Search results for 'Tantric Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Elias Capriles (2008). Hegel's Inversion of the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic View of History. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:39-45.
    Hegel inverted the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic view of human spiritual and social evolution by presenting it as a progressive perfecting rather than as a progressive degeneration impelled by the gradual development of the basic human delusion called avidya (unawareness). Since he cancelled the crucial map /territory distinction, he had to explain change in nature as the negation of the immediately preceding state, and since he wanted spiritual and social evolution to be a process of perfecting, he had (...)
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  2. Minoru Kiyota (1983/1982). Tantric Concept of Bodhicitta: A Buddhist Experiential Philosophy (an Exposition Based Upon the Mah⁻Avairocana-S⁻Utra, Bodhicitta-Ś⁻Astra and Sokushin-J⁻Obutsu-Gi). South Asian Area Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
     
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  3. Christian K. Wedemeyer (2014). Making Sense of Tantric Buddhism: History, Semiology, and Transgression in the Indian Traditions. Cup.
    _Making Sense of Tantric Buddhism_ fundamentally rethinks the nature of the transgressive theories and practices of the Buddhist Tantric traditions, challenging the notion that the Tantras were "marginal" or primitive and situating them instead -- both ideologically and institutionally -- within larger trends in mainstream Buddhist and Indian culture. Critically surveying prior scholarship, Wedemeyer exposes the fallacies of attributing Tantric transgression to either the passions of lusty monks, primitive tribal rites, or slavish imitation of Saiva traditions. Through (...)
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  4.  11
    Jeffrey Hopkins (1990). Tantric Buddhism, Degeneration or Enhancement: The Viewpoint of a Tibetan Tradition. Buddhist-Christian Studies 10:87-96.
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  5.  6
    Ann Gleig (2013). From Theravada to Tantra: The Making of an American Tantric Buddhism? Contemporary Buddhism 14 (2):221-238.
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  6.  1
    Christian K. Wedemeyer (2012). Making Sense of Tantric Buddhism: History, Semiology, and Transgression in the Indian Traditions. Columbia University Press.
    Innovative readings of the "Guhyasamaja Tantra" underscore the text's overriding concern with purity, pollution, and transcendent insight and a large-scale, quantitative study of Tantric literature shows its radical antinomianism to be a ...
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  7.  9
    Emily McRae (2015). Metabolizing Anger: A Tantric Buddhist Solution to the Problem of Moral Anger. Philosophy East and West 65 (2):466-484.
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  8. Saso Michael (1987). Kuden: The Oral Hermeneutics of Tendai Tantric Buddhism. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 1412:3.
     
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  9.  2
    Michael Saso (1987). " Kuden": The Oral Hermeneutics of Tendai Tantric Buddhism. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 14 (2/3):235-246.
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  10.  9
    Rita M. Gross (2005). Courtesans and Tantric Consorts: Sexualities in Buddhist Narrative, Iconography, and Ritual (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 25 (1):174-176.
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  11.  11
    Michael Roach (2003). The Tibetan Book of Yoga: Ancient Buddhist Teachings on the Philosophy and Practice of Yoga. Doubleday.
    Yoga came to Tibet from India more than a thousand years ago, and it was quickly absorbed into the culture's rich traditions. In this small book readers will discover Heart Yoga, which developed over the centuries in the Gelukpa tradition of the Dalai Lamas. The program presented here combines popular yoga exercises wtih special Tibetan poses, and methods of working from the inside to give a healthy and a happy heart. Roach discovered a number of previously unknown Tibetan works on (...)
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  12.  4
    Lalan Prasad Singh (2010). Buddhist Tantra: A Philosophical Reflection and Religious Investigation. Concept Pub. Co..
    ... Introduction to Buddhist Tantra Tantra forms the esoteric basis of all major religions. It stands for the awakening of dormant divinity. It is a mystic technique to invoke the spirituality of man and woman.
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  13.  26
    Ronald M. Davidson (2009). Studies in Dhāraṇī Literature I: Revisiting the Meaning of the Term Dhāraṇī. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (2):97-147.
    The Mahāyāna Buddhist term dhāraṇī has been understood to be problematic since the mid-nineteenth century, when it was often translated as “magical phrase” or “magical formula” and was considered to be emblematic of tantric Buddhism. The situation improved in contributions by Bernhard, Lamotte and Braarvig, and the latter two suggested the translation be “memory,” but this remained difficult in many environments. This paper argues that dhāraṇī is a function term denoting “codes/coding,” so that the category dhāraṇī is polysemic (...)
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  14.  6
    John Krummel, Kûkai. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy article on the founder of Shingon (Japanese Tantric) Buddhism, Kūkai (774-835CE).
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  15. Suniti Kumar Pathak, Ramaranjan Mukherji & Buddhadev Bhattacharya (eds.) (2009). Dimensions of Buddhism and Jainism: Professor Suniti Kumar Pathak Felicitation Volume. Sanskrit Book Depot.
     
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  16.  17
    Herbert V. Guenther (1992). Meditation Differently, Phenomenological-Psychological Aspects of Tibetan Buddhist (Mahāmudrā and Snying-Thig) Practices From Original Tibetan Sources. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    Concept of meditation in Tibetan Buddhism. - Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-198). - Includes indexes.
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  17.  12
    John W. M. Krummel (forthcoming). Kūkai's Shingon: Embodiment of Emptiness. In Bret W. Davis (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    This chapter explicates the philosophy of the body of sixth-century Buddhist thinker Kūkai. Kūkai brings together what initially seem to be opposing concepts: body and emptiness. He does this in the context of formulating a system of cosmology inseparable from religious practice. We interact with the rest of the cosmos through our body. Kūkai characterizes the cosmos in turn as the body of the Buddha, who personifies the embodiment of the dharma. This cosmic body is comprised of myriad bodies through (...)
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  18. Dpal-Khaṅ Ṅag-Dbaṅ-Chos-Kyi-Rgya-Mtsho (2011). Dus Gsum Gyi Rgyal Ba Sras Daṅ Bcas Paʼi Bstan Pa Mthaʼ Dag Daṅ Khyad Par Rdo Rje ʼchan Karma-Paʼi Dgoṅs Pa Gsal Bar Byed Paʼi Bstan Bcos Thar Paʼi Lam Chen Bgrod Paʼi Śiṅ Rta Źes Bya Ba Bźugs So. [REVIEW] Bod-Ljoṅs Mi Dmaṅs Dpe Skrun Khaṅ.
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  19. Ṅag-Dbaṅ-Dpal-Ldan (2009). Khutagt Manzushriĭn Aldryg U̇nėkhėėr Ȯgu̇u̇lėkhu̇ĭn Zu̇rkhėn Utgyn Khuraanguĭ T͡sagaan Li͡ankhuan I͡aruu U̇gs Khėmėėgdėkh. Admon.
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  20. Rdo-Rje-Tshe-Riṅ (ed.) (2006). Gsaṅ Chen Sṅa-ʼgyur Rñiṅ-Ma-Paʼi Gsuṅ Rab Phyogs Bsgrigs Dri Med Legs Bśad Kun ʼdus nor Buʼi Baṅ Mdzod Las .. [REVIEW] Mtsho-Sṅon Mi-Rigs Dpe-Skrun-Khaṅ.
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  21. Jean M. Rivière (1998). Tantrik Yoga: Hindu and Tibetan. Distributed by Pilgrims Book House.
     
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  22. Ram Swarup (2000). Meditations: Yogas, Gods, Religions. Voice of India.
     
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  23. Martin A. Mills (2002). Identity, Ritual and State in Tibetan Buddhism: The Foundations of Authority in Gelukpa Monasticism. Routledge.
    This is a major anthropological study of contemporary Tibetan Buddhist monasticism and tantric ritual in the Ladakh region of North-West India and of the role of tantric ritual in the formation and maintenance of traditional forms of state structure and political consciousness in Tibet. Containing detailed descriptions and analyses of monastic ritual, the work builds up a picture of Tibetan tantric traditions as they interact with more localised understandings of bodily identity and territorial cosmology, to produce a (...)
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  24.  16
    Yaroslav Komarovski (2006). Reburying the Treasure—Maintaining the Continuity: Two Texts by Śākya Mchog Ldan on the Buddha-Essence. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (6):521-570.
    The rich and interconnected universe of Śākya Mchog Ldan’s views, including those on the buddha-essence, cannot be limited to or summarized in a few neat categories. Nevertheless, the following two interrelated ideas are crucial for understanding Śākya Mchog Ldan’s interpretation of the buddha-essence: 1) only Mahāyāna āryas (’phags pa) have the buddha-essence characterized by the purity from adventitious stains (glo bur rnam dag).
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  25. Herbert V. Guenther (1969). Yuganaddha, the Tantric View of Life. Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office.
     
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  26. Gus Koehler, Radiance of Time.
    For Vajrayana Buddhism, the now is an interval, a boundary, a point of tension and suspension with an atmosphere of uncertainty. It is a bifurcation point of variable length; its name is “bardo.” The bardo is immersed in the conventional, or “seeming” reality. It emerges from what is called the “unstained” ultimate or primordial emptiness or “basal clear light.” Further, the ultimate is not the sphere of cognition. Cognition, including cognition of time, belongs to conventional reality. Buddhahood, in contrast, (...)
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  27.  37
    Kate Crosby (2000). Tantric Theravāda: A Bibliographic Essay on the Writings of François Bizot and Others on the Yogāvacara Tradition. Contemporary Buddhism 1 (2):141-198.
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  28.  1
    Helmut Wautischer (ed.) (2008). Ontology of Consciousness: Percipient Action. A Bradford Book.
    The "hard problem" of today's consciousness studies is subjective experience: understanding why some brain processing is accompanied by an experienced inner life. Recent scientific advances offer insights for understanding the physiological and chemical phenomenology of consciousness. But by leaving aside the internal experiential nature of consciousness in favor of mapping neural activity, such science leaves many questions unanswered. In Ontology of Consciousness, scholars from a range of disciplines -- from neurophysiology to parapsychology, from mathematics to anthropology and indigenous non-Western modes (...)
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  29. Christian Thomas Kohl (2008). Buddhism and Quantum Physics. Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies 9 (2008):45-62.
    Rudyard Kipling, the famous english author of « The Jungle Book », born in India, wrote one day these words: « Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet ». In my paper I show that Kipling was not completely right. I try to show the common ground between buddhist philosophy and quantum physics. There is a surprising parallelism between the philosophical concept of reality articulated by Nagarjuna and the physical concept of reality implied (...)
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  30. Christian Coseru (2013). Reason and Experience in Buddhist Epistemology. In Steven Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    As a specific domain of inquiry, “ Buddhist epistemology” stands primarily for the dialogical-disputational context in which Buddhists advance their empirical claims to knowledge and articulate the principles of reason on the basis of which such claims may be defended. The main questions pursued in this article concern the tension between the notion that knowledge is ultimately a matter of direct experience---which the Buddhist considers as more normative than other, more indirect, modes of knowing---and the largely discursive and argumentative ways (...)
     
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  31.  30
    Colette Sciberras (2008). Buddhism and Speciesism: On the Misapplication of Western Concepts to Buddhist Beliefs. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 15:215-240.
    In this article, I defend Buddhism from Paul Waldau’s charge of speciesism. I argue that Waldau attributes to Buddhism various notions that it does not necessarily have, such as the ideas that beings are morally considerable if they possess certain traits, and that humans, as morally considerable beings, ought never to be treated as means. These ideas may not belong in Buddhism, and for Waldau’s argument to work, he needs to show that they do. Moreover, a closer (...)
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  32.  42
    Owen J. Flanagan (2011). The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized. MIT Press.
    An Essay in Comparative Neurophilosophy -- Preface -- Introduction: Buddhism Naturalized -- The Bodhisattva's Brain -- The Colour of Happiness -- Buddhist Epistemology and Science -- Buddhism as a Natural Philosophy. Buddhist Persons -- Being No-self & Being Nice -- Virtue & Happiness -- Postscript: Cosmopolitanism and Comparative Philosophy.
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  33.  99
    Bronwyn Finnigan (forthcoming). Buddhist Idealism. In Tyron Goldschmidt & Kenneth Pearce (eds.), Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics. Oxford
    This article surveys some of the most influential Buddhist arguments in defense of idealism. It begins by clarifying the central theses under dispute and rationally reconstructs arguments from four major Buddhist figures in defense of some or all of these theses. It engages arguments from Vasubandhu’s Viṃśikā and Triṃśikā; Dignāga’s matching-failure argument in the Ālambanaparīkṣā; the sahopalambhaniyama inference developed by Dharmakīrti; and Xuanzang’s weird but clever logical argument that intrigued philosophers in China and Japan. It aims to clarify what is (...)
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  34.  90
    Bradford Cokelet (forthcoming). Confucianism, Buddhism, and Virtue Ethics. European Journal for the Philosophy of Religion.
    Are Confucian and Buddhist ethical views closer to Kantian, Consequentialist, or Virtue Ethical ones? And how can such comparisons shed light on the unique aspects of Confucian and Buddhist views? This essay (i) provides a historically grounded framework for distinguishing western views, (ii) identifies a series of questions that we can ask in order to clarify the philosophic accounts of ethical motivation embedded in the Buddhist and Confucian traditions, and (iii) then critiques Lee Ming-huei’s claim that Confucianism is closer to (...)
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  35.  88
    Jay L. Garfield (2002). Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation. Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects Jay Garfield 's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield 's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
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  36. Andrea Sauchelli (forthcoming). Buddhist Reductionism, Fictionalism About the Self, and Buddhist Fictionalism. Philosophy East and West 67 (2).
    I discuss an interpretation, recently proposed by Mark Siderits, of the claim that within the Buddhist tradition the self is a convenient fiction. I subsequently propose a novel approach to fictionalism in contemporary metaphysics, outline an application of such an approach to the case of the self and then specify one version of fictionalism combined with some basic tenets of Buddhism.
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  37.  13
    Bronwyn Finnigan (forthcoming). The Nature of a Buddhist Path: Is There a Single Approach to Buddhist Ethical Theory? In Jake Davis (ed.), TBA. Oxford
    Is there a ‘common element’ in Buddhist ethical thought from which one might rationally reconstruct a Buddhist normative ethical theory? While many agree that there is such an element, there is disagreement about whether it is best reconstructed in terms that approximate consequentialism or virtue ethics. This paper will argue that two distinct evaluative relations underlie these distinct positions; an instrumental and constitutive analysis. It will raise some difficulties for linking these distinct analyses to particular normative ethical theories but will (...)
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  38.  41
    Christian Coseru (2012). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    What turns the continuous flow of experience into perceptually distinct objects? Can our verbal descriptions unambiguously capture what it is like to see, hear, or feel? How might we reason about the testimony that perception alone discloses? Christian Coseru proposes a rigorous and highly original way to answer these questions by developing a framework for understanding perception as a mode of apprehension that is intentionally constituted, pragmatically oriented, and causally effective. By engaging with recent discussions in phenomenology and analytic philosophy (...)
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  39. Finn Janning (2014). True Detective: Buddhism, Pessimism or Philosophy? Journal of Philosophy of Life 4 (4).
    The aim of this paper is to raise two questions. The first question is: How is pessimism related to Buddhism (and vice versa)? The second question is: What relation does an immanent philosophy have to pessimism and Buddhism, if any? Using True Detective, an American television crime drama, as my point of departure, first I will outline some of the likenesses between Buddhism and pessimism. At the same time, I will show how the conduct of one of (...)
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  40.  78
    William Edelglass & Jay L. Garfield (eds.) (2009). Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. Oxford University Press.
    This volume is an ideal single text for an intermediate or advanced course in Buddhist philosophy, and makes this tradition immediately accessible to the ...
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  41.  10
    Daniel Capper (2014). The Trees, My Lungs: Self Psychology and the Natural World at an American Buddhist Center. Zygon 49 (3):554-571.
    This study employs ethnographic field data to trace a dialogue between the self-psychological concept of the self object and experiences regarding the concept of “interbeing” at a Vietnamese Buddhist monastery in the United States. The dialogue develops an understanding of human experiences with the nonhuman natural world which are tensive, liminal, and nondual. From the dialogue I find that the self object concept, when applied to this form of Buddhism, must be inclusive enough to embrace relationships with animals, stones, (...)
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  42.  40
    Daniel Anderson Arnold (2012). Brains, Buddhas, and Believing: The Problem of Intentionality in Classical Buddhist and Cognitive-Scientific Philosophy of Mind. Columbia University Press.
    Aiming to complicate this story, Dan Arnold confronts a significant obstacle to popular attempts at harmonizing classical Buddhist and modern scientific thought: since most Indian Buddhists believe that the mental continuum is uninterrupted ..
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  43.  27
    Matthew Kapstein (2001). Reason's Traces: Identity and Interpretation in Indian & Tibetan Buddhist Thought. Wisdom Publications.
    Reason's Traces is a collection of essays by one of the foremost authorities on Indian and Tibetan Buddhism.
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  44.  34
    Stefano Pace (2013). Does Religion Affect the Materialism of Consumers? An Empirical Investigation of Buddhist Ethics and the Resistance of the Self. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):25-46.
    This paper investigates the effects of Buddhist ethics on consumers’ materialism, that is, the propensity to attach a fundamental role to possessions. The literature shows that religion and religiosity influence various attitudes and behaviors of consumers, including their ethical beliefs and ethical decisions. However, most studies focus on general religiosity rather than on the specific doctrinal ethical tenets of religions. The current research focuses on Buddhism and argues that it can tame materialism directly, similar to other religions, and through (...)
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  45.  26
    Christian Coseru (2014). Buddhism, Comparative Neurophilosophy, and Human Flourishing. Zygon 49 (1):208-219.
    Owen Flanagan's The Bodhisattva's Brain represents an ambitious foray into cross-cultural neurophilosophy, making a compelling, though not entirely unproblematic, case for naturalizing Buddhist philosophy. While the naturalist account of mental causation challenges certain Buddhist views about the mind, the Buddhist analysis of mind and mental phenomena is far more complex than the book suggests. Flanagan is right to criticize the Buddhist claim that there could be mental states that are not reducible to their neural correlates; however, when the mental states (...)
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  46.  68
    Charles Goodman (2009). Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Fundamental Buddhist teachings -- Main features of some western ethical theories -- Teravāda ethics as rule-consequentialism -- Mahāyāna ethics before Śāntideva and after -- Transcending ethics -- Buddhist ethics and the demands of consequentialism -- Buddhism on moral responsibility -- Punishment -- Objections and replies -- A Buddhist response to Kant.
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  47.  21
    Charles Goodman (2014). Buddhism, Naturalism, and the Pursuit of Happiness. Zygon 49 (1):220-230.
    Owen Flanagan's important book The Bodhisattva's Brain presents a naturalized interpretation of Buddhist philosophy. Although the overall approach of the book is very promising, certain aspects of its presentation could benefit from further reflection. Traditional teachings about reincarnation do not contradict the doctrine of no self, as Flanagan seems to suggest; however, they are empirically rather implausible. Flanagan's proposed “tame” interpretation of karma is too thin; we can do better at fitting karma into a scientific worldview. The relationship between eudaimonist (...)
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  48.  12
    Tomomi Asakura (2015). Theory of Personhood in Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan: Reflections on Critical Buddhism's View of the Kyoto School. Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 12 (1):41-63.
    This paper attempts to interpret the theory of personhood in the works of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) in a way that refutes a certain type of Nishida interpretation that Critical Buddhism offers. According to this type of interpretation, the logic of basho is a modern version of the Qixinlun system. Based on this interpretation, Critical Buddhism denounces Kyoto School philosophy as "topical Buddhism." This paper shows how Nishida himself consciously differentiates his philosophy from the idealistic and monistic system (...)
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  49. Bronwyn Finnigan (2015). Madhyamaka Buddhist Meta-Ethics: Investigating the Justificatory Grounds of Moral Judgments. Philosophy East and West 65 (3):765-785.
    This paper investigates whether the metaphysical commitments of Madhyamaka Buddhism afford a satisfactory justificatory ground for moral judgments. Finnigan and Tanaka (2011a) argue that they do not. Their argument has since been challenged by Tillemans (2010-11), who alleges that both Svātantrika and Prāsaṅgika Mādhyamikas can readily justify moral judgments by respective appeal to the doctrine of the two truths. This paper shall contest this claim with respect to Prāsaṅgika Madhyamaka. It shall provide several arguments to show that Prāsaṅgika cannot (...)
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  50. James Giles (1993). The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, and (...)
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