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  1. T. M. Rudavsky (2010). The Art of Dialogue in Jewish Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 97-99.
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  2. T. M. Rudavsky (2008). Interpreting Maimonides. Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):241 - 244.
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  3. T. M. Rudavsky (2005). A Re-Examination of Henry of Ghent's Criticisms in Light of His Predecessors. Modern Schoolman 82 (2):101-109.
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  4. T. M. Rudavsky (2003). Cecilia Trifogli, Oxford Physics in the Thirteenth Century (Ca. 1250–1270): Motion, Infinity, Place and Time. (Studien Und Texte Zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters, 72.) Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 2000. Pp. Vii, 289. $95. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (2):616-617.
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  5. T. M. Rudavsky (2003). Howard Kreisel, Prophecy: The History of an Idea in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. (Amsterdam Studies in Jewish Thought, 8.) Dordrecht, Boston, and London: Kluwer, 2001. Pp. Xi, 669; 1 Chart. $200. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (3):928-930.
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  6. T. M. Rudavsky (2002). Chris Schabel, Theology at Paris, 1316–1345: Peter Auriol and the Problem of Divine Foreknowledge and Future Contingents.(Ashgate Studies in Medieval Philosophy.) Aldershot, Eng., and Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate, 2000. Pp. Xi, 368; Black-and-White Frontispiece. $89.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (4):1390-1392.
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  7. T. M. Rudavsky (1997). Creation and Temporality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Faith and Philosophy 14 (4):458-477.
    Of the many philosophical perplexities facing medieval Jewish thinkers, perhaps none has been as challenging or as divisive as determining whether the universe is created or eternal. Not unlike contemporary cosmologists who worry about the first instant of creation of the universe, or Christian scholastics who attempted to define the nature of an instant, so too medieval Jewish thinkers were aware of the philosophical complexities surrounding the issues of creation and time. Jews were immensely affected by Scripture and in particular (...)
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  8. T. M. Rudavsky (1997). Philosophical Cosmology in Judaism. Early Science and Medicine 2 (2):149-184.
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  9. T. M. Rudavsky (1994). Interpreting Maimonides: Studies in Methodology, Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy. Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):241-244.
  10. T. M. Rudavsky (1987). Introduction to the Principle of Individuation in the Early Middle Ages. Review of Metaphysics 40 (3):574-575.
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  11. T. M. Rudavsky (1982). Individuals and the Doctrine of Individuation in Gersonides. New Scholasticism 56 (1):30-50.
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  12. T. M. Rudavsky (1978). Conflicting Motifs in Ibn Gabirol's Discussion of Matter and Evil. New Scholasticism 52 (1):54-71.
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