Search results for 'T. Bayes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Philip M. Fernbach & Steven A. Sloman (2011). Don't Throw Out the Bayes with the Bathwater. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):198-199.score: 72.0
    We highlight one way in which Jones & Love (J&L) misconstrue the Bayesian program: Bayesian models do not represent a rejection of mechanism. This mischaracterization obscures the valid criticisms in their article. We conclude that computational-level Bayesian modeling should not be rejected or discouraged a priori, but should be held to the same empirical standards as other models.
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  2. Festa, Roberto, Optimum Inductive Methods. A Study in Inductive Probability, Bayesian Statistics, and Verisimilitude.score: 24.0
    According to the Bayesian view, scientific hypotheses must be appraised in terms of their posterior probabilities relative to the available experimental data. Such posterior probabilities are derived from the prior probabilities of the hypotheses by applying Bayes'theorem. One of the most important problems arising within the Bayesian approach to scientific methodology is the choice of prior probabilities. Here this problem is considered in detail w.r.t. two applications of the Bayesian approach: (1) the theory of inductive probabilities (TIP) developed by (...)
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  3. Igor Douven (2009). Assertion, Moore, and Bayes. Philosophical Studies 144 (3):361 - 375.score: 24.0
    It is widely believed that the so-called knowledge account of assertion best explains why sentences such as “It’s raining in Paris but I don’t believe it” and “It’s raining in Paris but I don’t know it” appear odd to us. I argue that the rival rational credibility account of assertion explains that fact just as well. I do so by providing a broadly Bayesian analysis of the said type of sentences which shows that such sentences cannot express rationally held beliefs. (...)
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  4. Nancy Cartwright (2007). Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Hunting Causes and Using Them argues that causation is not one thing, as commonly assumed, but many. There is a huge variety of causal relations, each with different characterizing features, different methods for discovery and different uses to which it can be put. In this collection of new and previously published essays, Nancy Cartwright provides a critical survey of philosophical and economic literature on causality, with a special focus on the currently fashionable Bayes-nets and invariance methods – and it (...)
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  5. Ronald Pisaturo (2011). The Longevity Argument. self.score: 24.0
    J. Richard Gott III (1993) has used the “Copernican principle” to derive a probability density function for the total longevity of any phenomenon, based solely on the phenomenon’s past longevity. John Leslie (1996) and others have used an apparently similar probabilistic argument, the “Doomsday Argument,” to claim that conventional predictions of longevity must be adjusted, based on Bayes’ Theorem, in favor of shorter longevities. Here I show that Gott’s arguments are flawed and contradictory, but that one of his conclusions—his (...)
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  6. Frank van Dun, Bayesianism and Austrian Apriorism.score: 24.0
    In the last published round of his debate with Walter Block on economic methodology,1 Bryan Caplan introduces Bayes’ Rule as ‘a cure for methodological schizofrenia’. Block had raised the question ‘Why do economists react so violently to empirical evidence against the conventional view of the minimum wage’s effect?’ and answered it with the suggestion that economists do so because they are covert praxeologists. This means that they base most of their economic arguments on conclusions derived from their a priori (...)
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  7. Simon McNair & Aidan Feeney (2011). Norms and High-Level Cognition: Consequences, Trends, and Antidotes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):260-261.score: 24.0
    We are neither as pessimistic nor as optimistic as Elqayam & Evans (E&E). The consequences of normativism have not been uniformly disastrous, even among the examples they consider. However, normativism won't be going away any time soon and in the literature on causal Bayes nets new debates about normativism are emerging. Finally, we suggest that to concentrate on expert reasoners as an antidote to normativism may limit the contribution of research on thinking to basic psychological science.
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  8. Keith M. Parsons (2010). Rational Episodes: Logic for the Intermittently Reasonable. Prometheus Books.score: 24.0
    Preface for instructors -- Preface for students (you really should read it) -- What is logic about? -- Sentential logic basics -- Sentential logic proofs -- More sentential logic : contradictions, tautologies and assumptions -- Predicate logic basics -- Proofs in predicate logic -- Probability : the basic rules of life -- The theorem of Dr. Bayes -- Probability illusions : why we are so bad at inductive reasoning -- Studies have shown ... or have they? -- Inference to (...)
     
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  9. T. R. Addis & D. C. Gooding (2008). Simulation Methods for an Abductive System in Science. Foundations of Science 13 (1):37-52.score: 18.0
    We argue that abduction does not work in isolation from other inference mechanisms and illustrate this through an inference scheme designed to evaluate multiple hypotheses. We use game theory to relate the abductive system to actions that produce new information. To enable evaluation of the implications of this approach we have implemented the procedures used to calculate the impact of new information in a computer model. Experiments with this model display a number of features of collective belief-revision leading to consensus-formation, (...)
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  10. Jeffrey Ketland (2009). Beth's Theorem and Deflationism — Reply to Bays. Mind 118 (472):1075-1079.score: 14.0
    Is the restricted, consistent, version of the T-scheme sufficient for an ‘implicit definition’ of truth? In a sense, the answer is yes (Haack 1978 , Quine 1953 ). Section 4 of Ketland 1999 mentions this but gives a result saying that the T-scheme does not implicitly define truth in the stronger sense relevant for Beth’s Definability Theorem. This insinuates that the T-scheme fares worse than the compositional truth theory as an implicit definition. However, the insinuation is mistaken. For, as Bays (...)
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  11. Penelope Miller (2012). I Can't Read (Directions)! Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (3):1-21.score: 14.0
    “I can’t read. Show me” is a student’s cry heard by teachers of the arts in all kinds of classes. Demonstrating a particular process one on one is a very effective way to learn, but sometimes teachers need a way for students to take notes or follow a guide to aid in remembering a complex technique. Notation systems have developed as the educational solution to this need.1 Adela Bay, a private piano teacher, relates in her book’s dedication the reason she (...)
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  12. Jeremy Fernando (2013). Sitting in the Dock of the Bay, Watching …. Continent 3 (2):8-12.score: 14.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
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  13. Stephen T. Davis (1999). Is Belief in the Resurrection Rational? Philo 2 (1):51-61.score: 12.0
    This essay is a response to Michael Martin’s “Why the Resurrection Is Initially Improbable,” Philo, Vol. 1, No.1. I argue that Martin has not succeeded in achieving his aim of showing that the Resurrection is initially improbable and thus, by Bayes’s Theorem, implausible. I respond to five of Martin’s arguments: (1) the “particular time and place argument”; (2) the claim that there is no plausible Christian theory of why Jesus should have been incarnated and resurrected; (3) the claim that (...)
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  14. Brian Weatherson (2013). The Role of Naturalness in Lewis's Theory of Meaning. Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 1 (10).score: 10.0
    Many writers have held that in his later work, David Lewis adopted a theory of predicate meaning such that the meaning of a predicate is the most natural property that is (mostly) consistent with the way the predicate is used. That orthodox interpretation is shared by both supporters and critics of Lewis's theory of meaning, but it has recently been strongly criticised by Wolfgang Schwarz. In this paper, I accept many of Schwarze's criticisms of the orthodox interpretation, and add some (...)
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  15. Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.score: 8.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  16. Henrik Lübker (2012). The Method of In-Between in the Grotesque and the Works of Leif Lage. Continent 2 (3):170-181.score: 8.0
    “Artworks are not being but a process of becoming” —Theodor W. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory In the everyday use of the concept, saying that something is grotesque rarely implies anything other than saying that something is a bit outside of the normal structure of language or meaning – that something is a peculiarity. But in its historical use the concept has often had more far reaching connotations. In different phases of history the grotesque has manifested its forms as a means of (...)
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  17. David Prater (2013). Drift: A Way. Continent 3 (2):31-33.score: 8.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
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  18. M. T. Davis (2007). 'A Register of Vexations and Persecutions': Some Letters of Thomas Fyshe Palmer From Botany Bay During the 1790s. Enlightenment and Dissent 23:148-166.score: 8.0
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  19. T. Endicott (2009). Habeas Corpus and Guantanamo Bay: A View From Abroad. American Journal of Jurisprudence 54 (1):1-40.score: 8.0
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  20. Jamie Iredell (2011). Belief: An Essay. Continent 1 (4).score: 8.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 279—285. Concerning its Transitive Nature, the Conversion of Native Americans of Spanish Colonial California, Indoctrinated Catholicism, & the Creation There’s no direct archaeological evidence that Jesus ever existed. 1 I memorized the Act of Contrition. I don’t remember it now, except the beginning: Forgive me Father for I have sinned . . . This was in preparation for the Sacrament of Holy Reconciliation, where in a confessional I confessed my sins to Father Scott, who looked like Jesus, (...)
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  21. Bronwyn Lay (2013). Driftwood. Continent 3 (2):22-27.score: 8.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
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  22. Krzysztof Czerniawski (2010). Argument teoriomodelowy trzydzieści lat później. Filozofia Nauki 3.score: 8.0
    The paper aims at describing the discussion about the model-theorethic argument of Hilary Putnam in the past thirty years. First of all it presents the view of Timothy Bays, who through scrupulous examination of the formal side of the argument demonstrates that in fact it has very little in common with the model-theory. It is rather a simple and purely philosophical argument, which isn't more reliable and conclusive than any other argument in philosophy. Putnam tries to block the answer of (...)
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  23. L. Lambert, B. Queguiner, T. Labasque, A. Pichon & N. Lebreton (2002). Spatial Variability of Plankton Composition and Biomass on the Eastern Continental Shelf of the Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic Ocean). Continent. Shelf Res 22:1225-1247.score: 8.0
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  24. Timothy Bays (2009). Beth's Theorem and Deflationism. Mind 118 (472):1061-1073.score: 4.0
    In 1999, Jeffrey Ketland published a paper which posed a series of technical problems for deflationary theories of truth. Ketland argued that deflationism is incompatible with standard mathematical formalizations of truth, and he claimed that alternate deflationary formalizations are unable to explain some central uses of the truth predicate in mathematics. He also used Beth’s definability theorem to argue that, contrary to deflationists’ claims, the T-schema cannot provide an ‘implicit definition’ of truth. In this article, I want to challenge this (...)
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  25. Timothy Bays (2006). The Mathematics of Skolem's Paradox. In Dale Jacquette (ed.), Philosophy of Logic. North Holland. 615--648.score: 4.0
    Over the years, Skolem’s Paradox has generated a fairly steady stream of philosophical discussion; nonetheless, the overwhelming consensus among philosophers and logicians is that the paradox doesn’t constitute a mathematical problem (i.e., it doesn’t constitute a real contradiction). Further, there’s general agreement as to why the paradox doesn’t constitute a mathematical problem. By looking at the way firstorder structures interpret quantifiers—and, in particular, by looking at how this interpretation changes as we move from structure to structure—we can give a technically (...)
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  26. Timothy Bays (2000). The Fruits of Logicism. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 41 (4):415-421.score: 4.0
    You’ll be pleased to know that I don’t intend to use these remarks to comment on all of the papers presented at this conference. I won’t try to show that one paper was right about this topic, that another was wrong was about that topic, or that several of our conference participants were talking past one another. Nor will I try to adjudicate any of the discussions which took place in between our sessions. Instead, I’ll use these remarks to make (...)
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  27. Timothy Bays (2001). Partitioning Subsets of Stable Models. Journal of Symbolic Logic 66 (4):1899-1908.score: 4.0
    This paper discusses two combinatorial problems in stability theory. First we prove a partition result for subsets of stable models: for any A and B, we can partition A into |B |<κ(T ) pieces, Ai | i < |B |<κ(T ) , such that for each Ai there is a Bi ⊆ B where |Bi| < κ(T ) and Ai..
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