Search results for 'Tamar Lando' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tamar Lando (2012). Completeness of S4 for the Lebesgue Measure Algebra. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):287-316.score: 240.0
    We prove completeness of the propositional modal logic S 4 for the measure algebra based on the Lebesgue-measurable subsets of the unit interval, [0, 1]. In recent talks, Dana Scott introduced a new measure-based semantics for the standard propositional modal language with Boolean connectives and necessity and possibility operators, and . Propositional modal formulae are assigned to Lebesgue-measurable subsets of the real interval [0, 1], modulo sets of measure zero. Equivalence classes of Lebesgue-measurable subsets form a measure algebra, , and (...)
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  2. Tamar Lando (2012). Dynamic Measure Logic. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 163 (12):1719-1737.score: 240.0
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  3. Andrea Borghini & Giorgio Lando (2011). Natural Properties, Supervenience, and Composition. Humana.Mente 19:79-104.score: 30.0
    The interpretation of Lewis?s doctrine of natural properties is difficult and controversial, especially when it comes to the bearers of natural properties. According to the prevailing reading ? the minimalist view ? perfectly natural properties pertain to the micro-physical realm and are instantiated by entities without proper parts or point-like. This paper argues that there are reasons internal to a broadly Lewisian kind of metaphysics to think that the minimalist view is fundamentally flawed and that a liberal view, according to (...)
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  4. Giorgio Lando (2007). Teorie Dell'assurdo. I Rivali Del Principio di Non-Contraddizione – by Francesco Berto. Dialectica 61 (2):291–295.score: 30.0
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  5. Giorgio Lando (2011). Assertion and Affirmation in the Early Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein Studien 2 (1):21-47.score: 30.0
    The Tractatus rejects the sign of assertion as "logically meaningless", but the rejection of the sign did not lead Wittgenstein to reject the corresponding notion. I show the presence and the importance in the early Wittgenstein of a notion keenly similar to Fregean and Russellian logical assertion. I propose to call this notion "affirmation." The preparatory writings and the TLP present different theories about affirmation. The correct understanding of the nature and purpose of affirmation proves critical in order to confront (...)
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  6. Giorgio Lando (2012). Russell's Relations, Wittgenstein's Objects, and the Theory of Types. Teorema (2):21-35.score: 30.0
    We discuss a previously unnoticed resemblance between the theory of relations and predicates in The Philosophy of Logical Atomism [TPLA] by Russell and the theory of objects and names in the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus [TLP] by Wittgenstein. Points of likeness are detected on three levels: ontology, syntax, and semantics. This analogy explains the prima facie similarities between the informal presentation of the theory of types in TPLA and the sections of the TLP devoted to this same topic. Eventually, we draw some (...)
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  7. Giorgio Lando (2007). Tractarian Ontology: Mereology or Set Theory? Forum Philosophicum 12 (2):24-39.score: 30.0
    I analyze the relations of constituency or ``being in'' that connect different ontological items in the Tractatus logico-philosophicus by Wittgenstein. A state of affairs is constituted by atoms, atoms are in a state of affairs. Atoms are also in an atomic fact. Moreover, the world is the totality of facts, thus it is in some sense made of facts. Many other kinds of Tractarian notions -- such as molecular facts, logical space, reality -- seem to be involved in constituency relations. (...)
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  8. Giorgio Lando (2011). Fostering the Ontological Turn. Gustav Bergmann (1906–1987) – Edited by Rosaria Egidi, Guido Bonino. Dialectica 65 (2):281-285.score: 30.0
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  9. Ole Lando (2009). 11. Making the Principles of European Contract Law: Theoretical and Methodological Aspects. In Antonina Bakardjieva Engelbrekt (ed.), New Directions in Comparative Law. Edward Elgar. 165.score: 30.0
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  10. Alpaidze Tamar (2004). Интернет и его правовое регулирование. In Christopher Roederer & Darrel Moellendorf (eds.), Jurisprudence. Kluwer. 1--48.score: 30.0
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  11. Meisels Tamar (2003). Liberal Nationalism and Territorial Rights. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1).score: 30.0
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  12. Tyler Doggett (2012). Some Questions for Tamar Szabo Gendler. [REVIEW] Analysis 72 (4):764-774.score: 15.0
    Contribution to a symposium on Gendler's Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology.
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  13. Paul Gilbert (2009). Messy Morality: The Challenge of Politics – by C. A. J. Coady the Trouble with Terror: Liberty, Security and the Response to Terrorism – by Tamar Meisels Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism: Ethics and Liberal Democracy – by Seumas Miller. [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):418-420.score: 15.0
  14. Paul Coates (2009). Perceptual Experience – Tamar Gendler and John Hawthorne. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (234):173-176.score: 15.0
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  15. Tyler Doggett (2011). Review of Tamar Szabo Gendler's Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 15.0
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  16. Neb Kujundzic (2002). Thought Experiment: On the Powers and Limits of Imaginary Cases Tamar Szabó Gendler Studies in Philosophy New York: Garland Publishing, 2000, Xvii + 258 Pp., $75.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (02):407-.score: 15.0
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  17. Brigitte Sassen (2001). Tamar Japaridze, The Kantian Subject: Sensus Communis, Mimesis, Work of Mourning Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (1):47-48.score: 15.0
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  18. Soraj Hongladarom (2013). Tamar Szabó Gendler: Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 23 (4):509-513.score: 15.0
  19. Gila Safran-Naveh (1996). Tamar's Restoration of The. Semiotics:82-90.score: 15.0
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  20. M. A. Gardell (1985). LeRoy Walters and Tamar Joy Kahn (Eds.): 1984 Bibliography of Bioethics, Vol. 1.0, Georgetown University, Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Washington, D.C., 387 Pp. $ 25.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (4):399-400.score: 15.0
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  21. Brian Klug (2008). A Response to Tamar Meisels. Think 7 (20):91-92.score: 15.0
    Our third and final article on the the Israel/Palestine conflict and anti-semitism.
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  22. R. W. Mulligan (1987). Divine Omniscience and Omnipotence in Medieval Philosophy: Islamic, Jewish, and Christian Perspectives. Edited by Tamar Rudavsky. Modern Schoolman 64 (3):207-209.score: 15.0
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  23. Gila Safran-Naveh (1996). Tamar's Restoration of the "Self". Semiotics 38:82-90.score: 15.0
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  24. John W. Coakley (2011). Tamar Herzig, Savonarola's Women: Visions and Reform in Renaissance Italy. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2008. Pp. Xix, 333; Black-and-White Frontispiece, 7 Black-and-White Figures, and 2 Maps. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):215-217.score: 15.0
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  25. Yeshayahu Leibowitz (2013). Lebovits Mitpalmes: Timlul Ṿe-Teʻud Ṿideʼo Shel 13 Sheʻot Pulmus: Yeshaʻayahu Leibovits Mitpalmes Be-Hanḥayat Yonah Hadari ʻim Avi Śagi, Zeʼev Harvi, Mosheh Halberṭal, Tamar Ros, Yaʻaḳov Leṿinger, Eliʻezer Goldman, Asa Kasher, ʻazmi Basharah Ṿe-Yosi Ziv. [REVIEW] Karmel.score: 15.0
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  26. Nenad Miščević (2007). Tamar Szabo Gendler and John Hawthorne (Eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology. Volume 1. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21:507-512.score: 15.0
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  27. Alfred K. Siewers (2011). Stephen Rippon, Peter Claughton, and Chris Smart, Mining in a Medieval Landscape: The Royal Silver Mines of the Tamar Valley. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2009. Pp. Xiii, 207; Black-and-White Frontispiece, Black-and-White Figures, and Tables. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (3):798-800.score: 15.0
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  28. Martijn Blaauw (2006). Belief and Pretense: A Reply to Gendler. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):204-209.score: 9.0
    In cases of imaginative contagion, imagining something has doxastic or doxastic-like consequences. In this reply to Tamar Szabó Gendler's article in this collection, I investigate what the philosophical consequences of these cases could be. I argue (i) that imaginative contagion has consequences for how we should understand the nature of imagination and (ii) that imaginative contagion has consequences for our understanding of what belief-forming mechanisms there are. Along the way, I make some remarks about what the consequences of the (...)
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  29. Joshua Mugg (2013). What Are the Cognitive Costs of Racism? A Reply to Gendler. Philosophical Studies 166 (2):217-229.score: 9.0
    Tamar Gendler argues that, for those living in a society in which race is a salient sociological feature, it is impossible to be fully rational: members of such a society must either fail to encode relevant information containing race, or suffer epistemic costs by being implicitly racist. However, I argue that, although Gendler calls attention to a pitfall worthy of study, she fails to conclusively demonstrate that there are epistemic (or cognitive) costs of being racist. Gendler offers three supporting (...)
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  30. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2008). Table of Contents From the Elements of Philosophy: Readings From Past and Present. Oxford.score: 6.0
    (ed. Tamar Szabo Gendler, Susanna Siegel and Steven M. Cahn) Oxford, 2007.
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  31. Tamar Gendler (2010). Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    In this volume, Tamar Gendler draws together fourteen essays that together illuminate this topic. Three intertwined themes connect the essays.
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  32. Tamar Meisels (2008). Is It Good for the Jews? A Response to Brian Klug's 'a Plea for Distinctions: Disentangling Anti-Americanism From Anti-Semitism'. Think 7 (20):85-90.score: 6.0
    Tamar Meisels responds to the preceding article.
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  33. Letitia Meynell (2014). Imagination and Insight: A New Acount of the Content of Thought Experiments. Synthese 191 (17):4149-4168.score: 6.0
    This paper motivates, explains, and defends a new account of the content of thought experiments. I begin by briefly surveying and critiquing three influential accounts of thought experiments: James Robert Brown’s Platonist account, John Norton’s deflationist account that treats them as picturesque arguments, and a cluster of views that I group together as mental model accounts. I use this analysis to motivate a set of six desiderata for a new approach. I propose that we treat thought experiments primarily as aesthetic (...)
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  34. Tamar Gendler, Susanna Siegel & Steven M. Cahn (eds.) (2008). The Elements of Philosophy: Readings From Past and Present. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    The Elements of Philosophy: Readings from Past and Present is a comprehensive collection of historical and contemporary readings across the major fields of philosophy. With depth and quality, this introductory anthology offers a selection of readings that is both extensive and expansive; the readings span twenty-five centuries. They are organized topically into five parts: Religion and Belief, Moral and Political Philosophy, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind and Language, and Life and Death. The product of the collaboration of three highly (...)
     
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  35. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2008). Alief and Belief. Journal of Philosophy 105 (10):634-663.score: 3.0
    Forthcoming, Journal of Philosophy [pdf manuscript].
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  36. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2000). The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance. Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):55-81.score: 3.0
  37. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2008). Alief in Action (and Reaction). Mind and Language 23 (5):552--585.score: 3.0
    I introduce and argue for the importance of a cognitive state that I call alief. An alief is, to a reasonable approximation, an innate or habitual propensity to respond to an apparent stimulus in a particular way. Recognizing the role that alief plays in our cognitive repertoire provides a framework for understanding reactions that are governed by nonconscious or automatic mechanisms, which in turn brings into proper relief the role played by reactions that are subject to conscious regulation and deliberate (...)
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  38. Tamar Szabó Gendler & John Hawthorne (2002). Introduction: Conceivability and Possibility. In T. Szabó Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Conceivability and Possibility. Oxford University Press. 1--70.score: 3.0
    To what extent and how is conceivability a guide to possibility? This essay explores general philosophical issues raised by this question, and critically surveys responses to it by Descartes, Hume, Kripke and "two-dimensionalists.".
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  39. Shen-yi Liao & Tamar Szabó Gendler (2011). Pretense and Imagination. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews 2 (1):79-94.score: 3.0
    Issues of pretense and imagination are of central interest to philosophers, psychologists, and researchers in allied fields. In this entry, we provide a roadmap of some of the central themes around which discussion has been focused. We begin with an overview of pretense, imagination, and the relationship between them. We then shift our attention to the four specific topics where the disciplines' research programs have intersected or where additional interactions could prove mutually beneficial: the psychological underpinnings of performing pretense and (...)
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  40. Tamar Szabó Gendler & John Hawthorne (2005). The Real Guide to Fake Barns: A Catalogue of Gifts for Your Epistemic Enemies. Philosophical Studies 124 (3):331-352.score: 3.0
    Perhaps the concept of knowledge, prior to its being fashioned and molded by certain philosophical traditions, never offered any stable negative verdict in the original fake barn case.
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  41. Tamar Schapiro (1999). What is a Child? Ethics 109 (4):715–738.score: 3.0
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  42. Shen-yi Liao & Tamar Szabó Gendler (forthcoming). The Problem of Imaginative Resistance: An Overview. In John Gibson & Nöel Carroll (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge.score: 3.0
    The problem of imaginative resistance holds interest for aestheticians, literary theorists, ethicists, philosophers of mind, and epistemologists. We present a somewhat opinionated overview of the philosophical discussion to date. We begin by introducing the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. We then review existing responses to the problem, giving special attention to recent research directions. Finally, we consider the philosophical significance that imaginative resistance has—or, at least, is alleged to have—for issues in moral psychology, theories of cognitive architecture, and modal epistemology.
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  43. Tamar Szabó Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.) (2002). Conceivability and Possibility. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    The capacity to represent things to ourselves as possible plays a crucial role both in everyday thinking and in philosophical reasoning; this volume offers much-needed philosophical illumination of conceivability, possibility, and the relations between them.
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  44. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2011). On the Epistemic Costs of Implicit Bias. Philosophical Studies 156 (1):33-63.score: 3.0
  45. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2007). Philosophical Thought Experiments, Intuitions, and Cognitive Equilibrium. In Peter A. French & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.), Philosophy and the Empirical. Blackwell Pub. Inc.. 68-89.score: 3.0
    It is a commonplace that contemplation of an imaginary particular may have cognitive and motivational effects that differ from those evoked by an abstract description of an otherwise similar state of affairs. In his Treatise on Human Nature, Hume ([1739] 1978) writes forcefully of this.
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  46. Tamar Szabó Gendler & Karson Kovakovich (2006). Genuine Rational Fictional Emotions. In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Blackwell. 241-253.score: 3.0
    The “paradox of fictional emotions” involves a trio of claims that are jointly inconsistent but individually plausible. Resolution of the paradox thus requires that we deny at least one of these plausible claims. The paradox has been formulated in various ways (some of which we discuss below), but for the purposes of this chapter, we will focus on the following three claims, which we will refer to respectively as the Response Condition (1), the <span class='Hi'>Belief</span> Condition (2) and the Coordination (...)
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  47. Jennifer Nagel (2012). Gendler on Alief. [REVIEW] Analysis 72 (4):774-788.score: 3.0
    Contribution to a book symposium on Tamar Gendler's Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology.
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  48. Tamar Szabó Gendler, Five Ancient Secrets to Modern Happiness (Powerpoint Slides).score: 3.0
    – develop self-knowledge [Socrates] – cultivate internal harmony [Plato] – foster virtue through habit [Aristotle] – cultivate and appreciate true friendship [Cicero] – recognize what is and is not in your control [Epictetus].
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  49. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2002). Personal Identity and Thought-Experiments. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):34-54.score: 3.0
    Through careful analysis of a specific example, Parfit’s ‘fission argument’ for the unimportance of personal identity, I argue that our judgements concerning imaginary scenarios are likely to be unreliable when the scenarios involve disruptions of certain contingent correlations. Parfit’s argument depends on our hypothesizing away a number of facts which play a central role in our understanding and employment of the very concept under investigation; as a result, it fails to establish what Parfit claims, namely, that identity is not what (...)
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