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Thierry Chaminade [6]T. Chaminade [1]
  1. Thierry Chaminade, Jennifer L. Marchant, James Kilner & Christopher D. Frith (2012). An fMRI Study of Joint Action–Varying Levels of Cooperation Correlates with Activity in Control Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
    As social agents, humans continuously interact with with the people around them. Here, motor cooperation was investigated by designing a situation in which pairs of participants, one being scanned with fMRI, controlled jointly a visually presented object with joystick movements. The object oscillated dynamically along two dimensions, shades of pink and width of gratings, corresponding to the two cardinal directions of joystick movements. While the overall control of each participant on the object was kept constant, the amount of cooperation along (...)
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  2. Thierry Chaminade, Delphine Rosset, David Da Fonseca, Bruno Nazarian, Ewald Lutcher, Gordon Cheng & Christine Deruelle (2012). How Do We Think Machines Think? An fMRI Study of Alleged Competition with an Artificial Intelligence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
    Humans are particularly skilled in mentalizing, the inference of other agents’ hidden mental states. Here we question whether activity in brain areas involved in mentalizing is specific to the processing of mental states or can be generalized to the inference of non-mental states by investigating brain responses during the interaction with an artificial agent. Participants were scanned using fMRI during interactive rock-paper-scissors games while believing the opponent was a fellow human (Intentional agent), a humanoid robot endowed with an algorithm developed (...)
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  3. Ayse Pinar Saygin, Thierry Chaminade & Hiroshi Ishiguro (2010). The Perception of Humans and Robots: Uncanny Hills in Parietal Cortex. In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  4. Ludovic Marin, Johann Issartel & Thierry Chaminade (2009). Interpersonal Motor Coordination: From Humanhuman to Humanrobot Interactions. Interaction Studies 10 (3):479-504.
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  5. Thierry Chaminade & Jessica K. Hodgins (2006). Artificial Agents in Social Cognitive Sciences. Interaction Studies 7 (3):347-353.
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  6. J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of the (...)
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  7. Thierry Chaminade & Jean Decety (2001). A Common Framework for Perception and Action: Neuroimaging Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):879-882.
    In recent years, neurophysiological evidence has accumulated in favor of a common coding between perception and execution of action. We review findings from recent neuroimaging experiments in the action domain with three complementary perspectives: perception of action, covert action triggered by perception, and reproduction of perceived action (imitation). All studies point to the parietal cortex as a key region for body movement representation, both observed and performed.
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