Search results for 'Takuan Sōhō' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Takuan Sōhō (1986/2012). The Unfettered Mind. Shambhala.
    Introduction -- The Mysterious record of immovable wisdom -- The clear sound of jewels -- Annals of the Sword Taia.
     
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    S. Nagatomo & G. Leisman (1996). An East Asian Perspective of Mind-Body. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (4):439-466.
    This paper addresses a need to re-examine the mind-body dualism established since Descartes. Descartes' dualism has been regarded by modern philosophers as an extremely insufficient solution to the problem of mind and body, from which is derived a long opposition in modern epistomology between idealism and empiricism. This dualism, bifurcating the region of spirit and matter, and the dichotomous models of thinking based on this dualism, have long dominated the world of modern philosophy and science. The paper examines states of (...)
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    Julian Baggini (2005). The Soho Symposium. The Philosophers' Magazine 29:38-44.
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    Dennis Lishka (1978). Zen and the Creative Process: The 'Kendo-Zen'Thought of the Rinzai Master Takuan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 5 (2-3):139-158.
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    Christoph Kleine (2000). Review Of: Machida Soho, Renegade Monk: Honen and Japanese Pure Land Buddhism. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 27 (1-2):125-129.
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    Soho Machida (1999). Jesus, Man of Sin: Toward a New Christology in the Global Era. Buddhist-Christian Studies 19 (1):81-91.
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    Soho Machida (forthcoming). The Holy Spirit Through a Buddhist Lens. Buddhist-Christian Studies.
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  8. Sōhō Machida & Noriyuki Ueda (eds.) (2006). Shisō No Shintai. Shunjūsha.
  9. Thomas Martin (1962). Origins of the Royal Institution. British Journal for the History of Science 1 (1):49-63.
    The paper is an attempt to set the social and historical background against which the Royal Institution was founded, and to trace the events in its very early history. The founder of the Institution was Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford, that soldier of fortune who took service with the Elector Palatine of Bavaria, and it was in the course of his duties in Munich that his interest in the practical problems of philanthropy was aroused.In London, in the concluding years of the (...)
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  10. Ethan Smith, Look Who's Stalking.
    n a 25-year career as a successful public intellectual, Stephen Jay Gould has accrued nearly all the trappings of celebrity: a new loft in SoHo, tenure at Harvard, a gig at NYU, book sales totaling in the millions (his twentieth title, The Lying Stones of Marrak ech, comes out next month), not to mention a schedule that takes him to London, Paris, or L.A. almost weekly. Not bad for a college professor. But recently, he's picked up one of the less (...)
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  11. Larry Stewart (2002). Scientific Culture and the Making of the Industrial West. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:304-305.
    For those in the so‐called G‐7, G‐8, or G‐20, searching for the formula for economic takeoff, this is a book that deserves a reckoning. It explores the “role of culture,” which hitherto has had “no place in traditional economic explanations” of the history of industrial achievement. It is in the cultural and epistemological transformation of the eighteenth century that Margaret Jacob finds the foundation of industrial revolution. Jacob thereby dismisses the myth of the accidental genius or the inspired semiliterate backyard (...)
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