Search results for 'Talking' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  29
    Kevin Aho & Charles Guignon (2011). Medicalized Psychiatry and the Talking Cure: A Hermeneutic Intervention. [REVIEW] Human Studies 34 (3):293-308.
    The dominance of the medical-model in American psychiatry over the last 30 years has resulted in the subsequent decline of the “talking cure”. In this paper, we identify a number of problems associated with medicalized psychiatry, focusing primarily on how it conceptualizes the self as a de-contextualized set of symptoms. Drawing on the tradition of hermeneutic phenomenology, we argue that medicalized psychiatry invariably overlooks the fact that our identities, and the meanings and values that matter to us, are created (...)
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  2.  40
    E. Ronald & Moshe Sipper (2001). Intelligence is Not Enough: On the Socialization of Talking Machines. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 11 (4):567-576.
    Since the introduction of the imitation game by Turing in 1950 there has been much debate as to its validity in ascertaining machine intelligence. We wish herein to consider a different issue altogether: granted that a computing machine passes the Turing Test, thereby earning the label of ``Turing Chatterbox'', would it then be of any use (to us humans)? From the examination of scenarios, we conclude that when machines begin to participate in social transactions, unresolved issues of trust and responsibility (...)
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  3. Isidora Stojanovic (2007). Talking About Taste: Disagreement, Implicit Arguments, and Relative Truth. Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (6):691-706.
    In this paper, I take issue with an idea that has emerged from recent relativist proposals, and, in particular, from Lasersohn , according to which the correct semantics for taste predicates must use contents that are functions of a judge parameter rather than implicit arguments lexically associated with such predicates. I argue that the relativist account and the contextualist implicit argument-account are, from the viewpoint of semantics, not much more than notational variants of one another. In other words, given any (...)
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  4. Lynda Birke (2008). Talking About Horses: Control and Freedom in the World of "Natural Horsemanship". Society and Animals 16 (2):107-126.
    This paper explores how horses are represented in the discourses of "natural horsemanship" , an approach to training and handling horses that advocates see as better than traditional methods. In speaking about their horses, NH enthusiasts move between two registers: On one hand, they use a quasi-scientific narrative, relying on terms and ideas drawn from ethology, to explain the instinctive behavior of horses. Within this mode of narrative, the horse is "other" and must be understood through the human learning to (...)
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  5.  25
    Johane Patenaude, Georges Legault, Jean-Pierre Béland, Monelle Parent & Patrick Boissy (2011). Moral Arguments in the Debate Over Nanotechnologies: Are We Talking Past Each Other? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (3):285-293.
    How are we to understand the fact that the philosophical debate over nanotechnologies has been reduced to a clash of seemingly preprogrammed arguments and counterarguments that paralyzes all rational discussion of the ultimate ethical question of social acceptability in matters of nanotechnological development? With this issue as its starting point, the study reported on here, intended to further comprehension of the issues rather than provide a cause-and-effect explanation, seeks to achieve a rational grasp of what is being said through the (...)
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  6.  17
    Roger Wertheimer, Talking With Objects -2013.
    Talking about objects requires talking with objects, presenting objects in speech to identify a term's referent. I say This figure is a circle while handing you a ring. The ring is a prop, a perceptual object referenced by an extra-sentential event to identify the extension of a term, its director ('This figure'). Props operate in speech acts and their products, not in sentences. Intra-sentential objects we talk with are displays. Displayed objects needn't be words but must be like (...)
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  7. Linda Joy Morrison (2005). Talking Back to Psychiatry: The Psychiatric Consumer/Survivor/Ex-Patient Movement. Routledge.
    Linda Morrison brings the voices and issues of a little-known, complex social movement to the attention of sociologists, mental health professionals, and the general public. The members of this social movement work to gain voice for their own experience, to raise consciousness of injustice and inequality, to expose the darker side of psychiatry, and to promote alternatives for people in emotional distress. Talking Back to Psychiatry explores the movement's history, its complex membership, its strategies and goals, and the varied (...)
     
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  8. István Aranyosi (2012). Talking About Nothing. Numbers, Hallucinations, and Fictions. Philosophy 87 (1):145-150.
    If everything exists, then it looks, prima facie, as if talking about nothing is equivalent to not talking about anything. However, we appear as talking or thinking about particular nothings, that is, about particular items that are not among the existents. How to explain this phenomenon? One way is to deny that everything exists, and consequently to be ontologically committed to nonexistent “objects”. Another way is to deny that the process of thinking about such nonexistents is a (...)
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  9.  33
    Ronald Paul Hill (2004). The Socially-Responsible University: Talking the Talk While Walking the Walk in the College of Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):89-100.
    This article presents a stakeholder-based example of corporate social responsibility (CSR) within a university context. The first section provides a literature review that builds the case for CSR efforts by educational institutions. The next section details aspects of the focal corporate social responsibility program at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg (USFSP) from its early conception to its implementation. The Talking the Talk section describes the overarching mission of the larger university and its influence on the mission of (...)
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  10.  74
    Juan José Lara (2011). Talking About Nothing. [REVIEW] Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy (3).
    Review of "Talking about nothing. Numbers, hallucinations, and fictons". Jody Azzouni. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.
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  11. Michael Gorman (2006). Talking About Intentional Objects. Dialectica 60 (2):135-144.
    Discusses the old problem of how to characterize apparently intentional states that appear to lack objects. In tandem with critically discussing a recent proposal by Tim Crane, I develop the line of reasoning according to which talking about intentional objects is really a way of talking about intentional states—in particular, it’s a way of talking about their satisfaction-conditions.
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  12. John M. Heaton (2010). The Talking Cure: Wittgenstein's Therapeutic Method for Psychotherapy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The problem -- Fearless speech -- Talking versus writing -- The critical method -- Reasons and causes -- Elucidations -- Back to the rough ground -- The self and images -- A non-foundational therapy.
     
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  13.  6
    N. Leila Trapp (2011). Staff Attitudes to Talking Openly About Ethical Dilemmas: The Role of Business Ethics Conceptions and Trust. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):543 - 552.
    To ensure ethical employee behavior, companies often utilize several forms of mostly one-way communication such as codes of conduct. The extent to which these efforts, in addition to informing about the company stance on ethics, are able to positively influence behavior is disputed. In contrast, research on business ethics communication and behavior indicates a relatively clear, positive link between open workplace dialogue about ethical issues and ethical conduct. In this article, I therefore address the question: What influences employee attitudes to (...)
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  14.  16
    Steffen Borge (2013). Talking to Infants: A Gricean Perspective. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):423.
    According to Paul Grice, when we address someone, we intend to make ourselves understood, partly by the addressee’s recognition of that intention. Call this set of nested audience-directed intentions an M-intention. The standard Gricean analysis of speaker’s meaning goes as follows: “U meant something by uttering x” is true iff, for some audience A, U uttered x intending: (1) A to produce a particular response r (2) A to think (recognize) that U intends (1) (3) A to fulfill (1) on (...)
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  15.  41
    Jeffrey Goodman (2007). A Critical Discussion of Talking Past One Another. Philosophy and Rhetoric 40 (3):311-325.
    One sort of usage of the phrase ‘talking past one another’ that is quite prevalent in the philosophical literature suggests the following account of a particular phenomenon of miscommunication: Agent A and agent B talk past one another during a philosophical discussion if and only if A has in mind one meaning or conception of a crucial expression P that is distinct from some meaning or conception of P had in mind by B. In this paper, however, I argue (...)
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  16.  23
    N. Leila Trapp (2011). Staff Attitudes to Talking Openly About Ethical Dilemmas: The Role of Business Ethics Conceptions and Trust. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):543-552.
    To ensure ethical employee behavior, companies often utilize several forms of mostly one-way communication such as codes of conduct. The extent to which these efforts, in addition to informing about the company stance on ethics, are able to positively influence behavior is disputed. In contrast, research on business ethics communication and behavior indicates a relatively clear, positive link between open workplace dialogue about ethical issues and ethical conduct. In this article, I therefore address the question: What influences employee attitudes to (...)
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  17.  18
    José Carlos Bermejo Barrera (2001). Making History, Talking About History. History and Theory 40 (2):190–205.
    Making history - in the sense of writing it - is often set against talking about it, with most historians considering writing history to be better than talking about it. My aim in this article is to analyze the topic of making history versus talking about history in order to understand most historians' evident decision to ignore talking about history. Ultimately my goal is to determine whether it is possible to talk about history with any sense.To (...)
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  18.  9
    Marjorie Becker (2002). Talking Back to Frida: Houses of Emotional Mestizaje. History and Theory 41 (4):56–71.
    Talking Back to Frida: Houses of Emotional Mestizaje” is, in part, a historical meditation on the silencing of three women, Frida Kahlo, Maria Enríquez, a Mexican woman who was sexually assaulted in 1924, and me. Written in an innovative historical fashion that joins techniques drawn from fiction, journalism, and history, the article attempts to understand specific assaults on women’s voices by drawing readers into the historical worlds of the protagonists. “Talking Back” also seeks to respond to Hans Kellner’s (...)
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  19.  3
    C. Jaye (2004). Talking Around Embodiment: The Views of GPs Following Participation in Medical Anthropology Courses. Medical Humanities 30 (1):41-48.
    Objectives: To explore the ways in which general practitioners talk around the concept of “embodiment” after participating in introductory courses in medical anthropology, and to contribute to the debate about what persons and bodies mean for biomedicine. Design: This study used a qualitative interview methodology. Participants: Participants were general practitioners who had all completed at least one introductory course in medical anthropology. Results: In talking around embodiment, respondents articulated several interconnected dimensions of meaning. These included (...)
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  20.  1
    Louis Arnaud Reid (1966). On Talking About the Arts. Philosophy 41 (158):320 - 332.
    I want to concentrate on two kinds of talking about the arts. One concerns those aspects of the language of philosophical aesthetics in which generalisations about ‘art’ and ‘the arts’ are made. The other concerns the language of the critic in so far as it can be stated as having a very particular aim: ‘the stimulation’ ‘of interest and the heightening of insight and the education of his ability to make his own appreciative judgments from direct experience’.
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  21. Jody Azzouni (2012). Talking About Nothing: Numbers, Hallucinations and Fictions. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Ordinary language and scientific language enable us to speak about, in a singular way, what we recognize not to exist: fictions, the contents of our hallucinations, abstract objects, and various idealized but nonexistent objects that our scientific theories are often couched in terms of. Indeed, references to such nonexistent items-especially in the case of the application of mathematics to the sciences-are indispensable. We cannot avoid talking about such things. Scientific and ordinary languages thus enable us to say things about (...)
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  22. James Carter (1999). Talking Books: Children's Authors Talk About the Craft, Creativity and Process of Writing. Routledge.
    _Talking Books_ sets out to show how some of the leading children's authors of the day respond to these and other similar questions. The authors featured are _ Neil Ardley, Ian Beck, Helen Cresswell, Gillian Cross, Terry Deary, Berlie Doherty, Alan Durant, Brian Moses, Philip Pullman, Celia Rees, Norman Silver, Jacqueline Wilson, and Benjamin Zephaniah_. They discuss with great enthusiasm: *their childhood reading habits *how they came to be published *how they write on a daily basis *how a particular book (...)
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  23. Marie Farrell (2011). A Thinker's Guide to Sin: Talking About Wrongdoing Today [Book Review]. The Australasian Catholic Record 88 (3):380.
    Farrell, Marie Review(s) of: A thinker's guide to sin: talking about wrongdoing today, by Neil Darragh ed. (Auckland, N.Z.: Accent Publications, 2010), pp.228, $35.
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  24. Andrew Fisher & Jonathan Tallant (2015). How to Get Philosophy Students Talking: An Instructor's Toolkit. Routledge.
    Engaging undergraduate students and instigating debate within philosophy seminars is one of the greatest challenges faced by instructors on a daily basis. _How to Get Philosophy Students Talking: An Instructor’s Toolkit _is an innovative and original resource designed for use by academics looking to help students of all abilities get the most out of their time spent in group discussions. Each chapter features thought experiments, discussion questions and further readings on topics within the following core areas of philosophy: Metaphysics (...)
     
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  25. Benedetto Fontana, Cary J. Nederman & Gary Remer (eds.) (2005). Talking Democracy: Historical Perspectives on Rhetoric and Democracy. Penn State University Press.
    In their efforts to uncover the principles of a robust conception of democracy, theorists of deliberative democracy place a premium on the role of political expression—public speech and reasoned debate—as the key to democratic processes. They also frequently hark back to historical antecedents in their quest to establish that deliberative procedures are more than “merely theoretical” and instead have a practical application. But for all this emphasis on the discursive and historical dimensions of democracy, these theorists have generally neglected the (...)
     
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  26. Ramin Jahanbegloo (2015). Talking Philosophy: Richard Sorabji in Conversation with Ramin Jahanbegloo. Oxford University Press India.
    Talking Philosophy is as much a recollection of Sorabjis childhood and his scholarly life at Oxford as it is a philosophical reflection on issues as varied and complex as whether animals have reason or whether Gandhi could be considered an ethical role model.
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  27. Ike Kamphof (forthcoming). Whose Art Are We Talking About? Foundations of Science:1-4.
    Jeannette Pols and Tamar Sharon kindly reviewed my case study of the art of living with technology as an engagement with technomoral change. I am indebted to them for their careful reading and critical suggestions to further elaborate the project. In my response I focus on the question whose art we are talking about, while further elucidating the reflexivity addressed in my essay. I conclude with some remarks on what we can learn from micro studies like the one presented (...)
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  28.  9
    Benjamin Lee (1997). Talking Heads: Language, Metalanguage, and the Semiotics of Subjectivity. Duke University Press.
    TALKING HEADS synthesizes the views and works of a breathtaking range of the most influential modern theorists of the humanities and social sciences.
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  29.  13
    Richard Levins (2008). Talking About Trees: Science, Ecology, and Agriculture in Cuba. Leftword Books.
    Talking About Trees ranges widely, from personal narratives to theoretical discussions on the need for the precautionary principle in science.
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  30. Jennifer Mueller (2010). Does Talking the Talk Mean Walking the Walk? A Case for Forging Closer Relationships Between Teacher Education and Educational Foundations. Educational Studies 39 (2):146-162.
    (2006). Does Talking the Talk Mean Walking the Walk? A Case for Forging Closer Relationships Between Teacher Education and Educational Foundations. Educational Studies: Vol. 39, No. 2, pp. 146-162.
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  31. David Newman (2005). Talking with Doctors. Routledge.
    Without any warning, in September 1999, David Newman was told he had a rare and life-threatening tumor in the base of his skull. In the compressed space of five weeks, he consulted with leading physicians and surgeons at four major medical centers. The doctors offered drastically differing opinions; several pronounced the tumor inoperable and voiced skepticism about the effectiveness of any nonsurgical treatment. _Talking with Doctors_ is the story of Newman's efforts, at a time of great stress and even impending (...)
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  32. A. W. Sparkes (1994). Talking Politics: A Wordbook. Routledge.
    Talking Politics is a philosophical examination of some of the basic concepts of political discourse. Its primary focus is on the ordinary ; on what is said by politicians, in newspapers and by people in pubs, rather than on the works of political theorists. This is a work of , but not on political theory. Talking Politics is: * Invaluable as a source of reference for students, and contains a detailed index * Arranged thematically, around topics such as (...)
     
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  33. A. W. Sparkes (2006). Talking Politics: A Wordbook. Routledge.
    _Talking Politics_ is a philosophical examination of some of the basic concepts of political discourse. Its primary focus is on the _ordinary_; on what is said by politicians, in newspapers and by people in pubs, rather than on the works of political theorists. This is a work _of_, but not _on_ political theory. _Talking Politics_ is: * Invaluable as a source of reference for students, and contains a detailed index * Arranged thematically, around topics such as `Nation'. Each entry has (...)
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  34. Brian Conniff (1999). Talking Ghosts, LivingTraditions: Political Violence, Catholicism, and Seamus Heaney's. Logos 2 (2).
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  35. John M. Doris (2015). Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency. OUP Oxford.
    Do we know what we're doing, and why? Psychological research seems to suggest not: reflection and self-awareness are surprisingly uncommon and inaccurate. John M. Doris presents a new account of agency and responsibility, which reconciles our understanding of ourselves as moral agents with empirical work on the unconscious mind.
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  36.  78
    Jody Azzouni (2010). Talking About Nothing: Numbers, Hallucinations, and Fictions. Oxford University Press.
    Numbers -- Hallucinations -- Fictions -- Scientific languages, ontology, and truth -- Truth conditions and semantics.
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  37.  22
    Jared Warren (2015). Talking with Tonkers. Philosophers' Imprint 15 (24).
    Unrestricted inferentialism holds both that any collection of inference rules can determine a meaning for an expression and meaning constituting rules are automatically valid. Prior's infamous tonk connective refuted unrestricted inferentialism, or so it is universally thought. This paper argues against this consensus. I start by formulating the metasemantic theses of inferentialism with more care than they have hitherto received; I then consider a tonk language — Tonklish — and argue that the unrestricted inferentialist's treatment of this language is only (...)
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  38.  24
    Neil Levy (forthcoming). Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency, by Doris, John M. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  39.  73
    J. Tambornino (2006). Book Review: Talking To Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship Since Brown V. Board of Education. [REVIEW] Political Theory 34 (1):141-144.
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  40. Ian Hunter (2008). Talking About My Generation. Critical Inquiry 34 (3):583-600.
    This article is a response to Fredric Jameson's criticisms of the author's 'The History of Theory'. For Jameson's article, 'How Not to Historicise Theory', see Critical Inquiry, 34, Spring 2008. The author situates Jameson's arguments in the context of the historicisation of theory, treating them as an example of the theoretical program to think the historical determinations of thought. It is argued that this program is an instrument for the formation of the privileged intellectual persona of the theorist.
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  41. Sally Anne Haslanger (2005). What Are We Talking About? The Semantics and Politics of Social Kinds. Hypatia 20 (4):10-26.
    : Theorists analyzing the concepts of race and gender disagree over whether the terms refer to natural kinds, social kinds, or nothing at all. The question arises: what do we mean by the terms? It is usually assumed that ordinary intuitions of native speakers are definitive. However, I argue that contemporary semantic externalism can usefully combine with insights from Foucauldian genealogy to challenge mainstream methods of analysis and lend credibility to social constructionist projects.
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  42.  90
    Geoff Cooper (1992). Talking to Others: Ethnomethodology's 'Foundational Respecification'. History of the Human Sciences 5 (2):131-140.
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  43.  19
    Kevin J. S. Zollman (2005). Talking to Neighbors: The Evolution of Regional Meaning. Philosophy of Science 72 (1):69-85.
    In seeking to explain the evolution of social cooperation, many scholars are using increasingly complex game-theoretic models. These complexities often model readily observable features of human and animal populations. In the case of previous games analyzed in the literature, these modifications have had radical effects on the stability and efficiency properties of the models. We will analyze the effect of adding spatial structure to two communication games: the Lewis Sender-Receiver game and a modified Stag Hunt game. For the Stag Hunt, (...)
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  44. Cade Bushnell (2012). Talking the Talk: The Interactional Construction of Community and Identity at Conversation Analytic Data Sessions in Japan. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (4):583-605.
    A communities of practice framework views learning in terms of identity (trans)formation within and through participation, utilizing a set of shared resources, in a community organized around a joint endeavor, or practice. From an ethnomethodological perspective, however, the theoretical notions of community, shared resources, and identity constitute not explanatory resources, but rather topics requiring data-grounded exploration. In other words, the following empirical questions arise: If and how the participants (a) organize their group as community, (b) co-constitute a shared (...)
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  45.  55
    Frances Taylor Gench (forthcoming). Book Review: Testimony: Talking Ourselves Into Being Christian. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (2):221-221.
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  46. Robert Sparrow (2002). Talking Sense About Political Correctness. Journal of Australian Studies 73:119-133.
  47.  46
    Sam Baron (2013). Talking About the Past. Erkenntnis 78 (3):547-560.
    In this paper I consider the aboutness objection against standard truth-preserving presentism (STP). According to STP: (1) past-directed propositions (propositions that seem to be about the past) like , are sometimes true (2) truth supervenes on being and (3) the truth of past-directed propositions does not supervene on how things were, in the past. According to the aboutness objection (3) is implausible, given (1) and (2): for any proposition, P, P ought to be true in virtue of what P is (...)
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  48.  12
    Mark G. Kuczewski (2007). Talking About Spirituality in the Clinical Setting: Can Being Professional Require Being Personal? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):4 – 11.
    Spirituality or religion often presents as a foreign element to the clinical environment, and its language and reasoning can be a source of conflict there. As a result, the use of spirituality or religion by patients and families seems to be a solicitation that is destined to be unanswered and seems to open a distance between those who speak this language and those who do not. I argue that there are two promising approaches for engaging such language and helping patients (...)
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  49. Joanne Conaghan & Yvette Russell (2015). Talking Law and Gender. Feminist Legal Studies 23 (2):199-214.
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  50. Vincent Yzerbyt, Toon Kuppens & Bernard Mathieu (2016). When Talking Makes You Feel Like a Group: The Emergence of Group-Based Emotions. Cognition and Emotion 30 (1):33-50.
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