Search results for 'T. S. Palys' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  13
    P. L. S. (1934). S. T. Coleridge's Treatise on Method as Published in the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 31 (19):528-529.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  72
    Dominic Griffiths (2015). The Poet as ‘Worldmaker’: T.S. Eliot and the Religious Imagination. In Francesca Knox & David Lonsdale (eds.), The Power of the Word: Poetry and the Religious Imagination. Ashgate 161-175.
    Martin Heidegger defines the world as ‘the ever non-objective to which we are subject as long as the paths of birth and death . . . keep us transported into Being’. He writes that the world is ‘not the mere collection of the countable or uncountable, familiar and unfamiliar things that are at hand . . . The world worlds’. Being able to fully and richly express how the world worlds is the task of the artist, whose artwork is the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  47
    Dominic Griffiths (2014). Looking Into the Heart of Light: Considering the Poetic Event in the Work of T.S. Eliot and Martin Heidegger. Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):350-367.
    No one is quite sure what happened to T.S. Eliot in that rose-garden. What we do know is that it formed the basis for Four Quartets, arguably the greatest English poem written in the twentieth century. Luckily it turns out that Martin Heidegger, when not pondering the meaning of being, spent a great deal of time thinking and writing about the kind of event that Eliot experienced. This essay explores how Heidegger developed the concept of Ereignis, “event” which, in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Dominic Heath Griffiths (2012). 'A Raid on the Inarticulate': Exploring Authenticity, Ereignis and Dwelling in Martin Heidegger and T.S. Eliot. Dissertation, University of Auckland
    This thesis explores, thematically and chronologically, the substantial concordance between the work of Martin Heidegger and T.S. Eliot. The introduction traces Eliot's ideas of the 'objective correlative' and 'situatedness' to a familiarity with German Idealism. Heidegger shared this familiarity, suggesting a reason for the similarity of their thought. Chapter one explores the 'authenticity' developed in Being and Time, as well as associated themes like temporality, the 'they' (Das Man), inauthenticity, idle talk and angst, and applies them to interpreting Eliot's poem, (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Gregory S. Jay & T. S. Eliot (1983). T.S. Eliot and the Poetics of Literary History.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Russell Kirk (1971). Eliot and His Age T. S. Eliot's Moral Imagination in the Twentieth Century. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. William H. Quillian (1983). Hamlet and the New Poetic James Joyce and T.S. Eliot.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Martin Warner (1999). A Philosophical Study of T.S. Eliot's Four Quartets. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  21
    Ming Hsiung (2009). Jump Liars and Jourdain's Card Via the Relativized T-Scheme. Studia Logica 91 (2):239 - 271.
    A relativized version of Tarski’s T-scheme is introduced as a new principle of the truth predicate. Under the relativized T-scheme, the paradoxical objects, such as the Liar sentence and Jourdain’s card sequence, are found to have certain relative contradictoriness. That is, they are contradictory only in some frames in the sense that any valuation admissible for them in these frames will lead to a contradiction. It is proved that for any positive integer n , the n -jump liar sentence is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  11
    A. Beckmann & A. Weiermann (2000). Analyzing Godel's T Via Expanded Head Reduction Trees. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 46 (4):517-536.
    Inspired from Buchholz' ordinal analysis of ID1 and Beckmann's analysis of the simple typed λ-calculus we classify the derivation lengths for Gödel's system T in the λ-formulation.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. T. S. Champlin (1977). Self-Deception: A Reflexive Dilemma: T. S. Champlin. Philosophy 52 (201):281-299.
    It is not easy to see how self-deception is possible because the man who deceives himself seems to be required to play two incompatible roles, that of deceiver and that of deceived. This makes self-deception sound about as difficult as presiding at one's own funeral. Many attempts have been made to remove the air of paradox from self-deception. These attempts are all unsuccessful, and they are best seen as expressions of philosophical puzzlement rather than as actual solutions. In particular, the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  10
    Manju Jain (1992/2004). T.S. Eliot and American Philosophy: The Harvard Years. Cambridge University Press.
    Manju Jain's innovative study of T. S. Eliot 's Harvard years traces the genesis of his major literary, religious and intellectual preoccupations in his early work as a student of philosophy, and explores its influence on his poetic and critical practice. His concerns were located within the mainstream of Harvard philosophical debates, especially in relation to the controversy of science versus religion. These questions point forward to important debates in contemporary philosophy and hermeneutics. Drawing extensively on unpublished sources, Manju Jain (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  19
    Prajna Pani (2013). Reflections on the Existential Philosophy in T.S. Eliot's Poetry. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):301-316.
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The paper examines a ground that the chosen philosophers share. It will address man’s existential crisis - his confusion and despair over his existence. T. S Eliot believed that his insight could pull humanity out of the despair (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  5
    T. S. Champlin (1993). A Curious Plural: T. S. Champlin. Philosophy 68 (266):435-455.
    Statements of identity with a plural subject, of the form ‘They are the same person ,’ as illustrated in each of the answers to the above two questions, give rise to a philosophical problem.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  21
    Carlos João Correia (2001). A Terra Desolada: A Experiência Do Mal Em T. S. Eliot. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 57 (3):575-591.
    O presente artigo tem como objectivo fundamental propor uma interpretação do poema de T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land, no qual a experiência do mal constitui ponto de referência central. Esta experiência, traduzida metaforicamente por "terra desolada", pode ser perspectivada tanto em termos pessoais como civilizacionais. O poema, depois de realizar o diagnóstico de uma situação de crise profunda, realiza o que poderíamos designar como um ritual catártico que permite a purificação das dimensões negativas, sedimentadas em nós, constrangedoras da nossa liberdade. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Pablo Luis Zambrano Carballo (2011). Cultura, religión y humanismo en el pensamiento de T. S. Eliot. Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 28:191-211.
    El pensamiento sociocultural del influyente poeta y crítico T. S. Eliot es la parte de su obra que menos atención crítica ha merecido pero que, al mismo tiempo, más ha influido en las últimas décadas en el progresivo desprestigio que, desde presupuestos ideológicos, ha sufrido el conjunto de su legado. Sin obviar sus muchos elementos discutibles, muy polémicos ya desde su formulación a partir de la tercera década del siglo pasado e incluso desfasados desde la perspectiva actual, este artículo revisa (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  4
    Andrew Stables (2008). Can ‘Sensibility’ Be Re-‘Associated’? Reflections on T.S. Eliot and the Possibility of Educating for a Sustainable Environment. Ethics and Education 3 (2):161-170.
    The paper considers T.S. Eliot's 'dissociation of sensibility' thesis, considering its philosophical value and attempting to defend it against published objections. While accepting some of the criticisms, it is argued that Eliot's argument is sound to a significant extent. Eliot's account retains explanatory power with regard to an enduring arts-science divide in schooling and, more broadly, in environmental ethics. In both these areas, educators can, and should, find greater synergies between arts and science, and theoria and praxis, despite continuing pressures (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Tim Bruno (2013). Buddhist Conceptual Rhyming and T.S.Eliot's Crisis of Connection in TheWaste Land and 'Burnt Norton'. Asian Philosophy 23 (4):365 - 378.
    In this essay, I elaborate a reading of the Buddhist allusions throughout T.S. Eliot's poetry as being not confessions of Buddhist faith or merely syncretic experiments, but rather ?conceptual rhymes? with the crisis of personal connection that preoccupies Eliot across multiple texts. In the Buddhist concepts of prat?tya-samutp?da, ??nyat?, sa?s?ra, and the pretas, Eliot finds thematic resonances with his own emotional and psychological concerns and so alludes to these concepts in ?The Fire Sermon? section of The Waste Land and ?Burnt (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  18
    Rafey Habib (1999). The Early T.S. Eliot and Western Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Rafey Habib's book offers a comprehensive study of Eliot's philosophical writings and attempts to assess their impact on both his early poetry through 'The Waste Land' and the central concepts of his literary criticsm. Habib presents the first scholalrly analysis of Eliot's difficult unpublished papers on Kant and Bergson and establishes the nature of Eliot's connections with major figures in the Western philosophical tradition, including Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Hume, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Bradley and Russell. The Early T. S. Eliot and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Jeroen Vanheste (2007). Guardians of the Humanist Legacy: The Classicism of T.S. Eliot's Criterion Network and its Relevance to Our Postmodern World. Brill.
    The T.S. Eliot of the 1920s was a European humanist who was part of an international network of like-minded intellectuals. Their ideas about literature, education and European culture in general remain highly relevant to the cultural debates of our day.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Aakanksha Virkar-Yates (2016). An Objective Chemistry: What T. S. Eliot Borrowed From Schopenhauer. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):527-537.
    In his 1926 lectures on metaphysical poetry, T. S. Eliot describes the work of Jules Laforgue as the “nearest verse equivalent to the philosophies of Schopenhauer and Hartmann,” a literary rendition of their philosophies of the unconscious and of annihilation.1 Yet, Eliot suggests, in Laforgue the system of Schopenhauer ultimately collapses; the poet does not find in the philosopher that metaphysical balance between thought and feeling he so desperately craves. Schopenhauer’s philosophy, Eliot asserts, is “muddled by feeling—for what is more (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Uri Zoller, J. Ebenezer, K. Morely, S. Paras, V. Sandberg, C. West, T. Wolthers & S. H. Tan (1990). Goal Attainment in Science‐Technology‐Society (S/T/S) Education and Reality: The Case of British Columbia. Science Education 74 (1):19-36.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  16
    David E. Packham (2003). G.A.T.S. And Universities: Implications for Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (1):85-100.
    The likely impact of applying the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) to higher education are examined. GATS aims to “open up” services to competition: no preference can be shown to national or government providers. The consequences for teaching are likely to be that private companies, with degree-awarding powers, would be eligible for the same subsidies as public providers. Appealing to the inadequate recently introduced “benchmark” statements as proof of quality, they would provide a “bare bones” service at lower (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  24. Greg Ray (2006). Tarski's Grelling and the T-Strategy. In Bryson Brown (ed.), Truth and Probability: Essays in Honour of Hugues Leblanc. College Publications
    Tarski's argumentative use of the liar paradox is well-known, but officially it is the Grelling paradox that has final pride of place in Tarski's argument, not the Liar at all. Tarski explicitly gives argumentation that adverts to the liar argument, but it is an alternative argument—one he only hints at and which adverts to the Grelling—which he says has the advantage of removing any empirical element. In this paper, we will examine how the Grelling might be used in place of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Anna Pietryga (2007). Tarski's T-Scheme as an Alleged Basis of Montague Semantics. Logic and Logical Philosophy 15 (4):369-379.
    My point in this paper is to focus on some details of Alfred Tarski’s writing that in my opinion have not been aptly represented — or aptly rejected — in Richard Montague’s grammar and to agree with those who share Tarski’s view that human language is something uncapturable. The paper consists of two parts, concerning 1) some attempts to formalize the non-declarative utterances, and 2) the limitations of T-scheme and of Montague grammar.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. S. Andrew Schroeder (2011). You Don't Have to Do What's Best! (A Problem for Consequentialists and Other Teleologists). In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, vol. 1. Oxford University Press
    Define teleology as the view that requirements hold in virtue of facts about value or goodness. Teleological views are quite popular, and in fact some philosophers (e.g. Dreier, Smith) argue that all (plausible) moral theories can be understood teleologically. I argue, however, that certain well-known cases show that the teleologist must at minimum assume that there are certain facts that an agent ought to know, and that this means that requirements can't, in general, hold in virtue of facts about value (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Robert Northcott & A. Alexandrova (2015). Prisoner's Dilemma Doesn't Explain Much. In Martin Peterson (ed.), The Prisoner’s Dilemma. Cambridge 64-84.
    We make the case that the Prisoner’s Dilemma, notwithstanding its fame and the quantity of intellectual resources devoted to it, has largely failed to explain any phenomena of social scientific or biological interest. In the heart of the paper we examine in detail a famous purported example of Prisoner’s Dilemma empirical success, namely Axelrod’s analysis of WWI trench warfare, and argue that this success is greatly overstated. Further, we explain why this negative verdict is likely true generally and not just (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  19
    Mary K. Hendrickson, Harvey S. James & William D. Heffernan (2008). Does the World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don't? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):311-328.
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  14
    Mats Bergman (2007). Development, Purpose, and the Spectre of Anthropomorphism: Sundry Comments on T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4):601 - 609.
    T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs offers a strong interpretation of semeiotic, advocating a developmental and naturalistic position. This commentary examines some of the main features of Short's approach, raising a number of critical questions concerning the growth of Peirce's thought and the problem of anthropomorphism. First, two possible weaknesses in Short's account of the development of semeiotic, connected to the treatment of the "New List of Categories" and the role of the index, are noted. Next, the menace of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  19
    Mats Bergman (2007). Development, Purpose, and the Spectre of Anthropomorphism: Sundry Comments on T. L. Short's. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4).
    : T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs offers a strong interpretation of semeiotic, advocating a developmental and naturalistic position. This commentary examines some of the main features of Short's approach, raising a number of critical questions concerning the growth of Peirce's thought and the problem of anthropomorphism. First, two possible weaknesses in Short's account of the development of semeiotic, connected to the treatment of the "New List of Categories" and the role of the index, are noted. Next, the menace (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  11
    T. K. Abbott (1887). Lexicons to the Greek Testament A Greek English Lexicon of the New Testament, Being Grimm's Wilke's Clavis Novi Testamenti. Translated, Revised and Enlarged by Joseph Henry Thayer, D.D., Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation in the Divinity School of Harvard University. Edinburgh, T. And T. Clark. 1886. 4to. Pp. 726. 36s. Biblico Theological Lexicon to New Testament Greek. By Hermann Cremer, D.D., Professor of Theology in the University of Greifswald. Third English Edition. With Supplement. Translated From the Latest German Edition by William Uewick, M.A. Edinburgh, T. And T. Clark. 1886. 4to. Pp. 943. 38s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (04):106-109.
    A Greek English Lexicon of the New Testament, being Grimm's Wilke's Clavis Novi Testamenti. Translated, Revised and Enlarged by Joseph Henry Thayer, D.D., Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation in the Divinity School of Harvard University. Edinburgh, T. and T. Clark. 1886. 4to. pp. 726. 36s.Biblico Theological Lexicon to New Testament Greek. by Hermann Cremer, D.D., Professor of Theology in the University of Greifswald. Third English Edition. With Supplement. Translated from the latest German Edition by William Uewick, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  14
    James Jakób Liszka (2007). Teleology and Semiosis: Commentary on T. L. Short's. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4).
    : According to T.L. Short, Peirce's early thought-sign account of semeiotic engenders fatal flaws. On the one hand, it entails an infinite regressus of representation that cannot feasibly explain the connection between signs and objects and, on the other, an infinite progressus, leaving Peirce's theory without the wherewithal to account for the sign's meaning and significance. According to Short, Peirce overcomes the first flaw through the robust development of the notion of the index and the concept of collateral experience. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  8
    K. Hendrickson Mary, S. James Harvey & D. Heffernan William (2008). Does the World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don't? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4).
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  5
    G. Eliot, T. S. Eliot, W. Empsom, M. Ernst, M. C. Escher, B. Flanagan, H. Focillon, F. M. Ford, A. Fowler & F. J. Haydn (2009). Gunpowder Plot, 7 Hampshire, S., 79-80 Handel, GF, 137 Hardy, T., 18 Hare, RM, X, Xii, 24. In John Hawthorne (ed.), Ethics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. 81.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Suzanne Smith (2010). Elias Canetti and T. S. Eliot on Fame. Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 145-160.
    "Fame," observes Elias Canetti, "wants to hang from the stars because they are so far removed . . ."1 What the seeker after fame finds attractive in the prospect of hanging from the stars are the conditions of distance and elevation, which promise security in the form of detachment and abstraction from the world below. We find in Canetti's image of the fame-seeking sensibility not two conflicting desires (for the renown conferred upon successful risk-takers and the safety secured through (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Alexander Sarch (2011). Internalism About a Person's Good: Don't Believe It. Philosophical Studies 154 (2):161-184.
    Internalism about a person's good is roughly the view that in order for something to intrinsically enhance a person's well-being, that person must be capable of caring about that thing. I argue in this paper that internalism about a person's good should not be believed. Though many philosophers accept the view, Connie Rosati provides the most comprehensive case in favor of it. Her defense of the view consists mainly in offering five independent arguments to think that at least some form (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37.  77
    J. Kevin O'Regan & Ned Block (2012). Discussion of J. Kevin O'Regan's “Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness”. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):89-108.
    Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness” Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s13164-012-0090-7 Authors J. Kevin O’Regan, Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS - Université Paris Descartes, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères, 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France Ned Block, Departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA Journal Review of Philosophy and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38.  42
    John Perry (2008). Can't We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer's My Way. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157 - 166.
    My aim in this study is not to praise Fischer's fine theory of moral responsibility, but to (try to) bury the "semi" in "semicompatibilism". I think Fischer gives the Consequence Argument (CA) too much credit, and gives himself too little credit. In his book, The Metaphysics of Free Will, Fischer gave the CA as good a statement as it will ever get, and put his finger on what is wrong with it. Then he declared stalemate rather than victory. In my (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  39.  26
    Zenon Pylyshyn, S Eeingand Visualizing: I T' S N Otwhaty Ou T Hink.
    6. Seeing With the Mind’s Eye 1: The Puzzle of Mental Imagery .................................................6-1 6.1 What is the puzzle about mental imagery?..............................................................................6-1 6.2 Content, form and substance of representations ......................................................................6-6 6.3 What is responsible for the pattern of results obtained in imagery studies?.................................6-8..
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  9
    S. J. Barth (1962). T. S. Eliot's Image of Man. Renascence 14 (3):126-138.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Zenon Pylyshyn, Se E I N G a N D V I S U a L I Z I N G : I T ' S N O T W H a T y O U T H I N K'.
    6. Seeing With the Mind ’ s Eye 1 : The Puzzle of Mental Imagery 6. 1 What is the puzzle about mental imagery? 6. 2 Content, form and substance of representations 6. 3 What is responsible for the pattern of results obtained in imagery studies?
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  19
    Felix Joachimski & Ralph Matthes (2003). Short Proofs of Normalization for the Simply- Typed Λ-Calculus, Permutative Conversions and Gödel's T. Archive for Mathematical Logic 42 (1):59-87.
    Inductive characterizations of the sets of terms, the subset of strongly normalizing terms and normal forms are studied in order to reprove weak and strong normalization for the simply-typed λ-calculus and for an extension by sum types with permutative conversions. The analogous treatment of a new system with generalized applications inspired by generalized elimination rules in natural deduction, advocated by von Plato, shows the flexibility of the approach which does not use the strong computability/candidate style à la Tait and Girard. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  43. Bradley Monton (2011). Mixed Strategies Can't Evade Pascal's Wager. Analysis 71 (4):642-645.
    I defend Pascal's Wager from a particular way of evading it, the mixed strategy approach. The mixed strategies approach suggests that Pascal's Wager does not obligate one to believe in God, because one can get the same infinite expected utility from other strategies besides the strategy of believing in God. I will show that while there's nothing technically wrong with the mixed strategy approach, rationality requires it to be applied in such a way that Pascal's (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44.  5
    Karen T. Romer (1972). T. S. Eliot and the Language of Liturgy. Renascence 24 (3):119-135.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Cheung Chan-fai (1998). T'ang Chün-I's Philosophy of Love. Philosophy East and West 48 (2):257-271.
    T'ang Chün-i's early work Ai-ching chih fu-yin (Gospel of love) has been much neglected by T'ang scholars. This essay argues that this text is not a caprice, and that it marks an important stage in T'ang's life and studies. Furthermore, in the history of Chinese philosophy, it is probably the first book ever written on the philosophy of love.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46. David Papineau (2003). Why You Don’T Want to Get in the Box with Schrödinger's Cat. Analysis 63 (277):51–58.
    By way of an example, Lewis imagines your being invited to join Schrödinger’s cat in its box for an hour. This box will either fill up with deadly poison fumes or not, depending on whether or not some radioactive atom decays, the probability of decay within an hour being 50%. The invitation is accompanied with some further incentive to comply (Lewis sets it up so there is a significant chance of some pretty bad but not life-threatening punishment if you don’t (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  47.  1
    John Guillory (1983). The Ideology of Canon-Formation: T. S. Eliot and Cleanth Brooks. Critical Inquiry 10 (1):173-198.
    Nostalgia is only the beginning of a recognizably ideological discourse. The way through to the ideological sense of Tennyson’s “failure,” beneath the phenomenal glow of Eliot’s nostalgia, lies in the entanglement of minority in this complex of meanings, the determination that Tennyson is properly placed when seen as a “minor Virgil.” The diffusion of a major talent in minor works suggests that what Tennyson or Eliot might have been was another Virgil, and for Eliot that means simply a “classic.” In (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Andreas Weiermann (1998). How is It That Infinitary Methods Can Be Applied to Finitary Mathematics? Gödel's T: A Case Study. Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (4):1348-1370.
    Inspired by Pohlers' local predicativity approach to Pure Proof Theory and Howard's ordinal analysis of bar recursion of type zero we present a short, technically smooth and constructive strong normalization proof for Gödel's system T of primitive recursive functionals of finite types by constructing an ε 0 -recursive function [] 0 : T → ω so that a reduces to b implies [a] $_0 > [b]_0$ . The construction of [] 0 is based on a careful analysis of the Howard-Schütte (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  40
    John Corcoran (forthcoming). Tarski’s Convention T: Condition Beta. SOUTH AMERICAN JOURNAL OF LOGIC 1 (1).
    Tarski’s Convention T—presenting his notion of adequate definition of truth (sic)—contains two conditions: alpha and beta. Alpha requires that all instances of a certain T Schema be provable. Beta requires in effect the provability of ‘every truth is a sentence’. Beta formally recognizes the fact, repeatedly emphasized by Tarski, that sentences (devoid of free variable occurrences)—as opposed to pre-sentences (having free occurrences of variables)—exhaust the range of significance of is true. In Tarski’s preferred usage, it is part of the meaning (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Christopher Gauker (2001). T-Schema Deflationism Versus Gödel’s First Incompleteness Theorem. Analysis 61 (270):129–136.
    I define T-schema deflationism as the thesis that a theory of truth for our language can simply take the form of certain instances of Tarski's schema (T). I show that any effective enumeration of these instances will yield as a dividend an effective enumeration of all truths of our language. But that contradicts Gödel's First Incompleteness Theorem. So the instances of (T) constituting the T-Schema deflationist's theory of truth are not effectively enumerable, which casts doubt on the idea that the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000