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Profile: Timothy Chappell (Open University (UK))
  1. T. D. J. Chappell (ed.) (2009). The Problem of Moral Demandingness: New Philosophical Essays. Palgrave Macmillan.
  2. T. D. J. Chappell (2006). Reading the O: Theaetetus 170c-171c. Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 51 (2):109-139.
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  3. T. D. J. Chappell (ed.) (2006). Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    After 25 centuries, Aristotle's influence on our society's moral thinking remains profound and he continues to be a very important contributor to contemporary debates in philosophical ethics. This collection showcases some of the best new writing on the Aristotelian notion of virtue of character, which remains central to much of the most interesting work in ethical theory.
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  4. T. D. J. Chappell (2004/2005). Reading Plato's Theaetetus. Hackett Pub. Co..
    Timothy Chappell’s new translation of the Theaetetus is presented here in short sections of text, each preceded by a summary of the argument and followed by his philosophical commentary on it. Introductory remarks discuss Plato and his works, his use of dialogue, the structure of the Theaetetus, and alternative interpretations of the work as a whole. A glossary and bibliography are provided.
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  5. T. D. J. Chappell (2004). Persons as Goods: Response to Patrick Lee. Christian Bioethics 10 (1):69-78.
    Developing a British perspective on the abortion debate, I take up some ideas from Patrick Lee's fine paper, and pursue, in particular, the idea of individual humans as goods in themselves. I argue that this notion helps us to avoid the familiar mistake of making moral value impersonal. It also shows us the way out of consequentialism. Since the most philosophically viable notion of the person, the individual human, is (as Lee argues) a notion of an individual substance that is (...)
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  6. David S. Oderberg & T. D. J. Chappell (eds.) (2004). Human Values: New Essays on Ethics and Natural Law. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In recent decades, the revival of natural law theory in modern moral philosophy has been an exciting and important development. Human Values brings together an international group of moral philosophers who in various respects share the aims and ideals of natural law ethics. In their diverse ways, these authors make distinctive and original contributions to the continuing project of developing natural law ethics as a comprehensive treatment of modern ethical theory and practice.
     
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  7. T. D. J. Chappell (2003). Dominion. Ratio 16 (3):307–317.
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  8. T. D. J. Chappell (2003). Persons in Time: Metaphysics and Ethics. In Heather Dyke (ed.), Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers 189--207.
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  9. T. D. J. Chappell (2001). Understanding Human Goods. Mind 110 (437):196-199.
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  10. Piers Benn & T. D. J. Chappell (2000). Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):410-412.
    In this engaged and engaging survey Piers Benn examines the major currents of ethical theory, concentrating on sound reasoning about morality. Benn's account offers a qualified defence of Aristotelian virtue theory, while bringing out what is distinctive and valuable in a broad range of approaches, such as those of Kant and the Utilitarians. His examples emphasize the ordinary choices of everyday life - gossip, friendship, honesty, sexual relations, work, and self-realization.
     
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  11. T. D. J. Chappell (2000). Thrasymachus and Definition. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 18:101-7.
     
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  12. T. D. J. Chappell (1998). EJ Bond Ethics and Human Well-Being. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15:114-115.
     
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  13. T. D. J. Chappell (1998). The Incompleat Projectivist: How to Be an Objectivist and an Attitudinist. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (190):50-66.
    What is at stake in the dispute between moral objectivism and subjectivism is how we are to give a rational grounding to ethical first principles or basic commitments. The search is for an explanation of what if anything makes any commitments good. Subjectivisms such as Blackburn's quasi‐realism can give any set of commitments no ‘rational grounding’ in this sense except in considerations about internal consistency. But this is inadequate. Internal consistency is not sufficient for ethical rationality, since a set of (...)
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  14. T. D. J. Chappell (1998). Understanding Human Goods a Theory of Ethics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  15. T. D. J. Chappell (1997). The Philosophy of the Environment. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  16. T. D. J. Chappell (1996). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 105 (417):219-222.
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  17. T. D. J. Chappell (1996). The Plato Reader. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  18. T. D. J. Chappell (1995). Aristotle and Augustine on Freedom: Two Theories of Freedom, Voluntary Action, and Akrasia. St. Martin's Press.
  19. T. D. J. Chappell (1995). Does Protagoras Refute Himself? Classical Quarterly 45 (02):333-.
    Protagoras believes that all beliefs are true. Since Protagoras' belief that all beliefs are true is itself a belief, it follows from Protagoras' belief that all beliefs are true that Protagoras' belief is true. But what about the belief that Protagoras' belief is false? Doesn't it follow, by parallel reasoning and not at all trivially, that if all beliefs are true and there is a belief that Protagoras' belief is false, then Protagoras' belief is false?
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  20. T. D. J. Chappell (1995). Book Reviews : The Question of Christian Ethics by Ralph McInerny. Washington: Catholic University of America Press (London: Eurospan). 1993. 74pp. Pb. 9.95. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 8 (1):128-131.
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  21. T. D. J. Chappell (1995). Reason, Passion, and Action: The Third Condition of the Voluntary. Philosophy 70 (273):453 - 459.
    1. ‘Reason is and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can pretend to no other office, but to serve and obey them.’ 2.3.3) Unfortunately, Hume uses ‘reason’ to mean ‘discovery of truth or falsehood‘ as well as discovery of logical relations. So suppose we avoid, as Hume I think does not, prejudging the question of how many ingredients are requisite for action, by separating these two claims out: A. Reason is and ought only to be the (...)
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  22. T. D. J. Chappell (1993). Biomedical politics. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):54-55.
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  23. T. D. J. Chappell (1993). Why God Is Not a Consequentialist. Religious Studies 29 (2):239 - 243.
    Can there be a moral philosophy which combines Christianity and consequentialism? John Stuart Mill himself claimed that these positions were, at the least, not mutually exclusive, and quite possibly even congenial to one another; and some recent work by Christian philosophers in America has resurrected this claim. But there is a simple argument to show that consequentialism and orthodox Christianity are not so much as jointly assertible.
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  24. T. D. J. Chappell (1993). Why God is Not a Consequentialist: T. D. J. CHAPPELL. Religious Studies 29 (2):239-243.
    Can there be a moral philosophy which combines Christianity and consequentialism? John Stuart Mill himself claimed that these positions were, at the least, not mutually exclusive, and quite possibly even congenial to one another; and some recent work by Christian philosophers in America has resurrected this claim. But there is a simple argument to show that consequentialism and orthodox Christianity are not so much as jointly assertible.
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  25. T. D. J. Chappell, Robert Wardy, Robert Heinaman, Katerina Ierodiakonou, Richard Gaskin, Richard J. Ketchum, Justin Gosling, Bob Sharples & M. R. Wright (1993). Brill Online Books and Journals. Phronesis 38 (1).
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