visual perceptual experience, we shall argue, is fixed by an agent’s direct unmediated knowledge concerning her poise (or apparent poise) over a currently enabled action space. An action space, in this specific sense, is to be understood not as a fine-grained matrix of possibilities for bodily movement, (...)
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  19. Barry Ward (2003). Sometimes the World is Not Enough: The Pursuit of Explanatory Laws in a Humean World. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (2):175–197.score: 30.0
    A novel motivation for a Humean projectivist construal of our concept of scientific law is provided. The analysis is partially developed and used to explain intuitions that are problematic for a Humean reductionist construal of lawhood. A possible non-Humean rejoinder is discussed and rejected. In an appendix, further intuitions that are problematic for Humean reductionists are explained projectively.
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  20. Barry Ward (2007). The Natural Kind Analysis of Ceteris Paribus Law Statements. Philosophical Topics 35 (1/2):359-380.score: 30.0
    A novel analysis of Ceteris Paribus (CP) law statements is constructed. It explains how such statements can have determinate, testable content by relating their semantics to the semantics of natural kind terms. Objections are discussed, and the analysis is compared with others. Many philosophers think of the CP clause as a ‘no interference’ clause. However, many non-strict scientific generalizations are clearly not subsumed under this construal. While this analysis accounts interference cases as violating the CP clause, it is applicable to (...)
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  21. Noam Sagiv & Jamie Ward (2006). Cross-Modal Interactions: Lessons From Synesthesia. In Susana Martinez-Conde, S. L. Macknik, L. M. Martinez, J-M Alonso & P. U. Tse (eds.), Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier Science. 155--259.score: 30.0
    Synesthesia is a condition in which stimulation in one modality also gives rise to a perceptual experience in a second modality. In two recent studies we found that the condition is more common than previously reported; up to 5% of the population may experience at least one type of synesthesia. Although the condition has been traditionally viewed as an anomaly (e.g., breakdown in modularity), it seems that at least some of the mechanisms underlying synesthesia do reflect universal cross-modal mechanisms. We (...)
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  22. Barry Ward (2004). Dretske and Armstrong on Regularity Analyses and Explanation. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (1):193-200.score: 30.0
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  23. Dave Ward (2012). Why Don't Synaesthetic Colours Adapt Away? Philosophical Studies 159 (1):123-138.score: 30.0
    Synaesthetes persistently perceive certain stimuli as systematically accompanied by illusory colours, even though they know those colours to be illusory. This appears to contrast with cases where a subject’s colour vision adapts to systematic distortions caused by wearing coloured goggles. Given that each case involves longstanding systematic distortion of colour perception that the subjects recognize as such, how can a theory of colour perception explain the fact that perceptual adaptation occurs in one case but not the other? I argue that (...)
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  24. Andrew Ward (2001). Kant's First Analogy of Experience. Kant-Studien 92 (4):387-406.score: 30.0
  25. Keith Ward (2000). Divine Action in the World of Physics: Response to Nicholas Saunders. Zygon 35 (4):901-906.score: 30.0
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  26. K. Ward (1967). The Unity of Space and Time. Philosophy 42 (159):68 - 74.score: 30.0
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  27. J. Simner, C. Mulvenna, N. Sagiv, E. Tsakanikos, S. A. Witherby, C. Fraser, K. Scott & J. Ward (2006). Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences. Perception 35 (8):1024-33.score: 30.0
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  28. Ian Ward (2004). Introduction to Critical Legal Theory. Cavendish Pub..score: 30.0
    Introduction to Critical Legal Theory provides an accessible introduction to the study of law and legal theory. It covers all the seminal movements in classical, modern and postmodern legal thought, engaging the reader with the ideas of jurists as diverse as Aristotle, Hobbes and Kant, Marx, Foucault and Dworkin. At the same time, it impresses the interdisciplinary nature of critical legal thought, introducing the reader to the philosophy, the economics and the politics of law. This new edition focuses even more (...)
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  29. Keith Ward (2006/2007). Is Religion Dangerous? William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 30.0
    The causes of violence -- The corruptibility of all things human -- Religion and war -- Faith and reason -- Life after death -- Morality and the Bible -- Morality and faith -- The enlightenment, liberal thought and religion -- Does religion do more harm than good in personal life? -- What good has religion done?
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  30. Andrew Ward (2005). Defending Ethical Naturalism: The Roles of Cognitive Science and Pragmatism. Zygon 40 (1):201-220.score: 30.0
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  31. Sam M. Doesburg, Keiichi Kitajo & Lawrence M. Ward (2005). Increased Gamma-Band Synchrony Precedes Switching of Conscious Perceptual Objects in Binocular Rivalry. Neuroreport 16 (11):1139-1142.score: 30.0
  32. Thomas M. Ward (2011). Relations Without Forms: Some Consequences of Aquinass Metaphysics of Relations. Vivarium 48 (3-4):279-301.score: 30.0
    This article presents a new interpretation and critique of some aspects of Aquinas's metaphysics of relations, with special reference to a theological problem—the relation of God to creatures—that catalyzed Aquinas's and much medieval thought on the ontology of relations. I will show that Aquinas's ontologically reductive theory of categorical real relations should equip him to identify certain relations as real relations, which he actually identifies as relations of reason, most notably the relation of God to creatures.
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  33. Lester F. Ward (1884). Mind as a Social Factor. Mind 9 (36):563-573.score: 30.0
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  34. John Milbank, Catherine Pickstock & Graham Ward (eds.) (1999). Radical Orthodoxy: A New Theology. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Radical Orthodoxy is a new wave of theological thinking that seeks to re-inject the modern world with theology. The group of theologians associated with Radical Orthodoxy are dissatisfied with conteporary theolgical responses to both modernity and postmodernity Radical Orthodoxy is a collection that aims to reclaim the world by situating its concerns and activities within a theological framework. By mapping the new theology against a range of areas where modernity has failed, these essays offer us way out of the impasses (...)
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  35. Julie Ward (2009). Aristotelian homonymy. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):575-585.score: 30.0
    The notion of homonymy has been of perennial philosophical interest to scholars of Aristotle from ancient Greek commentators to modern thinkers. Across historical periods, certain issues have remained central, such as the nature of Aristotelian homonymy, its relation to synonymy and analogy, and whether the concept undergoes change throughout the corpus. In addition, fundamental questions concerning the use of homonymy in regard to dialectical practice and scientific inquiry are raised and discussed. It is argued that there are two aspects to (...)
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  36. Katrien Devolder & Christopher M. Ward (2007). Rescuing Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: The Possibility of Embryo Reconstitution After Stem Cell Derivation. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):245–263.score: 30.0
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  37. Thomas M. Ward (2011). Spinoza on the Essences of Modes. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):19-46.score: 30.0
    This paper examines some aspects of Spinoza's metaphysics of the essences of modes.2 I situate Spinoza's use of the notion of essence as a response to traditional, Aristotelian, ways of thinking about essence. I argue that, although Spinoza rejects part of the Aristotelian conception of essence, according to which it is in virtue of its essence that a thing is a member of a kind, he nevertheless retains a different part of such a conception, according to which an essence is (...)
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  38. Stephen J. A. Ward & Herman Wasserman (2011). Towards an Open Ethics: Implications of New Media Platforms for Global Ethics Discourse. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (4):275-292.score: 30.0
    This article provides an international perspective on how new media technologies are shifting the parameters of debates about journalism ethics. It argues that new, mixed media help create an ?open media ethics? and offers an exploration of how these developments encourage a transition from a closed professional ethics to an ethics that is the concern of all citizens. The relation between an open media ethics and the idea of a global fifth estate, facilitated by global online media, is explored. The (...)
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  39. Barry Ward (2002). Humeanism Without Humean Supervenience: A Projectivist Account of Laws and Possibilities. Philosophical Studies 107 (3):191-208.score: 30.0
    Acceptance of Humean Supervenience and thereductive Humean analyses that entail it leadsto a litany of inadequately explained conflictswith our intuitions regarding laws andpossibilities. However, the non-reductiveHumeanism developed here, on which law claimsare understood as normative rather than factstating, can accommodate those intuitions. Rational constraints on such norms provide aset of consistency relations that ground asemantics formulated in terms offactual-normative worlds, solving theFrege-Geach problem of construing unassertedcontexts. This set of factual-normative worldsincludes exactly the intuitive sets ofnomologically possible worlds associated witheach possible (...)
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  40. Leo R. Ward (2003). Synchronous Neural Oscillations and Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7:553-559.score: 30.0
  41. Andrew Ward (1988). Davidson on Attributions of Beliefs to Animals. Philosophia 18 (1):97-106.score: 30.0
  42. Barry Ward (2005). Projecting Chances: A Humean Vindication and Justification of the Principal Principle. Philosophy of Science 72 (1):241-261.score: 30.0
    Faced with the paradox of undermining futures, Humeans have resigned themselves to accounts of chance that severely conflict with our intuitions. However, such resignation is premature: The problem is Humean supervenience (HS), not Humeanism. This paper develops a projectivist Humeanism on which chance claims are understood as normative, rather than fact stating. Rationality constraints on the cotenability of norms and factual claims ground a factual-normative worlds semantics that, in addition to solving the Frege-Geach problem, delivers the intuitive set of possibilia (...)
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  43. Keith Ward (2002). Believing in Miracles. Zygon 37 (3):741-750.score: 30.0
    David Hume’s arguments against believing reports of miracles are shown to be very weak. Laws of nature, I suggest, are best seen not as exceptionless rules but as context-dependent realizations of natural powers. In that context miracles transcend the natural order not as "violations" but as intelligible realizations of a divine supernatural purpose. Miracles are not parts of scientific theory but can be parts of a web of rational belief fully consistent with science. (edited).
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  44. James B. Murphy, Stephen J. A. Ward & Aine Donovan (2006). Ethical Ideals in Journalism: Civic Uplift or Telling the Truth? Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (4):322 – 337.score: 30.0
    In this article, we explore the tension between truth telling and the demands of civic life, with an emphasis on the tension between serving one's country and reporting the truth as completely and independently as possible. We argue that the principle of truth telling in journalism takes priority over the promotion of civic values, including a narrow patriotism. Even in times of war, responsible journalism must not allow a narrow patriotism to undermine its commitment to truth telling. Journalists best fulfill (...)
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  45. Sam M. Doesburg & Lawrence M. Ward (2007). Corticothalamic Necessity, Qualia, and Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):90-91.score: 30.0
    The centrencephalic theory of consciousness cannot yet account for some evidence from both brain damaged and normally functioning humans that strongly implicates thalamocortical activity as essential for consciousness. Moreover, the behavioral indexes used by Merker to implicate consciousness need more development, as, besides being somewhat vague, they lead to some apparent contradictions in the attribution of consciousness. (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  46. Lee Ward (2009). The Relation Between Politics and Philosophy in Plato's Apology of Socrates. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):501-519.score: 30.0
    In Plato’s Apology of Socrates, Socrates claims that any just person who becomes involved in politics will be destroyed by the “multitude” and that the philosopher must therefore lead a private life. I argue that Socrates’ elaboration of his relation to the political community, especially in the trial of the generals of Arginusae and the arrest of Leon, raises more questions than a cursory reading can answer both with respect to the logical structure of the argument in the Apology and (...)
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  47. Noam Sagiv, Julia Simner, James Collins, Brian Butterworth & Jamie Ward (2006). What is the Relationship Between Synaesthesia and Visuo-Spatial Number Forms? Cognition 101 (1):114-28.score: 30.0
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  48. Keith Ward (2001). The Temporality of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 50 (1/3):153-169.score: 30.0
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  49. David E. Ward (1995). Imaginary Scenarios, Black Boxes and Philosophical Method. Erkenntnis 43 (2):181 - 198.score: 30.0
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  50. Jamie Ward & Peter Meijer (2010). Visual Experiences in the Blind Induced by an Auditory Sensory Substitution Device. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):492-500.score: 30.0
    In this report, the phenomenology of two blind users of a sensory substitution device – “The vOICe” – that converts visual images to auditory signals is described. The users both report detailed visual phenomenology that developed within months of immersive use and has continued to evolve over a period of years. This visual phenomenology, although triggered through use of The vOICe, is likely to depend not only on online visualization of the auditory signal but also on the users’ previous (albeit (...)
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