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  1. T. H. Irwin & Practical Reason Divided (forthcoming). Disunity in Aristotelian Virtues: A Reply to Richard Kraut. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy.
     
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  2. T. H. Irwin (2015). II—Nil Admirari? Uses and Abuses of Admiration. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):223-248.
    Both Plato and Aristotle have something to say about admiration. But in order to know where to look, and in order to appreciate the force of their remarks, we need to sketch a little of the ethical background that they presuppose. I begin, therefore, with ancient Greek ethics in the wider sense, and discuss the treatment of admiration and related attitudes by Homer, Herodotus, and other pre-Platonic sources. Then I turn to the views of Plato, Adam Smith, Aristotle and Cicero. (...)
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  3. T. H. Irwin (2015). Shaftesbury’s Place in the History of Moral Realism. Philosophical Studies 172 (4):865-882.
    Whewell and ShaftesburyIn contemporary moral philosophy ‘moral realism’ refers to a position in the metaphysics of morality that is analogous to realism about ordinary objects, and to scientific realism about theoretical entities. It is a realist doctrine in contrast to non-cognitivism, constructivism, fictionalism, and nihilism about moral judgments and moral properties. But while these particular contrasts are characteristic of contemporary philosophy, realism itself is much older. Ross, Prichard, and Sidgwick, for instance, hold realist views in the metaphysics of morals, though (...)
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  4. T. H. Irwin (2013). Later Christian Ethics. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  5. T. H. Irwin (2013). Nature, Law, and Natural Law. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press 206.
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  6. T. H. Irwin (2011). Continuity in the History of Autonomy. Inquiry 54 (5):442 - 459.
    Abstract Six apparent features of Kant's conception of autonomy appear to differentiate it sharply from anything that we can find in an Aristotelian conception of will and practical reason. (1) Autonomy requires a role for practical reason independent of its instrumental role in relation to non-rational desires. (2) This role belongs to the rational will. (3) This role consists in the rational will's being guided by its own law. (4) This guidance by the law of the will itself requires acts (...)
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  7. T. H. Irwin (2011). From Essence to Form: Meta Physics 1029b1-14 (in That Order). In Enrico Berti & Carlo Natali (eds.), Aristotle: Metaphysics and Practical Philosophy: Essays in Honour of Enrico Berti. Peeters
     
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  8. T. H. Irwin (2011). Mistakes About Good: Prichard, Carritt, and Aristotle. In Thomas Hurka (ed.), Underivative Duty: British Moral Philosophers From Sidgwick to Ewing. OUP Oxford
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  9. T. H. Irwin (2010). Green, Bradley and Sidgwick. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge
  10. T. H. Irwin (2010). Review of J.B. Schneewind, Essays on the History of Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  11. T. H. Irwin (2008). Scotus and the Possibility of Moral Motivation. In Paul Bloomfield (ed.), Morality and Self-Interest. Oxford University Press
     
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  12. T. H. Irwin (2008). The Platonic Corpus. In Gail Fine (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press 63--87.
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  13. T. H. Irwin (2008). The Threefold Cord: Reconciling Strategies in Moral Theory. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1part2):121-133.
    Eighteenth-century disputes in moral theory seem to offer an opportunity to scepticism about moral theory and about morality. Twentieth-century theorists have tried to forestall a sceptical argument from disagreement in moral theory to doubts about morality, by appeal to a division between first-order and second-order questions. This division, however, does not answer the sceptical argument. A better reply appears in Butler's treatment of disagreement through his strategies of consensus and comprehension. These strategies are illustrated by his discussion of utilitarianism and (...)
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  14. T. H. Irwin (2007). A 'Fundamental Misunderstanding'? Utilitas 19 (1):78-90.
    One of the many illuminating aspects of Bart Schultz's book is the recurrent theme of Sidgwick's Socratic inspiration. Some of Sidgwick's contemporaries at Cambridge were among those who gave new life to the study of Socrates and Plato in England. The Cambridge Apostles were self-consciously devoted both to Socratic ideals of friendship and to the Socratic aim of impartial free inquiry on fundamental questions.
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  15. T. H. Irwin (2006). Aquinas, Natural Law, and Aristotelian Eudaimonism. In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Blackwell Pub. 323--341.
  16. T. H. Irwin (2006). Aristotle's Use of Prudential Concepts. In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Mcdowell and His Critics. Blackwell Pub. 6--180.
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  17. T. H. Irwin (2006). Green's Criticism of the British Moralists. In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press
     
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  18. T. H. Irwin (2005). Do Virtues Conflict? Aquinas's Answer. In Stephen Mark Gardiner (ed.), Virtue Ethics, Old and New. Cornell University Press
     
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  19. T. H. Irwin (2004). Aristotle on Meaning and Essence. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):95-105.
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  20. T. H. Irwin (2004). Nicholas White, Individual and Conflict in Greek Ethics:Individual and Conflict in Greek Ethics. Ethics 114 (4):848-858.
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  21. T. H. Irwin (2003). Augustine's Criticisms of the Stoic Theory of Passions. Faith and Philosophy 20 (4):430-447.
    Augustine defends three claims about the passions: (1) The Stoic position differs only verbally from the Platonic-Aristotelian position. (2) The Stoic positionis wrong and the Platonic-Aristotelian position is right. (3) The will is engaged in the different passions; indeed the different passions are different expressionsof the will. The first two claims, properly understood, are defensible. But the most plausible versions of them give us good reason to doubt the third claim.
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  22. T. H. Irwin (2003). Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (367-323 BC). In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub. 56.
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  23. T. H. Irwin (2001). The Theory of Forms. Filozofski Vestnik 22 (1):55-81.
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  24. T. H. Irwin (1999). Republic II: Objections to Justice. In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 2: Ethics, Politics, Religion, and the Soul. OUP Oxford
     
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  25. T. H. Irwin (1999). Splendid Vices? Augustine For and Against Pagan Virtues. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (2):105-127.
    Augustine is notorious for his claim that the so-called virtues of pagans are not genuine virtues at all. Bayle refers to this claim when he describes the sort of virtue that one ought to be willing to attribute to atheists.
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  26. J. L. Ackrill, Julia Annas, M. F. Burnyeat, John M. Cooper, Marcia L. Homiak, Rosalind Hursthouse, T. H. Irwin, L. A. Kosman, Richard Kraut, John McDowell, Alfred R. Mele & Martha C. Nussbaum (1998). Aristotle's Ethics: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The ethics of Aristotle , and virtue ethics in general, have enjoyed a resurgence of interest over the past few decades. Aristotelian themes, with such issues as the importance of friendship and emotions in a good life, the role of moral perception in wise choice, the nature of happiness and its constitution, moral education and habituation, are finding an important place in contemporary moral debates. Taken together, the essays in this volume provide a close analysis of central arguments in Aristotle's (...)
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  27. T. H. Irwin (1998). Ancient Views. The Virtues: Theory and Common Sense in Greek Philosophy. In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should One Live?: Essays on the Virtues. Clarendon Press
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  28. T. H. Irwin (1998). Common Sense and Socratic Method. In Jyl Gentzler (ed.), Method in Ancient Philosophy. Clarendon Press
     
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  29. T. H. Irwin (1998). Mill and the Classical World. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Mill. Cambridge University Press 423--463.
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  30. T. H. Irwin (1997). Aristotelian Substances and Stoic Subjects. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 51 (201):397-415.
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  31. T. H. Irwin (1997). Practical Reason Divided. In Garrett Cullity & Berys Nigel Gaut (eds.), Ethics and Practical Reason. Oxford University Press 189--214.
     
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  32. Gail Fine, Francisco J. Gonzalez, Verity Harte, Tim O'Keefe, Tad Brennan, T. H. Irwin & Bob Sharples (1996). Brill Online Books and Journals. Phronesis 41 (3).
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  33. T. H. Irwin (1996). Review: Art and Philosophy in Plato's "Dialogues". [REVIEW] Phronesis 41 (3):335 - 350.
  34. T. H. Irwin (1996). Stoic Individuals. Philosophical Perspectives 10:459 - 480.
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  35. T. H. Irwin (1995). Prudence and Morality in Greek Ethics. Ethics 105 (2):284-295.
    Focuses on the traditional view of Greek ethics. Response to articles by Julia Annas and Nicholas White about the interpretation of Greek ethics; Plato's concept of happiness based on his book `Republic'; Issues about prudential and moral reasoning.
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  36. T. H. Irwin (1994). Bernard Williams, Shame and Necessity. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1993. Pp. Xii+ 254. Apeiron 27 (1):45-76.
     
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  37. T. H. Irwin (1994). Critical Notice of Bernard Williams, Shame and Necessity. Apeiron 27 (1):45-76.
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  38. T. H. Irwin (1994). Review: Critical Notice. [REVIEW] Apeiron 27 (1):45 - 76.
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  39. T. H. Irwin (1994). Review: Happiness, Virtue, and Morality. [REVIEW] Ethics 105 (1):153 - 177.
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  40. T. H. Irwin (1994). Happiness, Virtue, and Morality:The Morality of Happiness. Julia Annas. Ethics 105 (1):153-.
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  41. T. H. Irwin (1993). Ethics with Aristotle by Sarah Broadie. Journal of Philosophy 90 (6):323-329.
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  42. T. H. Irwin (1993). Say What You Believe. Apeiron 26 (3/4):1 - 16.
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  43. T. H. Irwin (1992). Plato: The Intellectual Background. In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge University Press 51--89.
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  44. T. H. Irwin (1992). Socratic Puzzles,”. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 10:241-66.
     
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  45. T. H. Irwin (1992). Socratic Puzzles: A Review of Gregory Vlastos: Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher. [REVIEW] In Julia Annas (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Volume X: 1992. Clarendon Press
     
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  46. T. H. Irwin (1992). Who Discovered the Will? Philosophical Perspectives 6:453-473.
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  47. T. H. Irwin (1991). Aristippus Against Happiness. The Monist 74 (1):55-82.
  48. T. H. Irwin (1991). Review: The Structure of Aristotelian Happiness. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (2):382 - 391.
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  49. T. H. Irwin (1991). The Structure of Aristotelian Happiness:Aristotle on the Human Good. Richard Kraut. Ethics 101 (2):382-.
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