Search results for 'T. A. N. Paul' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. T. A. N. Paul (2010). Reason, Politics and Evangelisation. Heythrop Journal 53 (3):467-478.score: 2010.0
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  2. Charles B. Cousar (forthcoming). Book Review: Inhabiting the Cruciform God: Kenosis, Justification, and Theosis in Paul's Narrative Soteriology by Michael J. Gorman Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 2009. 394 Pp. $24.00. ISBN 978-0-8028-6265-5.; Justification: God's Plan and Paul's Vision by N. T. Wright InterVarsity, Downers Groves, Ill., 2009. 279 Pp. $25.00 (Cloth). ISBN 978-0-8308-3863-9.; The Deliverance of God: An Apocalyptic Rereading of Justification in Paul by Douglas A. Campbell Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 2009. 1,248 Pp. $60.00 (Cloth). ISBN 978-0-8028-3126-2. [REVIEW] Interpretation 64 (4):414-416.score: 576.0
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  3. Pascal Engel (2014). Y a-t-il eu vraiment une rencontre entre Ricœur et la philosophie analytique? Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 5 (1):125-141.score: 252.0
    Paul Ricœur made a lot to introduce analytic philosophy in France during the 70s and 80s, and he engaged in a dialogue with a number of authors from this tradition, such as Austin, Strawson, Davidson or Parfit. This dialogue, though, was one-sided, since there was no discussion of his views by analytic philosophers. Moreover, Ricœur often misunderstood or misprepresented the analytic views that he was discussing. So in many ways the Ricœur’s encounter with analytic philosophy was unsuccessful, which does (...)
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  4. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 246.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  5. Andreas Vrahimis (2013). "Was There a Sun Before Men Existed?": A. J. Ayer and French Philosophy in the Fifties. Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 1 (9).score: 228.0
    In contrast to many of his contemporaries, A. J. Ayer was an analytic philosopher who had sustained throughout his career some interest in developments in the work of his ‘continental’ peers. Ayer, who spoke French, held friendships with some important Parisian intellectuals, such as Camus, Bataille, Wahl and Merleau-Ponty. This paper examines the circumstances of a meeting between Ayer, Merleau-Ponty, Wahl, Ambrosino and Bataille, which took place in 1951 at some Parisian bar. The question under discussion during this meeting was (...)
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  6. John W. Lenz, Paul Oskar Kristeller, Willis Doney, Norman Kretzmann, Colin Murray Turbayne, Arthur Pap, E. M. Adams, T. A. Goudge, Edward H. Madden, Rudolf Allers, Hans Jonas, Lawrence W. Beals, Philip Nochlin, Ethel M. Albert, Mary Mothersill, John W. Blyth, Hector N. Castañeda, Milton C. Nahm & Joseph Margolis (1957). The American Philosophical Association Eastern Division: Abstracts of Papers to Be Read at the Fifty-Fourth Annual Meeting, Harvard University, December 27-29, 1957. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 54 (24):773-794.score: 198.0
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  7. Timothy Morton (2011). Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones. Continent 1 (3):149-155.score: 198.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  8. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).score: 198.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  9. Delia Graff Fara (forthcoming). Names Are Predicates. Philosophical Review.score: 192.0
    Tyler Burge convinced us that names are predicates in at least some of their occurrences: -/- There are relatively few Alfreds in Princeton. -/- Names, when predicates, satisfy the being-called condition: schematically, a name "N" is true of a thing just in case that thing is called N. This paper defends the unified view that names are predicates in all of their occurrences. I follow Clarence Sloat, Paul Elbourne, and Ora Matushansky in saying that when a name seems to (...)
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  10. Peter Hanks (2009). Teaching and Learning Guide For: Recent Work on Propositions. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):889-892.score: 192.0
    Some of the most interesting recent work in philosophy of language and metaphysics is focused on questions about propositions, the abstract, truth-bearing contents of sentences and beliefs. The aim of this guide is to give instructors and students a road map for some significant work on propositions since the mid-1990s. This work falls roughly into two areas: challenges to the existence of propositions and theories about the nature and structure of propositions. The former includes both a widely discussed puzzle about (...)
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  11. William P. Alston & Jonathan Bennett (1984). Identity and Cardinality: Geach and Frege. Philosophical Review 93 (4):553-567.score: 192.0
    P. T. Geach, notoriously, holds the Relative Identity Thesis, according to which a meaningful judgment of identity is always, implicitly or explicitly, relative to some general term. ‘The same’ is a fragmentary expression, and has no significance unless we say or mean ‘the same X’, where ‘X’ represents a general term (what Frege calls a Begriffswort or Begriffsausdruck). (P. T. Geach, Mental Acts (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1957), p. 69. I maintain that it makes no sense to judge (...)
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  12. Sandra Shapshay (ed.) (2009). Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 192.0
    Bioethics at the Movies explores the ways in which popular films engage basic bioethical concepts and concerns. Twenty philosophically grounded essays use cinematic tools such as character and plot development, scene-setting, and narrative-framing to demonstrate a range of principles and topics in contemporary medical ethics. The first section plumbs popular and bioethical thought on birth, abortion, genetic selection, and personhood through several films, including The Cider House Rules, Citizen Ruth, Gattaca, and I, Robot. In the second section, the contributors examine (...)
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  13. Lynne P. Kaplan, James Grieshop, Paul DeBach, Ronald D. Oetting, Frank S. Morishita, Roland N. Jefferson, Wesley A. Humphrey, Seward T. Besemer, Albert O. Paulus & Jerry Nelson (1977). 4-H Community Pride Program. In Vincent Stuart (ed.), Order. Distributed by Random House.score: 192.0
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  14. St Thomas Aquinas, Richard J. Bernstein, Bernard Bosanquet, Robert Brandom, James Henry Breasted, Joseph Brent, Rodney A. Brooks & Wendell T. Bush (2002). Carnap, Rudolf, 17,114,115 N, 227, 252 Cams, Paul, 43 Chisholm, Roderick, 17 Chomsky, Noam, 130. In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 192.0
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  15. E. Sayan (1988). A Closer Look at the Chinese Nation Argument. Philosophy Research Archives 13:129-36.score: 168.0
    Ned Block’s Chinese Nation Argument is offered as a counterexample to Turing-machine functionalism. According to that argument, one billion Chinese could be organized to instantiate Turing-machine descriptions of mental states. Since we wouldn’t want to impute qualia to such an organized population, functionalism cannot account for the qualitative character of mental states like pain. Paul Churchland and Patricia Churchland have challenged that argument by trying to show that an adequate representation of the complexity of mind requires at least 10 (...)
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  16. Arthur Paul Pedersen & Itai Ben Yaacov, A Proof of Completeness for Continuous First-Order Logic.score: 156.0
    Continuous first-order logic has found interest among model theorists who wish to extend the classical analysis of “algebraic” structures (such as fields, group, and graphs) to various natural classes of complete metric structures (such as probability algebras, Hilbert spaces, and Banach spaces). With research in continuous first-order logic preoccupied with studying the model theory of this framework, we find a natural question calls for attention. Is there an interesting set of axioms yielding a completeness result? The primary purpose of this (...)
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  17. Eleonore Stump, Charles B. Schmitt, James J. Murphy, M. Mugnai, Robin Smith, C. W. Kilmister, N. C. A. da Costa, von G. Schenk, Robert Bunn, D. W. Barron & A. Grieder (1982). Bokk Review. History and Philosophy of Logic 3 (2):213-240.score: 156.0
    MEDIEVAL LOGICS LAMBERT MARIE DE RIJK (ed.), Die mittelalterlichen Traktate De mod0 opponendiet respondendi, Einleitung und Ausgabe der einschlagigen Texte. (Beitrage zur Geschichte der Philosophie und Theologie des Mittelalters, Neue Folge Band 17.) Miinster: Aschendorff, 1980. 379 pp. No price stated. THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY MARTA FATTORI, Lessico del Novum Organum di Francesco Bacone. Rome: Edizioni dell'Ateneo 1980. Two volumes, il + 543, 520 pp. Lire 65.000. VIVIAN SALMON, The study of language in 17th century England. (Amsterdam Studies in the Theory (...)
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  18. Paul Schweizer (1992). A Syntactical Approach to Modality. Journal of Philosophical Logic 21 (1):1 - 31.score: 156.0
    The systems T N and T M show that necessity can be consistently construed as a predicate of syntactical objects, if the expressive/deductive power of the system is deliberately engineered to reflect the power of the original object language operator. The system T N relies on salient limitations on the expressive power of the language L N through the construction of a quotational hierarchy, while the system T Mrelies on limiting the scope of the modal axioms schemas to the sublanguage (...)
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  19. Itaï Ben Yaacov & Arthur Paul Pedersen (2010). A Proof of Completeness for Continuous First-Order Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (1):168-190.score: 156.0
    Continuous first-order logic has found interest among model theorists who wish to extend the classical analysis of "algebraic" structures (such as fields, group, and graphs) to various natural classes of complete metric structures (such as probability algebras, Hilbert spaces, and Banach spaces). With research in continuous first-order logic preoccupied with studying the model theory of this framework, we find a natural question calls for attention. Is there an interesting set of axioms yielding a completeness result? The primary purpose of this (...)
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  20. Joseph Paul Stemberger (1999). Frequency Determines Defaults in German: Default Perfect -T Versus Irregular Plural -S. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):1040-1041.score: 156.0
    The German facts are consistent with the hypothesis that the default is the most frequent allomorph. Plural -s is the least frequent allomorph and does not act as a default. There is another way to measure the frequency of perfects in which no single -n allomorph is as frequent as -t. Lexical versus computational components do not correlate with regularity.
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  21. S. Morris Eames, Robert N. Fisher, Daniel T. Primozic, Peter A. Day, Joel A. Thompson & Albert A. Harrison (2003). Paul Custodio Bube and Jeffery Geller, Eds., Conversations with Pragma-Tism. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2002, 126 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 90-420-1560-8, $27.00 (Pb). Stephen Darwall, Ed., Consequentialism. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Pub-Lishing, 2003, 301 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-631-23108-0 (Pb). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 37:583-584.score: 144.0
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  22. Mike LaBossiere (2008). What Don't You Know?: Philosophical Provocations. Continuum.score: 144.0
    _ "LaBossiere brilliantly tackles many of the toughest ethical dilemmas of our times, from gender selection, cloning and sexual inequality to violence in the media and the conduct of warfare. In an age of snap judgments and stereotypes, he approaches his topics in a refreshingly open-minded fashion. His quick wit and firm knowledge of contemporary culture bring philosophy full-force into the 21st century." —Paul Halpern, Professor Of Physics, University Of The Sciences in Philadelphia and author of What's Science Ever (...)
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  23. Paul-Antoine Miquel (2005). Qu'y at-il de vital dans un organisme vivant? Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique 1 (1).score: 120.0
    Introduction 1) Une épistémologie non fondationnelle § 1. Concernant l?usage philosophique de l?adjectif « vital », on s?attend à voir surgir une distinction entre le vivant et le vécu, comme si d?emblée nous pouvions et devions accepter que le vital soit aussi quelque chose d?éprouvé par la conscience, par opposition au vivant qui serait simplement observé et expliqué par la science. Pourquoi, dès lors, faudrait-il rechercher dans ou chez les êtres vivants quelque chose de vital ? Cela ne reviendrait-il pas (...)
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  24. Paul E. Oppenheimer & Edward N. Zalta (1991). On the Logic of the Ontological Argument. Philosophical Perspectives 5:509-529.score: 96.0
    In this paper, the authors show that there is a reading of St. Anselm's ontological argument in Proslogium II that is logically valid (the premises entail the conclusion). This reading takes Anselm's use of the definite description "that than which nothing greater can be conceived" seriously. Consider a first-order language and logic in which definite descriptions are genuine terms, and in which the quantified sentence "there is an x such that..." does not imply "x exists". Then, using an ordinary logic (...)
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  25. Paul E. Oppenheimer & Edward N. Zalta (2007). Reflections on the Logic of the Ontological Argument. Studia Neoaristotelica 4 (1):28-35.score: 96.0
    In this paper, the authors evaluate the ontological argument they developed in their 1991 paper as to soundness. They focus on Anselm's first premise, which asserts: there is a conceivable thing than which nothing greater is conceivable. After suggesting reasons why this premise is false, the authors show that there is a reading of this premise on which it is true. Such a premise can be used in a valid and sound reconstruction of the ontological argument. This argument is developed (...)
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  26. Paul Oppenheimer & Edward N. Zalta (2011). Relations Vs Functions at the Foundations of Logic: Type-Theoretic Considerations. Journal of Logic and Computation 21:351-374.score: 96.0
    Though Frege was interested primarily in reducing mathematics to logic, he succeeded in reducing an important part of logic to mathematics by defining relations in terms of functions. By contrast, Whitehead & Russell reduced an important part of mathematics to logic by defining functions in terms of relations (using the definite description operator). We argue that there is a reason to prefer Whitehead & Russell's reduction of functions to relations over Frege's reduction of relations to functions. There is an interesting (...)
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  27. Paul Peterson, N Ews F Ocus.score: 96.0
    STILLWATER, MINNESOTA—Two men sit at a long table, oblivious to the breakfast-time commotion. One moves a coffee cup from one side of a water glass to the other. “If I look here and don’t see the cup,” he says to the other, “then I know it must be there.” It sounds like a “deep” exchange between swotty young philosophy majors. But the fellow moving the cup has gray hair— and a Nobel Prize in physics. Sliding the porcelain, Anthony Leggett of (...)
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