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  1. Yuko Okumura, Yasuhiro Kanakogi, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Shoji Itakura (2013). The Power of Human Gaze on Infant Learning. Cognition 128 (2):127-133.
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  2. Michihiro Shimada & Takayuki Kanda (2012). What is the Appropriate Speech Rate for a Communication Robot. Interaction Studies 13 (3):406-433.
    This study investigates the influence of a robot's speech rate. In human communication, slow speech is considered boring, speech at normal speed is perceived as credible, and fast speech is perceived as competent. To seek the appropriate speech rate for robots, we test whether these tendencies are replicated in human-robot interaction by conducting an experiment with four rates of speech: fast, normal, moderately slow, and slow. Our experimental results reveal a rather surprising trend. Participants prefer normal and moderately slow speech (...)
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  3. Christian Becker-Asano, Takayuki Kanda, Carlos Ishi & Hiroshi Ishiguro (2011). Studying Laughter in Combination with Two Humanoid Robots. AI and Society 26 (3):291-300.
    To let humanoid robots behave socially adequate in a future society, we started to explore laughter as an important para-verbal signal known to influence relationships among humans rather easily. We investigated how the naturalness of various types of laughter in combination with different humanoid robots was judged, first, within a situational context that is suitable for laughter and, second, without describing the situational context. Given the variety of human laughter, do people prefer a certain style for a robot’s laughter? And (...)
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  4. Yusuke Moriguchi, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Yoko Shimada & Shoji Itakura (2011). Can Young Children Learn Words From a Robot? Interaction Studies 12 (1):107-118.
    Young children generally learn words from other people. Recent research has shown that children can learn new actions and skills from nonhuman agents. This study examines whether young children could learn words from a robot. Preschool children were shown a video in which either a woman (human condition) or a mechanical robot (robot condition) labeled novel objects. Then the children were asked to select the objects according to the names used in the video. The results revealed that children in the (...)
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  5. Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda, Tomohiro Suzuki & Kensuke Kato (2009). Age Differences and Images of Robots: Social Survey in Japan. Interaction Studies 10 (3):374-391.
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  6. Christoph Bartneck, Tomohiro Suzuki, Takayuki Kanda & Tatsuya Nomura (2007). The Influence of People's Culture and Prior Experiences with Aibo on Their Attitude Towards Robots. AI and Society 21 (1-2):217-230.
    This paper presents a cross-cultural study on peoples’ negative attitude toward robots. 467 participants from seven different countries filled in the negative attitude towards robots scale survey which consists of 14 questions in three clusters: attitude towards the interaction with robots, attitude towards social influence of robots and attitude towards emotions in interaction with robots. Around one half of them were recruited at local universities and the other half was approached through Aibo online communities. The participants’ cultural background had a (...)
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  7. Peter H. Kahn, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Batya Friedman, Takayuki Kanda, Nathan G. Freier, Rachel L. Severson & Jessica Miller (2007). What is a Human? Toward Psychological Benchmarks in the Field of Humanrobot Interaction. Interaction Studies 8 (3):363-390.
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  8. Takayuki Kanda & Hiroshi Ishiguro (2006). An Approach for a Social Robot to Understand Human Relationships: Friendship Estimation Through Interaction with Robots. Interaction Studies 7 (3):369-403.
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  9. Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda & Tomohiro Suzuki (2006). Experimental Investigation Into Influence of Negative Attitudes Toward Robots on Human–Robot Interaction. AI and Society 20 (2):138-150.
    Negative attitudes toward robots are considered as one of the psychological factors preventing humans from interacting with robots in the daily life. To verify their influence on humans‘ behaviors toward robots, we designed and executed experiments where subjects interacted with Robovie, which is being developed as a platform for research on the possibility of communication robots. This paper reports and discusses the results of these experiments on correlation between subjects’ negative attitudes and their behaviors toward robots. Moreover, it discusses influences (...)
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  10. Tatsuya Nomura, Tomohiro Suzuki, Takayuki Kanda & Kensuke Kato (2006). Measurement of Negative Attitudes Toward Robots. Interaction Studies 7 (3):437-454.
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  11. Tatsuya Nomura, Takugo Tasaki, Takayuki Kanda, Masahiro Shiomi, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Norihiro Hagita (2006). Questionnaire-Based Social Research on Opinions of Japanese Visitors for Communication Robots at an Exhibition. AI and Society 21 (1-2):167-183.
    This paper reports the results of questionnaire-based research conducted at an exhibition of interactive humanoid robots that was held at the Osaka Science Museum, Japan. The aim of this exhibition was to investigate the feasibility of communication robots connected to a ubiquitous sensor network, under the assumption that these robots will be practically used in daily life in the not-so-distant future. More than 90,000 people visited the exhibition. A questionnaire was given to the visitors to explore their opinions of the (...)
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  12. Akiko Arita, Kazuo Hiraki, Takayuki Kanda & Hiroshi Ishiguro (2005). Can We Talk to Robots? Ten-Month-Old Infants Expected Interactive Humanoid Robots to Be Talked to by Persons. Cognition 95 (3):B49-B57.
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