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Suzanne Uniacke [26]Suzanne M. Uniacke [2]
  1. Suzanne Uniacke (2011). Proportionality and Self-Defense. Law and Philosophy 30 (3):253-272.
    Proportionality is widely accepted as a necessary condition of justified self-defense. What gives rise to this particular condition and what role it plays in the justification of self-defense seldom receive focused critical attention. In this paper I address the standard of proportionality applicable to personal self-defense and the role that proportionality plays in justifying the use of harmful force in self-defense. I argue against an equivalent harm view of proportionality in self-defense, and in favor of a standard of proportionality in (...)
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  2.  4
    Suzanne Uniacke (1996). [Book Review] Permissible Killing, the Self-Defence Justification of Homicide. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (3):641-644.
    Do individuals have a positive right of self-defence? And if so, what are the limits of this right? Under what conditions does this use of force extend to the defence of others? These are some of the issues explored by Dr Uniacke in this comprehensive 1994 philosophical discussion of the principles relevant to self-defence as a moral and legal justification of homicide. She establishes a unitary right of self-defence and the defence of others, one which grounds the permissibility of the (...)
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  3.  2
    Suzanne Uniacke (2016). Criminalising Unknowing Defence. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    Should a legal plea of self- or third-party defence include an ‘awareness component’ that requires that the actor was aware of the justificatory facts at the time of action? Some theorists argue that in cases of so-called unknowing defence, where an actor in fact averts an otherwise unavoidable danger to himself or another person although unaware at the time of action that this is what he is doing, the objective facts alone should allow a plea of self- or third-party defence. (...)
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  4.  36
    Suzanne Uniacke (2007). Emotional Excuses. Law and Philosophy 26 (1):95-117.
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  5.  62
    Suzanne Uniacke & H. J. Mccloskey (1992). Peter Singer and Non-Voluntary 'Euthanasia': Tripping Down the Slippery Slope. Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (2):203-219.
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  6.  54
    Suzanne Uniacke (2000). Why is Revenge Wrong? Journal of Value Inquiry 34 (1):61-69.
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  7.  46
    Suzanne M. Uniacke (2005). Responsibility and Obligation: Some Kantian Directions. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (4):461 – 475.
    This paper asks how we should conceptualize the relationship between responsibility and obligation. Its central concern is the relevance of considerations of obligation to the attribution of responsibility for what we do or bring about. The paper approaches this issue through an examination of Kant's complex, challenging and instructive theory of responsibility, in which strict obligation plays a pivotal role in attributions of responsibility for the outcomes of our actions. Even if we do not accept Kant's strongly juridical concept of (...)
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  8.  2
    Piers Benn & Suzanne Uniacke (1995). Permissible Killing. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (181):550.
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  9.  63
    Suzanne Uniacke (2002). A Critique of the Preference Utilitarian Objection to Killing People. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2):209 – 217.
    Preference utilitarianism is widely considered a significant advance on classical utilitarianism when it comes to explaining why it is wrong to kill people. This paper focuses attention on the nature of the preference utilitarian 'direct' objection to killing a person and on the related claim that a person's preferences are non-replaceable. I argue that the preference utilitarian case against killing people is overstated and overrated. My concluding remarks indicate the relevance of this discussion to deeper issues in normative moral theory.
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  10.  6
    Suzanne Uniacke (2004). 600 REFEREES Stephen J. Sullivan Sharon Sytsma Lauren Tillinghast. Journal of Value Inquiry 38:599-600.
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  11.  41
    Suzanne Uniacke (1987). In Vitro Fertilization and the Right to Reproduce. Bioethics 1 (3):241–254.
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  12.  14
    Suzanne Uniacke (2015). Punishment as Penalty. Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (1):37-47.
    The paper’s central focus is the ‘duty’ theory of punishment developed by Victor Tadros in The Ends of Harm. In evaluating the ‘duty’ theory we might ask two broad closely related questions: whether in its own terms the ‘duty’ theory provides a justification of the imposition of hard treatment or suffering on an offender; and whether the ‘duty’ theory can provide a justification of punishment. This paper is principally concerned with the second question, which stems from a significant difference between (...)
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  13. Suzanne Uniacke (1994). Permissible Killing: The Self-Defence Justification of Homicide. Cambridge University Press.
    Do individuals have a positive right of self-defence? And if so, what are the limits of this right? Under what conditions does this use of force extend to the defence of others? These are some of the issues explored by Dr Uniacke in this comprehensive 1994 philosophical discussion of the principles relevant to self-defence as a moral and legal justification of homicide. She establishes a unitary right of self-defence and the defence of others, one which grounds the permissibility of the (...)
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  14. Suzanne M. Uniacke (1984). The Doctrine of Double Effect. The Thomist 48 (2):188.
     
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  15.  15
    Suzanne Uniacke (1989). Killing Under Duress. Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (1):53-70.
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  16.  11
    Suzanne Uniacke (1999). Absolutely Clean Hands? Responsibility for What's Allowed in Refraining From What's Not Allowed. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (2):189 – 209.
    This paper examines the absolutist grounds for denying an agent's responsibility for what he allows to happen in 'keeping his hands clean' in acute circumstances. In defending an agent's non-prevention of what is, viewed impersonally, the greater harm in such cases, absolutists typically insist on a difference in responsibility between what an agent brings about as opposed to what he allows. This alleged difference is taken to be central to the absolutist justification of non-intervention in acute cases: the agent's obligation (...)
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  17.  2
    Suzanne Uniacke (2013). Self‐Defense. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
  18.  6
    Suzanne Uniacke (2010). Editorial Note. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (1):1-1.
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  19.  5
    Suzanne Uniacke & Alan Carter (2008). Editorial. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):1–1.
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  20.  3
    Suzanne Uniacke & Sandra Marshall (2002). Editorial Introduction and Call for Papers. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):1–2.
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  21. Suzanne Uniacke (2006). Editorial Note. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):ii-ii.
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  22. Suzanne Uniacke (2007). On Getting One's Retaliation in First. In Henry Shue & David Rodin (eds.), Preemption: Military Action and Moral Justification. OUP Oxford
     
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  23. Suzanne Uniacke (2014). Opportunistic Terrorism. Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):395-410.
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  24. Suzanne Uniacke (1996). Permissible Killing: The Self-Defence Justification of Homicide. Cambridge University Press.
    Do individuals have a positive right of self-defence? And if so, what are the limits of this right? Under what conditions does this use of force extend to the defence of others? These are some of the issues explored by Dr Uniacke in this comprehensive 1994 philosophical discussion of the principles relevant to self-defence as a moral and legal justification of homicide. She establishes a unitary right of self-defence and the defence of others, one which grounds the permissibility of the (...)
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  25. Suzanne Uniacke (2012). Permissible Killing: The Self-Defence Justification of Homicide. Cambridge University Press.
    Do individuals have a positive right of self-defence? And if so, what are the limits of this right? Under what conditions does this use of force extend to the defence of others? These are some of the issues explored by Dr Uniacke in this comprehensive 1994 philosophical discussion of the principles relevant to self-defence as a moral and legal justification of homicide. She establishes a unitary right of self-defence and the defence of others, one which grounds the permissibility of the (...)
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  26. Suzanne Uniacke (2010). Responsibility : Intention and Consequence. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge
     
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  27. Suzanne Uniacke (1991). Speech, Crime, and the Uses of Language. Philosophical Books 32 (4):248-249.
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