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Timothy Caulfield [25]T. Caulfield [2]
  1. Ubaka Ogbogu, Sarah Burningham, Adam Ollenberger, Kathryn Calder, Li Du, Khaled El Emam, Robyn Hyde-Lay, Rosario Isasi, Yann Joly, Ian Kerr, Bradley Malin, Michael McDonald, Steven Penney, Gayle Piat, Denis-Claude Roy, Jeremy Sugarman, Suzanne Vercauteren, Griet Verhenneman, Lori West & Timothy Caulfield (2014). Policy Recommendations for Addressing Privacy Challenges Associated with Cell-Based Research and Interventions. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):7.
    The increased use of human biological material for cell-based research and clinical interventions poses risks to the privacy of patients and donors, including the possibility of re-identification of individuals from anonymized cell lines and associated genetic data. These risks will increase as technologies and databases used for re-identification become affordable and more sophisticated. Policies that require ongoing linkage of cell lines to donors’ clinical information for research and regulatory purposes, and existing practices that limit research participants’ ability to control what (...)
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  2. Yasuko Takezawa, Kazuto Kato, Hiroki Oota, Timothy Caulfield, Akihiro Fujimoto, Shunwa Honda, Naoyuki Kamatani, Shoji Kawamura, Kohei Kawashima, Ryosuke Kimura, Hiromi Matsumae, Ayako Saito, Patrick E. Savage, Noriko Seguchi, Keiko Shimizu, Satoshi Terao, Yumi Yamaguchi-Kabata, Akira Yasukouchi, Minoru Yoneda & Katsushi Tokunaga (2014). Human Genetic Research, Race, Ethnicity and the Labeling of Populations: Recommendations Based on an Interdisciplinary Workshop in Japan. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):33.
    A challenge in human genome research is how to describe the populations being studied. The use of improper and/or imprecise terms has the potential to both generate and reinforce prejudices and to diminish the clinical value of the research. The issue of population descriptors has not attracted enough academic attention outside North America and Europe. In January 2012, we held a two-day workshop, the first of its kind in Japan, to engage in interdisciplinary dialogue between scholars in the humanities, social (...)
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  3. Zubin Master, Amy Zarzeczny, Christen Rachul & Timothy Caulfield (2013). What's Missing? Discussing Stem Cell Translational Research in Educational Information on Stem Cell “Tourism”. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):254-268.
    Stem cell tourism is a growing industry in which patients pursue unproven stem cell therapies for a wide variety of illnesses and conditions. It is a challenging market to regulate due to a number of factors including its international, online, direct-to-consumer approach. Calls to provide education and information to patients, their families, physicians, and the general public about the risks associated with stem cell tourism are mounting. Initial studies examining the perceptions of patients who have pursued stem cell tourism indicate (...)
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  4. Timothy Caulfield (2012). Should We Call It Fraud? Hastings Center Report 42 (1).
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  5. Christen Rachul, Amy McGuire & Timothy Caulfield (2012). Public Perceptions and Biobanking: What Does the Research Really Say? Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 6 (1).
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  6. Timothy Caulfield (2011). That Personal TouchTo the EditorTo the EditorTo the EditorTo the EditorLeonard M. Fleck repliesErrata. Hastings Center Report 41 (3):4-4.
    To the Editor: Last year I sent a vial of my spit to a prominent direct-to-consumer genetic testing company. The company's Web site promised that, in return, I would get genetic risk information that would allow me to "make life-style choices" and "make more informed decisions" about my health—in other words, personalize my health behaviors and medical care.When the results arrived I found little that was helpful. There was lots of fun and interesting information. It was, after all, information about (...)
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  7. Timothy Caulfield (2011). That Personal Touch. Hastings Center Report 41 (3):4-4.
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  8. Zubin Master, Nola M. Ries & Timothy Caulfield (2011). Balancing Efficiency and the Protection of Research Participants: Canadian Allergy/Asthma Researchers' Perspectives on the Ethics Review of Multi-Site Health Research. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (5).
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  9. Timothy Caulfield (2010). Stem Cell Research and Economic Promises. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):303-313.
    In the context of stem cell research, the promise of economic growth has become a common policy argument for adoption of permissive policies and increased government funding. However, declarations of economic and commercial benefit, which can be found in policy reports, the scientific literature, public funding policies, and the popular press, have arguably created a great deal of expectation. Can stem cell research deliver on the economic promise? And what are the implications of this economic ethos for the researchers who (...)
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  10. Nola M. Ries, Jane LeGrandeur & Timothy Caulfield (2010). Handling Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Birth Cohort Studies Involving Genetic Research: Responses From Studies in Six Countries. BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):4.
    Research involving minors has been the subject of much ethical debate. The growing number of longitudinal, pediatric studies that involve genetic research present even more complex challenges to ensure appropriate protection of children and families as research participants. Long-term studies with a genetic component involve collection, retention and use of biological samples and personal information over many years. Cohort studies may be established to study specific conditions (e.g. autism, asthma) or may have a broad aim to research a range of (...)
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  11. Amy Zarzeczny & Timothy Caulfield (2010). Stem Cell Tourism and Doctors' Duties to Minors—A View From Canada. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):3-15.
    While the clinical promise of much stem cell research remains largely theoretical, patients are nonetheless pursuing unproven stem cell therapies in jurisdictions around the world?a phenomenon referred to as ?stem cell tourism.? These treatments are generally advertised on a direct-to-consumer basis via the Internet. Research shows portrayals of stem cell medicine on such websites are overly optimistic and the claims made are unsubstantiated by published evidence. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that parents are pursing these ?treatments? for their children, despite potential (...)
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  12. Alethea Adair, Robyn Hyde-Lay, Edna Einsiedel & Timothy Caulfield (2009). Technology Assessment and Resource Allocation for Predictive Genetic Testing: A Study of the Perspectives of Canadian Genetic Health Care Providers. BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):6-.
    BackgroundWith a growing number of genetic tests becoming available to the health and consumer markets, genetic health care providers in Canada are faced with the challenge of developing robust decision rules or guidelines to allocate a finite number of public resources. The objective of this study was to gain Canadian genetic health providers' perspectives on factors and criteria that influence and shape resource allocation decisions for publically funded predictive genetic testing in Canada.MethodsThe authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 senior lab (...)
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  13. Timothy Caulfield (2009). Direct-To-Consumer Genetics and Health Policy: A Worst-Case Scenario? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6):48-50.
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  14. Timothy Caulfield & Charles Weijer, Minimal Risk and Large-Scale Biobank and Cohort Research.
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  15. Timothy Caulfield & Simrat Harry (2008). Popular Representations of Race: The News Coverage of BiDil. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):485-490.
  16. Timothy Caulfield & Tania Bubela (2007). Why a Criminal Ban? Analyzing the Arguments Against Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Canadian Parliamentary Debate. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):51 – 61.
    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) remains a controversial technique, one that has elicited a variety of regulatory responses throughout the world. On March 29, 2005, Canada's Assisted Human Reproduction Act came into force. This law prohibits a number of research activities, including SCNT. Given the pluralistic nature of Canadian society, the creation of this law stands as an interesting case study of the policy-making process and how and why a liberal democracy ends up making the relatively rare decision to use (...)
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  17. T. Caulfield (2004). Law and Policy in the Era of Reproductive Genetics. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):414-417.
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  18. Timothy Caulfield, Trudo Lemmens, Douglas Kinsella & Michael McDonald (2004). Currents in Contemporary Ethics. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):365-368.
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  19. Shaun Pattinson & Timothy Caulfield (2004). Variations and Voids: The Regulation of Human Cloning Around the World. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 5 (1):1-8.
    Background No two countries have adopted identical regulatory measures on cloning. Understanding the complexity of these regulatory variations is essential. It highlights the challenges associated with the regulation of a controversial and rapidly evolving area of science and sheds light on a regulatory framework that can accommodate this reality. Methods Using the most reliable information available, we have performed a survey of the regulatory position of thirty countries around the world regarding the creation and use of cloned embryos (see Table (...)
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  20. T. Caulfield, T. Lemmens, D. Kinsella & M. McDonald (2003). Research Ethics and the Role of the Professional Bodies: A View From Canada. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics: A Journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):365-368.
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  21. Timothy Caulfield (2003). Human Cloning Laws, Human Dignity and the Poverty of the Policy Making Dialogue. BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-7.
    Background The regulation of human cloning continues to be a significant national and international policy issue. Despite years of intense academic and public debate, there is little clarity as to the philosophical foundations for many of the emerging policy choices. The notion of "human dignity" is commonly used to justify cloning laws. The basis for this justification is that reproductive human cloning necessarily infringes notions of human dignity. Discussion The author critiques one of the most commonly used ethical justifications for (...)
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  22. Timothy Caulfield, Ross Upshur & Abdallah Daar (2003). DNA Databanks and Consent: A Suggested Policy Option Involving an Authorization Model. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-4.
    Background Genetic databases are becoming increasingly common as a means of determining the relationship between lifestyle, environmental exposures and genetic diseases. These databases rely on large numbers of research subjects contributing their genetic material to successfully explore the genetic basis of disease. However, as all possible research questions that can be posed of the data are unknown, an unresolved ethical issue is the status of informed consent for future research uses of genetic material. Discussion In this paper, we discuss the (...)
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  23. Lorraine Sheremeta, R. Gold & Timothy Caulfield (2003). Harmonizing Commercialization and Gene Patent Policy with Other Social Goals. In Bartha Maria Knoppers (ed.), Populations and Genetics: Legal and Socio-Ethical Perspectives. Martinus Nijhoff. 423--452.
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  24. Timothy Caulfield & Glenn Griener (2002). Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Research: Addressing the Issue of Physician Remuneration. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):305-308.
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  25. Susan Sherwin, Françoise Baylis, Alan Bernstein, Timothy Caulfield, Bernard Dickens, Jocelyn Downie, Bartha Knoppers, Thérèse Leroux, Neil MacDonald, Michael McDonald, Janet Storch & Charles Weijer, Integrating Bioethics and Health Law Into the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
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  26. Bartha Maria Knoppers, Timothy Caulfield & T. Douglas Kinsella (1998). Book Reviews-Legal Rights and Human Genetic Material. Bioethics-Oxford 12 (4):343.
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  27. Timothy Caulfield (1997). Glenn McGee, The Perfect Baby: A Pragmatic Approach to Genetics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (5):352-354.
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