Search results for 'Suzy Anger' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Suzy Anger (2005). Victorian Interpretation. Cornell University Press.
    Victorian scriptural hermeneutics : history, intention, and evolution -- Intertext 1 : Victorian legal interpretation -- Carlyle : between biblical exegesis and romantic hermeneutics -- Intertext 2 : Victorian science and hermeneutics : the interpretation of nature -- George Eliot's hermeneutics of sympathy -- Intertext 3 : Victorian literary criticism -- Subjectivism, intersubjectivity, and intention : Oscar Wilde and literary hermeneutics.
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  2.  3
    Douglas Anger (1956). The Dependence of Interresponse Times Upon the Relative Reinforcement of Different Interresponse Times. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (3):145.
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  3.  15
    Piter Anger (1996). Odbrana skepticizma. Theoria 39 (2):127-144.
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  4.  2
    Douglas Anger (1988). The Balance Equation: Part 2. Derivation of the Balance Equation for Response-Specific Inhibition. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (1):55-58.
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  5.  2
    Wendell Stone, David O. Lyon & Douglas Anger (1978). Suppression of Postpellet Licking by a Pavlovian S+. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 12 (2):117-119.
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  6. Douglas Anger (1987). The Balance Equation: Part 1. Response-Specific Inhibition and the Operant-Contingency Puzzles. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (6):468-471.
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  7.  3
    Frank D. Anger & Rita V. Rodriguez (1991). Time, Tense, and Relativity Revisited. In B. Bouchon-Meunier, R. R. Yager & L. A. Zadeh (eds.), Uncertainty in Knowledge Bases. Springer 286--295.
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  8. Violaine Anger & Jan Willem Noldus (eds.) (2005). Le Sens de la Musique: 1750-1900: Vivaldi, Beethoven, Berlioz, Liszt, Debussy, Stravinski. Rue D'Ulm.
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  9. Gottfried Anger, James Paul Wesley & Hans Kaegelmann (eds.) (2005). Was von Moderner Physik Bleibt Und Fällt. Argo.
    1. Bd. Die Relativitätstheorie fällt : physikalische, philosophische, wissenschaftssoziologische und allgemeinverständliche Korrektur : hundert Jahre Kultus des Irrtums sind genug -- 3. Bd. Die Urknalltheorie fällt.
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  10. Anthony Cunningham (2005). Great Anger. The Dalhousie Review 85 (3).
    Anger has an undeniable hand in human suffering and horrific deeds. Various schools of thought call for eliminating or moderating the capacity for anger. I argue that the capacity for anger, like the capacity for grief, is at the heart of our humanity.
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  11. Zac Cogley (2014). A Study of Virtuous and Vicious Anger. In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press 199.
    This chapter presents an account of an angrily virtuous, or patient, person informed by research on emotion in empirical and philosophical psychology. It is argued that virtue for anger is determined by excellence and deficiency with respect to all three of anger’s psychological functions: appraisal, motivation, and communication. Many competing accounts of virtue for anger assess it by attention to just one function; it is argued that singular evaluations of a person’s anger will ignore important dimensions (...)
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  12.  26
    Eva-Maria Engelen (2009). Anger, Shame and Justice: The Regulative Function of Emotions in the Ancient and Modern World. In Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Hans Markowitsch (eds.), Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes. Springer 395-413.
    Analyzing the ancient Greek point of view concerning anger, shame and justice and a very modern one, one can see, that anger has a regulative function, but shame does as well. Anger puts the other in his place, thereby regulating hierarchies. Shame regulates the social relations of recognition. And both emotions also have an evaluative function, because anger evaluates a situation with regard to a humiliation; shame, with regard to a misdemeanor. In addition, attention has to (...)
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  13.  4
    Sheldene Simola (2010). Anti-Corporate Anger as a Form of Care-Based Moral Agency. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):255 - 269.
    Conventional management strategies for anti-corporate anger involve its negative construal as an inappropriate irrationality in need of containment. An alternative account is offered in which such anger comprises a healthy and health-sustaining component of care-based moral agency directed not only toward the affiliative advancement of connection among community members, but also toward the (political) resistance to violation, injustice, and carelessness through which disconnection from responsive community relationships occurs. The role of anger in care-based moral agency is demonstrated (...)
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  14.  7
    Elisa Gambetti & Fiorella Giusberti (2009). Dispositional Anger and Risk Decision-Making. Mind and Society 8 (1):7-20.
    In this study, we assessed the influence of trait anger on decisions in risky situations evaluating how it might interact with some contextual factors. One hundred and fifty-eight participants completed the Trait Anger scale of STAXI-2 and an inventory consisting of a battery of hypothetical everyday decision-making scenarios, representative of three specific domains: financial, social and health. Participants were also asked to evaluate familiarity and salience for each scenario. This study provides evidence for a relationship between individual differences (...)
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  15.  36
    Nicolas Bommarito (2011). Bile & Bodhisattvas: Śāntideva on Justified Anger. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 18:357-81.
    In his famous text the Bodhicaryāvatāra, the 8th century Buddhist philosopher Śāntideva argues that anger towards people who harm us is never justified. The usual reading of this argument rests on drawing similarities between harms caused by persons and those caused by non-persons. After laying out my own interpretation of Śāntideva's reasoning, I offer some objections to Śāntideva's claim about the similarity between animate and inanimate causes of harm inspired by contemporary philosophical literature in the West. Following this, I (...)
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  16.  51
    Raffaele Rodogno (2010). Guit, Anger, and Retribution. Legal Theory 16 (1):59-76.
    This article focuses primarily on the emotion of guilt as providing a justification for retributive legal punishment. In particular, I challenge the claim according to which guilt can function as part of our epistemic justification of positive retributivism, that is, the view that wrongdoing is both necessary and sufficient to justify punishment. I show that the argument to this conclusion rests on two premises: (1) to feel guilty typically involves the judgment that one deserves punishment; and (2) those who feel (...)
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  17.  20
    Benoît Dubreuil (2015). Anger and Morality. Topoi 34 (2):475-482.
    The emotion of anger has a long love–hate relationship with morality. On the one hand, anger often motivates us to sanction wrongdoing and uphold demanding moral standards. On the other hand, it can prompt aggression behaviors that are at odds with morality and even lead to moral disasters. This article describes this complex relationship. I argue that the intensity of anger elicited by moral transgressions is highly sensitive to key variables, including the identity of the person wronged, (...)
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  18.  30
    Kristin Borgwald (2012). Women's Anger, Epistemic Personhood, and Self-Respect: An Application of Lehrer's Work on Self-Trust. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):69-76.
    I argue in this paper that the work of Keith Lehrer, especially in his book Self-Trust has applications to feminist ethics; specifically care ethics, which has become the leading form of normative sentimentalist ethics. I extend Lehrer's ideas concerning reason and justification of belief beyond what he says by applying the notion of evaluation central to his account of acceptance to the need for evaluation of emotions. The inability to evaluate and attain justification of one's emotions is an epistemic failure (...)
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  19.  72
    Glen Pettigrove (2012). Meekness and 'Moral' Anger. Ethics 122 (2):341-370.
    If asked to generate a list of virtues, most people would not include meekness. So it is surprising that Hume not only deems it a virtue, but one whose 'tendency to the good of society no one can doubt of.' After explaining what Hume and his contemporaries meant by "meekness", the paper proceeds to argue that meekness is a virtue we, too, should endorse.
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  20.  40
    Derk Pereboom (2009). Free Will, Love and Anger. Ideas Y Valores 141 (141):5-25.
    I have argued we are not free in the sense required for moral responsibility, while at the same time a conception of life without this type of free will would not be devastating to morality or to our sense of meaning in life, and in certain respects it may even be beneficial (cf. Pereboom 2001). In ..
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  21.  2
    G. S. Gates (1926). An Observational Study of Anger. Journal of Experimental Psychology 9 (4):325.
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  22. Ermin Francis Micka (1943). The Problem of Divine Anger in Arnobius and Lactantius. Washington, D.C.,The Catholic University of America Press.
     
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  23.  66
    Rowland Stout (2010). Seeing the Anger in Someone's Face. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):29-43.
    Starting from the assumption that one can literally perceive someone's anger in their face, I argue that this would not be possible if what is perceived is a static facial signature of their anger. There is a product–process distinction in talk of facial expression, and I argue that one can see anger in someone's facial expression only if this is understood to be a process rather than a product.
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  24.  19
    Chase E. Thiel, Shane Connelly & Jennifer A. Griffith (2011). The Influence of Anger on Ethical Decision Making: Comparison of a Primary and Secondary Appraisal. Ethics and Behavior 21 (5):380 - 403.
    Higher order cognitive processes, including ethical decision making (EDM), are influenced by the experiencing of discrete emotions. Recent research highlights the negative influence one such emotion, anger, has on EDM and its underlying processes. The mechanism, however, by which anger disrupts the EDM has not been investigated. The current study sought to discover whether cognitive appraisals of an emotion-evoking event are the driving mechanisms behind the influence of anger on EDM. One primary (goal obstacle) and one secondary (...)
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  25.  14
    Roberto Gutierrez, Roger Giner-Sorolla & Milica Vasiljevic (2012). Just an Anger Synonym? Moral Context Influences Predictors of Disgust Word Use. Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):53-64.
    Are verbal reports of disgust in moral situations specific indicators of the concept of disgust, or are they used metaphorically to refer to anger? In this experiment, participants read scenarios describing a violation of a norm either about the use of the body (bodily moral) or about harm and rights (socio-moral). They then expressed disgust and anger on verbal scales, and through facial expression endorsement measures. The use of disgust words in the socio-moral condition was largely predicted by (...)
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  26. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (2002). Are Envy, Anger, and Resentment Moral Emotions? Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):148 – 154.
    The moral status of emotions has recently become the focus of various philosophical investigations. Certain emotions that have traditionally been considered as negative, such as envy, jealousy, pleasure-in-others'-misfortune, and pride, have been defended. Some traditionally "negative" emotions have even been declared to be moral emotions. In this brief paper, I suggest two basic criteria according to which an emotion might be considered moral, and I then examine whether envy, anger, and resentment are moral emotions.
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  27.  22
    Florian Cova, Julien Deonna & David Sander (2013). The Emotional Shape of Our Moral Life: Anger-Related Emotions and Mutualistic Anthropology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):86 - 87.
    The evolutionary hypothesis advanced by Baumard et al. makes precise predictions on which emotions should play the main role in our moral lives: morality should be more closely linked to emotions (like contempt and disgust) than to emotions (like anger). Here, we argue that these predictions run contrary to most psychological evidence.
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  28.  17
    Glen Pettigrove & Koji Tanaka (2013). Anger and Moral Judgment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):1-18.
    Although theorists disagree about precisely how to characterize the link between anger and moral judgment, that they are linked is routinely taken for granted in contemporary metaethics and philosophy of emotion. One problem with this assumption is that it ignores virtues like patience, which thinkers as different as Cassian, ??ntideva, and Maimonides have argued are characteristic of mature moral agents. The patient neither experience nor plan to experience anger in response to (at least some) wrongs. Nevertheless, we argue, (...)
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  29. Trevor J. Saunders (1973). Plato on Killing in Anger: A Reply to Professor Woozley. Philosophical Quarterly 23 (93):350-356.
    In response to woozley's paper in "philosophical quarterly" 22 (1972), 303-17, This article argues: (a) that plato's penology in the laws is radically 'reformative'. (b) that his overriding concern is not with blame or guilt or moral responsibility, But with an exact diagnosis and then 'cure' of the criminal's 'unjust' state of mind. (c) that he uses 'hekousios' and 'akousios' in effect in the sense 'prompted by injustice in the soul of the agent' and 'not thus prompted' respectively. (d) that (...)
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  30.  5
    David J. Hauser, Margaret S. Carter & Brian P. Meier (2009). Mellow Monday and Furious Friday: The Approach-Related Link Between Anger and Time Representation. Cognition and Emotion 23 (6):1166-1180.
    (2009). Mellow Monday and furious Friday: The approach-related link between anger and time representation. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 23, No. 6, pp. 1166-1180.
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  31.  13
    Kristjan Kristjansson (2005). Can We Teach Justified Anger? Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (4):671-689.
    The question of whether there is such a thing as teachable justified anger encompasses three distinct questions: the psychological question of whether the emotions in general, and anger in particular, are regulatable; the moral question of whether anger can ever be morally justified; and the educational question of whether we have any sound methods at our disposal for teaching justified anger. In this paper I weave Aristotelian responses to those questions together with insights from the current (...)
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  32.  17
    Patricia White (2012). Making Political Anger Possible: A Task for Civic Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (1):1-13.
    The article asks whether political anger has a legitimate place in a democracy, as this is a political system designed to resolve conflicts by peaceful negotiation. It distinguishes personal from social anger and political anger, to focus explicitly on the latter. It argues that both the feeling and expression of political anger are subject to normative constraints, often specific to social status and gender. The article examines arguments, including those of Seneca, in favour of an (...)-free society. It concludes, however, that a democracy cannot dispense with political anger, which has a vital role to play in protecting things of value. This role demands a civic education such that when democratic values are under threat citizens will not feel apathetic or simply fearful, but angry and possessed of a repertoire of ways of expressing democratic anger. (shrink)
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  33.  61
    Peter Vernezze (2008). Moderation or the Middle Way: Two Approaches to Anger. Philosophy East and West 58 (1):2-16.
    : Most of us tend to be Aristotelians when it comes to anger. While admitting that uncontrolled anger is harmful and ought to be avoided, we reject as undesirable a state of being that would not allow us to express legitimate outrage. Hence, we seem to find a compelling moral attitude in Aristotle’s belief that we should get angry at the right time and for the right reasons and in the right way. Buddhism and Stoicism, however, carve out (...)
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  34.  28
    Jen Mcweeny (2010). Liberating Anger, Embodying Knowledge: A Comparative Study of María Lugones and Zen Master Hakuin. Hypatia 25 (2):295 - 315.
    This paper strengthens the theoretical ground of feminist analyses of anger by explaining how the angers of the oppressed are ways of knowing. Relying on insights created through the juxtaposition of Latina feminism and Zen Buddhism, I argue that these angers are special kinds of embodied perceptions that surface when there is a profound lack of fit between a particular bodily orientation and its framing world of sense. As openings to alternative sensibilities, these angers are transformative, liberatory, and deeply (...)
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  35. Andrea Westlund (2009). Anger, Faith, and Forgiveness. The Monist 92 (4):507-536.
    Right after our tragedy, my idea of forgiveness was to be free of this thing, – the anger, the pain, the absorption. It was totally personal. It was a survival tactic to leave this experience behind. It had nothing to do with the offender. The second level was realizing how the word forgiveness applies to the relationship between the victim and the offender. How it means accepting and working on that relationship after a murder. The latter is more complicated. (...)
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  36.  22
    Michael Rota (2007). The Moral Status of Anger: Thomas Aquinas and John Cassian. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):395-418.
    Is anger at another person ever a morally excellent thing? Two competing answers to this question can be found in the Christian intellectual tradition. JohnCassian held that anger at another person is never morally virtuous. Aquinas, taking an Aristotelian line, maintained that anger at another person is sometimes morally virtuous. In this paper I explore the positions of Cassian and Aquinas on this issue. The core of my paper consists in a close examination of two arguments given (...)
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  37.  4
    Rodrigo Sebastián Braicovich (2015). Therapeutic strategies and intellectualism in on anger by seneca. Ideas Y Valores 64 (158):85-105.
    Pretendo demostrar que a) el tratado De ira de Séneca incluye no una sino dos estrategias terapéuticas diseñadas para evitar la ira, y que b) que la segunda de estas estrategias -la cual ha sido desatendida en la literatura secundaria- presenta problemas irresolubles cuando la contrastamos contra la teoría estoica de la acción, la cual se funda en premisas intelectualistas. I try to show that a) the treatise On Anger by Seneca includes not one but two therapeutic strategies designed (...)
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  38.  48
    Stephen Leighton (2002). Aristotle's Account of Anger: Narcissism and Illusions of Self-Sufficiency. Ratio 15 (1):23–45.
    This paper considers an allegation by M. Stocker and E. Hegeman that Aristotle’s account of anger yields a narcissistic passion bedevilled by illusions of self-sufficiency. The paper argues on behalf of Aristotle’s valuing of anger within a virtuous and flourishing life, showing that and why Aristotle’s account is neither narcissistic nor involves illusions of self-sufficiency. In so arguing a deeper appreciation of Aristotle’s understanding of a self-sufficient life is reached, as are some interesting contrasts between Aristotle's understanding of (...)
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  39.  5
    Michael Rota (2008). The Moral Status of Anger. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):395 - 418.
    Is anger at another person ever a morally excellent thing? Two competing answers to this question can be found in the Christian intellectual tradition. JohnCassian held that anger at another person is never morally virtuous. Aquinas, taking an Aristotelian line, maintained that anger at another person is sometimes morally virtuous. In this paper I explore the positions of Cassian and Aquinas on this issue. The core of my paper consists in a close examination of two arguments given (...)
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  40.  27
    Gregory Sadler (2008). Forgiveness, Anger, and Virtue in an Aristotelean Perspective. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:229-247.
    Aristotle figures significantly in the recent boom of literature on forgiveness, particularly accounts wishing to construe forgiveness as a virtue. While his definition of anger is often invoked, he is also a foil for accounts valuing forgiveness more than did Aristotle. I argue through interpretive exegesis of Aristotle’s texts that, while there are definite limits on forgiveness in his thought, so that his notion of forgiveness does not extend as far as in Christian ethics, it does play a significant (...)
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  41.  8
    Aaron N. Sell (2013). Revenge Can Be More Fully Understood by Making Distinctions Between Anger and Hatred. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):36-37.
    McCullough et al. present a compelling case that anger-based revenge is designed to disincentivize the target from imposing costs on the vengeful individual. Here I present a contrast between revenge motivated by anger and revenge motivated by hatred, which remains largely unexplored in the literature.
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  42.  41
    Michael Potegal (2005). Characteristics of Anger: Notes for a Systems Theory of Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):215-216.
    Although emotion may subserve social function, as with anger-maintaining dominance, emotions are more than variant cognitions. Anger promotes risk-taking, attention-narrowing, and cognitive impairment. The proposition that appraised “blameworthiness” is necessary for anger excludes young children's anger as well as adults' pain-induced anger. To be complete, any systems model of anger must account for its temporal characteristics, including escalation and persistence.
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  43.  41
    Marion K. Underwood (2005). Observing Anger and Aggression Among Preadolescent Girls and Boys: Ethical Dilemmas and Practical Solutions. Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):235 – 245.
    To understand how children manage anger and engage in various forms of aggression, it is important to observe children responding to peer provocation. Observing children's anger and aggression poses serious ethical and practical challenges, especially with samples of older children and adolescents. This article describes 2 laboratory methods for observing children's responses to peer provocation: 1 involves participants playing a game with a provoking child actor, and the other involves a pair of close friends responding to an actor (...)
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  44.  4
    S. C. Barton (2015). 'Be Angry But Do Not Sin' : Sin and the Emotions in the New Testament with Special Reference to Anger. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):21-34.
    A presupposition of this essay is that a Christian understanding of sin should give attention to the emotions. Taking anger as a case in point, an account is offered of the paraenēsis in Eph. 4:26 where anger and sin are juxtaposed. The main argument is that the teaching about anger has to be situated in relation to the moral-theological vision of Ephesians as a whole, central to which is the coming together as one of Jews and Gentiles (...)
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  45.  15
    W. V. Harris (1997). Saving the Φαινόμενα: A Note on Aristotle's Definition of Anger. Classical Quarterly 47 (02):452-.
    In his Rhetoric Aristotle gives six definitions of emotions in approximately the following form, with the word . Does he mean ‘Let anger be a reaching-out, accompanied by pain, for conspicuous revenge for some conspicuous slight to oneself or one's own, the slight not having been deserved’, or should αινομένηςίην be taken to mean ‘manifest, plain’, or should it be translated ‘perceived, apparent’? Since this is his fullest definition of anger, the question deserves discussion, even though a number (...)
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  46. Roderick T. Long, Thinking Our Anger.
    (to table of contents of archives) This talk was delivered at the Auburn Philosophical Society’s Roundtable on Hate, 5 October 2001, convened in response to the September 11 attacks a month earlier. The events of September 11th have occasioned a wide variety of responses, ranging from calls to turn the other cheek, to calls to nuke half the Middle East—and every imaginable shade of opinion in between. At a time when emotions run high, how should we go about deciding on (...)
     
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  47.  16
    Julie A. Hubbard (2005). Eliciting and Measuring Children's Anger in the Context of Their Peer Interactions: Ethical Considerations and Practical Guidelines. Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):247 – 258.
    Ecologically valid procedures for eliciting and measuring children's anger are needed to enhance researchers' theories of children's emotional competence and to guide intervention efforts aimed at reactive aggression. The purpose of this article is to describe a laboratory-based game-playing procedure that has been used successfully to elicit and measure children's anger across observational, physiological, and self-report channels. Steps taken to ensure that participants are treated ethically and fairly are discussed. The article highlights recently published data that emphasize the (...)
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  48.  11
    Niranjan S. Karnik (2000). Foster Children and ADHD: Anger, Violence, and Institutional Power. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (4):199-214.
    This paper explores the ways in which foster children and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) intersect as social and medical categories. Through the method of interpretive biography based on the official case file, this paper shows how the experiences of violence and ADHD become linked in the child's life through the emotion of anger. In this way, it is possible to see how the power dynamics of the medical, educational and welfare systems lock the diagnosis with its embedded meanings (...)
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  49.  6
    Daniel John Zizzo (2008). Anger and Economic Rationality. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (2):147-167.
    This paper evaluates the rationality of anger in the light of a standard notion of economic rationality. Whether anger is rational or otherwise cannot be answered in general, but will depend on the economic setting. As long as anger can be explained as a preference in a parsimonious and stable utility function, it does not make sense to talk of anger as rational or irrational. The production of anger is subtly mediated by many cognitive factors. (...)
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  50.  10
    Lucas A. Swaine (1996). Blameless, Constructive, and Political Anger. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (3):257–274.
    Scholars of the emotions maintain that all anger requires an object of blame. In order to be angry, many writers argue, one must believe than an actor has done serious damage to something that one values. Yet an individual may be angered without blaming another. This kind of emotion, called situational anger, does not entail a corresponding object of blame. Situational anger can be a useful force in public life, enabling citizens to draw attention to the seriousness (...)
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