Search results for 'T. M. Scanlon Jr' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  96
    Ralph Wedgwood (2016). Review of Being Realistic About Reasons, by T. M. Scanlon. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 66 (262):213-217.
    This is a review of T. M. Scanlon's book "Being Realistic about Reasons", which is based on the Locke Lectures that Scanlon gave in Oxford in 2009.
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  2. Jussi Suikkanen (2011). Intentions, Blame, and Contractualism: A Review of T.M. Scanlon, Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 2 (2):561-573.
    This is a longer critical notice of T.M. Scanlon's book Moral Dimensions. The main crux of the article is to investigate how Scanlon's claims about the moral significance of intentions and reactive attitudes in this book fit with the earlier contractualist ethical theory which he presented in What We Owe to Each Other.
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  3. Jussi Suikkanen (2007). Review of T. M. Scanlon's What We Owe to Each Other. [REVIEW] Utilitas 19 (4):524-526.
    This paper is a short review of T.M. Scanlon's book What We Owe to Each Other. The book itself is already a philosophical classic. It defends a contractualist ethical theory but also has many interesting things to say about reasons, value, well-being, promises, relativism, and so on.
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  4. R. Jay Wallace, Rahul Kumar & Samuel Freeman (eds.) (2011). Reasons and Recognition: Essays on the Philosophy of T.M. Scanlon. Oxford University Press Usa.
    For close to forty years now T.M. Scanlon has been one of the most important contributors to moral and political philosophy in the Anglo-American world. Through both his writing and his teaching, he has played a central role in shaping the questions with which research in moral and political philosophy now grapples. Reasons and Recognition brings together fourteen new papers on an array of topics from the many areas to which Scanlon has made path-breaking contributions, each of which (...)
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  5.  2
    T. M. Scanlon (2000). I–T. M. Scanlon. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301-317.
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  6.  66
    R. Jay Wallace, Rahul Kumar & Samuel Richard Freeman (eds.) (2011). Reasons and Recognition: Essays on the Philosophy of T. M. Scanlon. Oxford University Press.
    Reasons and Recognition brings together fourteen new papers on an array of topics from the many areas to which Scanlon has made path-breaking contributions, ...
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  7.  9
    A. W. Price, Review of T.M. Scanlon, 'Being Realistic About Reasons'. [REVIEW]
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  8. Mark Schroeder (2014). Being Realistic About Reasons, by T.M. Scanlon. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):195-198.
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  9. S. Matthew Liao, What We Owe to Each Other by T. M. Scanlon.
    Scanlon’s book aims to offer us a moral theory of right and wrong and of our obligations to one another. The theory is called contractualism and its central claim is that an act is right or wrong if and only if it could or could not be justified to others on grounds that they could not reasonably reject (p. 4). Scanlon recognizes that so stated, his contractualism might seem empty in the sense that one might think that the (...)
     
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  10.  9
    A. W. Price (2016). Being Realistic About Reasons, by T. M. Scanlon. Mind 125 (500):1270-1273.
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  11.  26
    Laura Schroeter & François Schroeter (2015). Review: T. M. Scanlon, Being Realistic About Reasons. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (4):1225-1230.
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  12. Robert Merrihew Adams (2001). Scanlon's Contractualism: Critical Notice of T. M. Scanlon, "What We Owe to Each Other". Philosophical Review 110 (4):563-586.
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  13.  18
    James Lenman (2016). Being Realistic About Reasons, T. M. Scanlon. Oxford University Press, 2014, Vii +132 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 32 (1):143-149.
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  14.  47
    Travis Rieder (2010). T. M. Scanlon, Moral Dimensions: Meaning, Permissibility and Blame. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):529-533.
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  15.  53
    David Copp & David Sobel (2000). What We Owe to Each Other, T. M. Scanlon, the Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1998, IX + 420 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):333-378.
  16.  7
    John Skorupski (2015). Being Realistic About Reasons, by T. M. Scanlon. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, Vii + 132 Pp. ISBN: 978-0-19-967848-8 Hb £18.99. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 23:e8-e12.
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  17.  15
    Anton Markoč (2013). Reasons and Recognition: Essays on the Philosophy of T. M. Scanlon, Edited by R. Jay Wallace, Rahul Kumar, and Samuel Freeman. [REVIEW] Mind 122 (488):1208-1213.
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  18.  38
    David Sosa (2004). A Big, Good Thing: T.M. Scanlon, What We Owe to Each Other (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998). Noûs 38 (2):359–377.
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  19.  5
    Review by: Laura Schroeter and François Schroeter (2015). Review: T. M. Scanlon, Being Realistic About Reasons. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (4):1225-1230,.
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  20.  22
    Nicholas Southwood (2005). The Difficulty of Tolerance, by T. M. Scanlon. Cambridge University Press, 2003, IX + 273 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 21 (2):326-333.
  21.  15
    David Sosa (2004). T.M. Scanlon, What We Owe to Each Other (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998) A Big, Good Thing. Noûs 38 (2):359-377.
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  22.  14
    Paul Weithman (2004). T. M. Scanlon, The Difficulty of Tolerance:The Difficulty of Tolerance. Ethics 114 (4):836-842.
  23.  3
    Martin O'Neill (2013). Symposium on the Political Philosophy of T. M. Scanlon Introduction. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):371-374.
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  24. Robert Merrihew Adams (2001). Scanlon's Contractualism: Critical Notice of T. M. Scanlon, "What We Owe to Each Other". Philosophical Review 110 (4):563.
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  25.  14
    Laura Schroeter & François Schroeter (2015). Scanlon, T. M.Being Realistic About Reasons.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. 132. $29.92. Ethics 125 (4):1225-1230.
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  26.  2
    Oliver James Keenan Op (2016). Dynamics of Difference: Christianity and Alterity. A Festschrift for Werner G. Jeanrond Edited by Ulrich Schmiedel and James M. Matarazzo Jr., Bloomsbury T&T Clark, London, 2015, Pp. XV + 310, £80.00, Hbk. [REVIEW] New Blackfriars 97 (1070):514-517.
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  27.  19
    D. S. Colman (1948). School Books Alston Hurd Chase and Henry Phillips Jr.: A New Introduction to Greek. Pp. 128. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1946. Paper, 10s. F. Kinchin Smith and T. W. Melluish: Teach Yourself Greek. Pp. 331. London: Hodder and Stoughton (for the English Universities Press), 1947. Cloth, 4s. 6d. K. C. Masterman: A Latin Word-List. Pp. 3. Melbourne: Macmillan, 1945. Paper, 2s. 6d. K. D. Robinson and R. L. Chambers: The Latin Way. Pp. Xxviii+380 (Many Drawings by Hilary M. Crosse). London: Christophers, 1947. Cloth, 6s. 6d. O. N. Jones: Faciliora Reddenda. Pp. 96. London and Glasgow: Blackie, 1947. Cloth, 2s. I. Williamson: The Friday Afternoon Latin Book. Pp. 79 (Illustrated by Drawings). London and Glasgow: Blackie, 1947. Cloth, 2s. 3d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 62 (3-4):158-159.
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  28.  16
    Erica K. Rangel (2008). Innovation and the Pharmaceutical Industry: Critical Reflections on the Vitures of Profit , H.T. Engelhardt, Jr. And J.R. Garrett (Eds.) (Salem: M & M Scrivener Press, 2008). [REVIEW] HEC Forum 20 (4):375-378.
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  29.  4
    Maria Letizia Zanier (2001). P.M. Sniderman, P. Peri, R.J.P. De Figueiredo, Jr. E T. Piazza, "The Outsider". Polis 15 (1):158-160.
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  30. Helen Adolf (1960). Chrétien, Troyes, and the Grail. Urban T. Holmes, Jr., M. Amelia Klenke. Speculum 35 (4):607-611.
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  31. A. K. Choudhury (1968). Mott Thomas H. Jr., Determination of the Ir Redundant Normal Forms of a Truth Function by Iterated Consensus of the Prime Implicants. IRE Transactions on Electronic Computers, Vol. EC-9 , Pp. 245–252.Chang D. M. Y. And Mott T. H. Jr., Computing Irredundant Normal Forms From Abbreviated Presence Functions. IEEE Transactions on Electronic Computers, Vol. EC-14 , Pp. 335–342. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (4):541-542.
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  32. Carina Fourie (2012). What is Social Equality? An Analysis of Status Equality as a Strongly Egalitarian Ideal. Res Publica 18 (2):107-126.
    What kind of equality should we value and why? Current debate centres around whether distributive equality is valuable. However, it is not the only (potentially) morally significant form of equality. David Miller and T. M. Scanlon have emphasised the importance of social equality—a strongly egalitarian notion distinct from distributive equality, and which cannot be reduced to a concern for overall welfare or the welfare of the worst-off. However, as debate tends to focus on distribution, social equality has been neglected (...)
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  33.  9
    Nathan Stout (forthcoming). Salience, Imagination, and Moral Luck. Philosophical Papers.
    In this paper, I begin by addressing the way in which T.M. Scanlon's account of blame aims to solve the problem of moral luck by appealing to the significance of an agent’s actions. I then attempt to show that this solution to the problem fails in an important way insofar as there may be cases of outcome luck in which one’s being a member of a particular relationship with normative standards is itself a matter of luck. After presenting this (...)
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  34. Hannah Altehenger, Simon Gaus & Andreas Leonhard Menges (2015). Being Realistic About Reflective Equilibrium. Analysis 75 (3):514-522.
    In Being Realistic About Reasons,T.M. Scanlon develops a non-naturalistic realist account of normative reasons. A crucial part of that account is Scanlon’s contention that there is no deep epistemological problem for non-naturalistic realists, and that the method of reflective equilibrium suffices to explain the possibility of normative knowledge. In this critical notice we argue that this is not so: on a realist picture, normative knowledge presupposes a significant correlation between distinct entities, namely between normative beliefs and normative facts. (...)
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  35.  16
    Elizabeth Finneron-Burns (2016). Contractualism and the Non-Identity Problem. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1151-1163.
    This paper argues that T.M. Scanlon’s contractualism can provide a solution to the non-identity problem. It first argues that there is no reason not to include future people in the realm of those to whom we owe justification, but that merely possible people are not included. It then goes on to argue that a person could reasonably reject a principle that left them with a barely worth living life even though that principle caused them to exist, and that current (...)
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  36.  40
    Hon-Lam Li (2015). Contractualism and Punishment. Criminal Justice Ethics 34 (2):177-209.
    T. M. Scanlon’s contractualism is a meta-ethical theory that explains moral motivation and also provides a conception of how to carry out moral deliberation. It supports non-consequentialism – the theory that both consequences and deontological considerations are morally significant in moral deliberation. Regarding the issue of punishment, non-consequentialism allows us to take account of the need for deterrence as well as principles of fairness, justice, and even desert. Moreover, Scanlonian contractualism accounts for permissibility in terms of justifiability: An act (...)
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  37.  44
    Michael Cholbi (2014). Luck, Blame, and Desert. Philosophical Studies 169 (2):313-332.
    T.M. Scanlon has recently proposed what I term a ‘double attitude’ account of blame, wherein blame is the revision of one’s attitudes in light of another person’s conduct, conduct that we believe reveals that the individual lacks the normative attitudes we judge essential to our relationship with her. Scanlon proposes that this account justifies differences in blame that in turn reflect differences in outcome luck. Here I argue that although the double attitude account can justify blame’s being sensitive (...)
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  38. S. Matthew Liao (2010). The Buck-Passing Account of Value: Lessons From Crisp. Philosophical Studies 151 (3):421 - 432.
    T. M. Scanlon's buck-passing account of value (BPA) has been subjected to a barrage of criticisms. Recently, to be helpful to BPA, Roger Crisp has suggested that a number of these criticisms can be met if one makes some revisions to BPA. In this paper, I argue that if advocates of the buck-passing account accepted these revisions, they would effectively be giving up the buck-passing account as it is typically understood, that is, as an account concerned with the conceptual (...)
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  39. Hon-Lam Li (2013). Engelhardt on the Family. International Journal of Chinese and Comparative Philosophy of Medicine (153-160).
    Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. offers erudite and compelling arguments for the view that all families should try to realize the traditional family. Although I tend to agree with him from my personal standpoint, I doubt that this view can be justified to those with whom we are in reasonable disagreement about the family. I make three critical points. First, though Engelhardt stops short of saying that the state should encourage people to form traditonal families, or discourage those who do not, some (...)
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  40. Hon-Lam Li (2013). Engelhardt on the Family. International Journal of Chinese and Comparative Philosophy of Medicine (153-160).
    Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. offers erudite and compelling arguments for the view that all families should try to realize the traditional family. Although I tend to agree with him from my personal standpoint, I doubt that this view can be justified to those with whom we are in reasonable disagreement about the family. I make three critical points. First, though Engelhardt stops short of saying that the state should encourage people to form traditonal families, or discourage those who do not, some (...)
     
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  41. Michael Otsuka (2000). Scanlon and the Claims of the Many Versus the One. Analysis 60 (3):288–293.
    In "What We Owe to Each Other", T. M. Scanlon argues that one should save the greater number when faced with the choice between saving one life and two or more different lives. It is, Scanlon claims, a virtue of this argument that it does not appeal to the claims of groups of individuals but only to the claims of individuals. I demonstrate that this argument for saving the greater number, indeed, depends, contrary to what Scanlon says, (...)
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  42. T. M. Scanlon Jr (1986). Equality of Resources and Equality of Welfare: A Forced Marriage? Ethics 97 (1):111-118.
  43. Pamela Hieronymi (2011). Of Metaethics and Motivation: The Appeal of Contractualism. In R. Jay Wallace, Rahul Kumar & Samuel Richard Freeman (eds.), Reasons and Recognition: Essays on the Philosophy of T. M. Scanlon. Oxford University Press
    In 1982, when T. M. Scanlon published “Contractualism and Utilitarianism,” he noted that, despite the widespread attention to Rawls’ A Theory of Justice, the appeal of contractualism as a moral theory had been under appreciated. In particular, the appeal of contractualism’s account of what he then called “moral motivation” had been under appreciated.1 It seems to me that, in the intervening quarter century, despite the widespread discussion of Scanlon’s work, the appeal of contractualism, in precisely this regard, has (...)
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  44. Margaret Gilbert, Andrew Mason, Elizabeth S. Anderson, J. David Velleman, Matthew H. Kramer, Michele M. Moody‐Adams & Martha C. Nussbaum (1999). 10. Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy (Pp. 454-456). Ethics 109 (2).
     
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  45.  43
    Noell Birondo (2016). Review of Robert N. Johnson and Michael Smith (Eds.), Passions & Projections: Themes From the Philosophy of Simon Blackburn. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly:00-00.
    Simon Blackburn has not shied away from the use of vivid imagery in developing, over a long and prolific career, a large-scale philosophical vision. Here one might think, for instance, of ‘Practical Tortoise Raising’ or ‘Ramsey's Ladder’ or ‘Frege's Abyss’. Blackburn develops a ‘quasi-realist’ account of many of our philosophical and everyday commitments, both theoretical (e.g., modality and causation) and practical (e.g., moral judgement and normative reasons). Quasi-realism aims to provide a naturalistic treatment of its targeted phenomena while earning the (...)
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  46.  44
    S. Matthew Liao (2012). Intentions and Moral Permissibility: The Case of Acting Permissibly with Bad Intentions. Law and Philosophy 31 (6):703-724.
    Many people believe in the intention principle, according to which an agent’s intention in performing an act can sometimes make an act that would otherwise have been permissible impermissible, other things being equal. Judith Jarvis Thomson, Frances Kamm and Thomas Scanlon have offered cases that seem to show that it can be permissible for an agent to act even when the agent has bad intentions. If valid, these cases would seem to cast doubt on the intention principle. In this (...)
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  47.  2
    R. M. Byrn (1978). The Antelope. By John T. Noonan, Jr. Berkeley: University of California Press. American Journal of Jurisprudence 23 (1):237-242.
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  48. George T. Dennis (1985). Walter Emil Kaegi Jr., Byzantine Military Unrest, 471–843: An Interpretation. Amsterdam: Adolf M. Hakkert, 1981. Paper. Pp. Xii, 373. [REVIEW] Speculum 60 (1):164-165.
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  49. T. M. P. Mahadevan & Hywel David Lewis (eds.) (1976). Philosophy, East and West: Essays in Honour of Dr. T. M. P. Mahadevan. Blackie & Son (India).
    Bhattacharyya, K. The Advaita concept of subjectivity.--Deutsch, E. Reflections on some aspects of the theory of rasa.--Nakamura, H. The dawn of modern thought in the East.--Organ, T. Causality, Indian and Greek.--Chatterjee, M. On types of classification.--Lacombe, O. Transcendental imagination.--Bahm, A. J. Standards for comparative philosophy.--Herring, H. Appearance, its significance and meaning in the history of philosophy.--Chang Chung-yuan. Pre-rational harmony in Heidegger's essential thinking and Chʼan thought.--Staal, J. F. Making sense of the Buddhist tetralemma.--Enomiya-Lassalle, H. M. The mysticism of Carl Albrecht (...)
     
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  50.  91
    T. M. Scanlon, The Diversity of Objections to Inequality.
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 1996, given by T.M. Scanlon, an American philosopher.
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