Search results for 'TTP' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Miklós Vassányi (2009). The Philosophical Foundation of Religious Toleration in Spinoza (TTP), Bayle (Commentaire Philosophique) and Locke (Epistola de Tolerantia). Bijdragen 70 (4):408-422.score: 15.0
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  2. Edwin Curley (1990). Homo Audax. Leibniz, Oldenburg and the TTP. Studia Leibnitiana 27:277-312.score: 15.0
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  3. Walter Lapini (2010). Una citazione da San Paolo (epistola ai Romani 1.13) Nel tractatus theologico-politicus di Spinoza (ttp 11.5). Giornale di Metafisica 32 (1):159-164.score: 15.0
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  4. Bopobckoro Pefl, Omuepa Oaecca & Thfi Eh Occchkc (1996). E. Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (TTP) 7. CnHHO3a B. BOPOCJIOBCKO-nojTHTHHCCKHH rpaKTar, Co; Iep> Kamnfi HecKOjibKO paccyacfleHHH, noKasbisaiomHx, HTO (J) Hjioco (J) CTBOBaHHa M05KCT 6biTb flonymeHa HC TOjibKO Ges GjiaronecTHK) H cnoKOHCTBHio rocyaapcTBa, HO HTO Ona TOjibKO Co. [REVIEW] Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 12:235.score: 15.0
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  5. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2012). “’Christus Secundum Spiritum’: Spinoza, Jesus, and the Infinite Intellect”. In Neta Stahl (ed.), The Jewish Jesus. Routledge.score: 6.0
  6. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2010). The Metaphysics of Spinoza's Theological Political Treatise. In Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), Spinoza's Theological Political Treatise: A Critical Guide. Cambridge.score: 6.0
  7. Eric Schliesser, Spinoza and the Philosophy of Science: Mathematics, Motion, and Being.score: 3.0
    This chapter argues that the standard conception of Spinoza as a fellow-travelling mechanical philosopher and proto-scientific naturalist is misleading. It argues, first, that Spinozas account (...)
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  8. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2012). Spinoza's Deification of Existence. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:75-104.score: 3.0
    The aim of this paper is to clarify Spinozas views on some of the most fundamental issues of his metaphysics: the nature of Gods attributes, the (...) nature of existence and eternity, and the relation between essence and existence in God. While there is an extensive literature on each of these topics, it seems that the following question was hardly raised so far: What is, for Spinoza, the relation between Gods existence and the divine attributes? Given Spinozas claims that there are intimate connections between Gods essence and his existence – “Gods essence and his existence are one and the same”(E1p20) – and between Gods essence and the attributes – “By attribute I understand what the intellect perceives of substance, as constituting its essence” (E1d4), we would naturally expect that by transitivity, there is a significant relation between Gods existence and the attributes. Yet, as far as I know, there is little, if any, attempt in the existing literature to explicate such a relation, and it is one of my aims of this study to both raise the question and answer it. Eventually, I will argue that for Spinoza God is nothing but existence, and that the divine attributes are just fundamental kinds of existence, or, what is the same, as I will later argue, the intellects most fundamental and adequate conceptions of existence. In the first part of the paper I provide some background for Spinozas brief discussion in the TTP of Gods name and essence by studying the claims of Maimonides in the Guide of the Perplexed that Gods true essence is necessary existence, and that this essence is denoted by the ineffable Hebrew name of God, the Tetragrammaton (YHVH). In the second part of the paper I point out similar claims Spinoza presents in the TTP, and show how they respond to and echo Maimonidesdiscussion in the Guide. In the third part, I examine Spinozas apparently conflicting claims in the Ethics about the relationship between Gods essence and existence. In some places Spinoza claims that Gods essence and existence are strictly identical (E1p10: “Gods essence his existence are one and the same”), but in other passages he makes the apparently much more modest claim that Gods essence involves existence (E1d1, E1p7d and E1p11d), which may lead one to believe that there is more to Gods essence than mere existence. I show that Spinozas understanding of the relation denoted by the Latininvolvitis consistent with the strict identification of essence and existence in God, and that Spinoza identifies Gods essence with self-necessitated existence, or eternity. Indeed, Spinozas understanding of eternity [aeternitas] as self-necessitated existence (E1d8) is one of the very few Spinozistic concepts that has no trace in Descartes. In this part I will also solve the long-standing problem of the sense in which the infinite modes can be calledeternal.’ In the fourth part I turn to the relation between the divine attributes and Gods existence and argue that, for Spinoza, the attributes are self-sufficient and adequate conceptions of existence. Finally, I will attempt to explain what brought Spinoza to deify existence. -/- Part I: “In that Day shall God be One, and his Name One”- Maimonides on Gods Name and Essence. -/- 1.1 Before we delve into the texts, let me suggest a few distinctions between various views on the issue of the relation between essence and existence in God. The view I suspect both Maimonides and Spinoza subscribe to can be termed the divine essence-existence Identity Thesis. -/- Identity Thesis (IT): Gods essence is existence and nothing but existence. We should distinguish the Identity Thesis from the much more common view according to which Gods essence contains existence, or (which I take to be roughly the same) that existence is one of the properties or perfections which constitute Gods essence. The latter view allows for the possibility (though it does not demand) that there is more to Gods essence than bare existence (e.g., Gods essence may include omniscience, omnipotence, etc.). I will term this view the divine essence-existence Containment Thesis. (shrink)
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  9. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). Spinozas Respublica Divina:” in Otfried Höffe (Ed.), Baruch de Spinozas Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (Berlin: Akademie Verlag (Klassiker Aulegen), Forthcoming). In Otfried Höffe (ed.), Baruch de Spinozas Tractatus theologico-politicus. Akademie Verlag (Klassiker Aulegen). 177-192.score: 3.0
    Chapters 17 and 18 of the TTP constitute a textual unit in which Spinoza submits the case of the ancient Hebrew state to close examination. This is (...)
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  10. Edward Halper (2004). Spinoza on the Political Value of Freedom of Religion. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (2):167-182.score: 3.0
    The last chapter of Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise (TTP) is a brief for freedom of religion. In our enthusiasm for Spinoza's conclusion it is easy to (...)
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  11. Graeme Hunter (2004). Radical Protestantism in Spinoza's Thought. Ashgate.score: 3.0
    Context -- A Jew in Amsterdam -- Conflicts and communities -- Christian philosophy? -- A Bible gallery -- Religion and politics in the TTP -- Miracles, meaning, and moderation -- Christian pluralism (...) -- Ethics reconsidered -- Providence, obedience, and love -- Spinoza and Christianity. (shrink)
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  12. C. M. Lorkowski (2009). The Miracle of Moses. Heythrop Journal 50 (2):181-188.score: 3.0
    In this paper, I draw out a tension between miracles, prophecy, and Spinozas assertions about Moses in the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP). The three seem to constitute (...) an inconsistent triad. Spinozas account of miracles requires a naturalistic interpretation of all events. This categorical claim must therefore apply to prophecy; specifically, Moseshearing Gods voice in a manner which does not seem to invoke the imagination or natural phenomena. Thus, Spinoza seemingly cannot maintain both Mosesexalted status and his account of miracles. I consider some possible solutions, but find that they are either untrue to Spinozas position, or would undercut his categorical argument against miracles. I therefore conclude that Spinoza leaves an unresolved tension in the TTP. (shrink)
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  13. Warren Zev Harvey (2012). Shlomo Pines on Maimonides, Spinoza, and Kant. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (2):173-182.score: 3.0
    In hisSpinozas TTP , Maimonides, and Kant” (1968), Pines compared Spinozas dogmas of universal faith ( TTP , 14) with Kants postulates of practical reason ( Critique (...) of Practical Reason , part 1). According to him, Spinozas dogmas, like Maimonides’ “necessary beliefs” ( Guide 3:28), are postulates necessary for political welfare, and do not fall under the jurisdiction of theoretical reason. They define the faith of the common person, not that of the philosopher. Kant, in his remarks about Spinoza as anupright skeptic,” mistakenly thought his dogmas were true beliefs, not necessary ones; and his notion of postulates of practical reason seems to have been in part influenced by his mistaken view of Spinozas dogmas. The transformation of Maimonides’ “necessary beliefsinto Kantspostulates of practical reason,” as narrated by Pines, recalls the similar transformation ofAverroismintoChristian Averroismin the thirteenth century. In essays written from the late 1970s until his death in 1990, Pines returned to the theme of Maimonides and Kant, and argued convincingly that Maimonidesepistemology wascriticalin the Kantian sense. However, his related argument that Maimonidesreligious sensibility was similar to Kants is less convincing. Unlike Kant, Maimonides did not think that critical epistemology made room for faith, but held that it caused one to tremble in awe. Like Spinoza, he identified true faith with intellectual knowledge, not something beyond it. His distinctiveness as a philosopher is that he was a God-intoxicated Knower like Spinoza, but a critical epistemologist like Kant. (shrink)
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  14. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (2010). The Politics of Spinoza's Vanishing Dichotomies. Political Theory 38 (1):131 - 141.score: 3.0
    Spinoza's project of showing how the mind can be freed from its passive affects and the State from its divisive factions (E IV.Appendix and V.Preface) (...)
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  15. Lee C. Rice (2001). Meyer As Precursor to Spinoza on the Interpretation of Scripture. Philosophy and Theology 13 (1):159-180.score: 3.0
    Following a brief historical account of the relationship between the PSSI and the TTP (as well as their respective authors), I provide a summary of Meyers (...)arguments (in the first two parts of the PSSI) for his claim that philosophy provides the unique norm of interpretation for Scripture. My third section is devoted to an analysis of the analytic relations between the PSSI and the TTP. A brief closing section offers several speculations on the clarifications which Meyers work may bring to Spinozas own development of a different account of scriptural exegesis in the TTP. (shrink)
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  16. MaríA. Luisa de la Cámara (ed.) (2008). Spinoza, de la Física a la Historia. Univ de Castilla La Mancha.score: 3.0
    Aunque admito sin reservas -nos dice Spinoza en su TTP- que todas las cosas son determinadas por leyes universales de la naturaleza a existir y a obrar (...)
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  17. R. Zopf, M. Berger, U. Klose & H. O. Karnath (2008). Perfusion Imaging of the Right Perisylvian Neural Network in Acute Spatial Neglect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:15-15.score: 3.0
    Recent studies have suggested a tightly connected perisylvian neural network associated with spatial neglect. Here we investigated whether structural damage in one part of the network typically (...)
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  18. Tomaž Mastnak (2008). Spinoza: Democracy and Revelation. Filozofski Vestnik 2.score: 3.0
    The question of whether Spinoza's political philosophy is radical is explored in the paper by focusing on the question of how successfully Spinoza solved the troubling (...)relation between religion and public authority in his work Tractatus theologico-politicus (TTP). This is a burning political issue today and was a pressing political concern in Spinoza's time as well as for Spinoza himself. After the examination of this problematic in TTP it is clear that Spinoza does not provide a coherent and compelling argument against revealed religion having a role in the founding of the state and in statecraft. A minimalist conclusion would be that Spinoza allows for a role of revealed religion in democracy. A more daring conclusion would point at the affinity between republican democracy and theocracy. In either case, with the TTP's help, we cannot avoid either theological politics or political theology. (shrink)
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